Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie

Publisher: Blackwell Publishing

Description

The Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie is a leading international journal on contemporary issues in human geography committed to promoting rigorous academic work on the field. Through its scholarly articles and special 'dossiers' on topics of interest it brings you the latest research findings from Europe and around the world in authoritative scientific contributions. The journal bridges the gap between continental European practices of geography and the Anglo-American traditions by including articles from both regions. The Tijdschrift is a channel for the dissemination of new perspectives ideas and approaches to the study of human geography. Regular features of the journal are its Outlook on Europe and Window on The Netherlands sections which discuss current spatial trends and policies from a Dutch geographical perspective. The Netherlands in Maps Each issue of Tijdschrift includes maps demonstrating the distribution of key phenomena in Dutch society. Drawing on statistical data from past and present these maps provide visual representation of the characteristics of and changes in the human geography of The Netherlands. The theme for 2000 is: Crime in The Netherlands. From time to time the maps are collected in an annotated atlas which provides a welcome thematic addition to standard atlases.

  • Impact factor
    0.68
  • 5-year impact
    0.79
  • Cited half-life
    7.20
  • Immediacy index
    0.24
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.33
  • Website
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie website
  • ISSN
    1467-9663
  • OCLC
    163230468
  • Material type
    Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Blackwell Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Some journals impose embargoes typically of 6 or 12 months, occasionally of 24 months
    • no listing of affected journals available as yet
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • Publisher version cannot be used
    • On author or institutional or subject-based server
    • Server must be non-commercial
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with set statement ("The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com ")
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'Blackwell Publishing' is an imprint of 'Wiley-Blackwell'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The paper begins with an introduction into the interlocking network model (INM) initially specified by Peter Taylor in the context of the Globalization and World Cities (GaWC) research network. For that purpose, the intellectual background, purpose, key principles and subsequent applications of the INM are presented. Since the overall purpose of the Special Issue is to take research inspired by the INM further, this paper gives, second, an overview of some of the main critiques raised against the INM. Third, the relevance of the different papers of the Special Issue is framed within these critiques. The papers in the Special Issue can be divided in two groups: while the first set discusses the measurement framework, the second focuses on the conceptual remit of the INM.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 09/2014; 105(4).
  • Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 09/2014; 105(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: From the late 1990s, the establishment of a new relational ‘turn’ in the study of world city connectedness in globalisation has run parallel to the wider relational turn occurring in economic geography. Early work, built firmly upon a qualitative approach to the collection and analyses of new intercity datasets, considered cities as being constituted by their relations with other cities. Subsequent research, however, would take a strong quantitative turn, best demonstrated through the articulation of the inter-locking world city network (ILWCN) ‘model’ for measuring relations between cities. In this paper, we develop a critique of research based around the ILWCN model, arguing that this ‘top down’ quantitative approach has now reached a theoretical impasse. To address this impasse, we argue for a move away from structural approaches in which the firm is the main unit of analysis, towards qualitative approaches in which individual agency and practice are afforded greater importance.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 09/2014; 105(4).
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    ABSTRACT: The paper charts a personal research journey that begins with the specification of the interlocking network model for cities and concludes with interpretation of cities as truly extraordinary. Three products of this model are discussed. First, this very specific model has generated a mini-literature on cities in globalisation and this is briefly outlined. Second, the model has been interpreted as a generic description of inter-city relations – central flow theory – and this is illustrated using historical examples. Third, there is a discussion of criticisms of the model and the relevance of green networks of extraordinary cities for thinking about the future of humanity.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 09/2014; 105(4).
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    ABSTRACT: In the literature on world city networks, there has been a proliferation of both theories and measurement methodologies, but relatively little attention to the linkage between theory and measurement. In this paper, I review the interlocking world city network model (IWCNM) and three additional bipartite projection-based measures of the world city network, considering which theoretical conception of the ‘world city network’ construct each can validly measure. I introduce a new Stata command, onemode, to compute these four measures, and use them to produce world city networks from three publicly available datasets on advanced producer services, international organisations, and engineering and architecture firms. The results suggest that each projection-based measure is potentially valid, but only for a corresponding understanding of the world city network. Researchers are encouraged to clearly define what they mean when invoking the phrase ‘the world city network,’ and only then selecting a measurement that is valid.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 09/2014; 105(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Macroeconomic imbalances are a substantial characteristic of the recent economic crisis in Europe. As several authors emphasise the impact of the state, public institutions and territorial structures on the world city, the impact of the crisis on the economic performance of global cities becomes a crucial question. After discussing the theoretical aspects of the state – global city linkages and discussing two fields of influence on the global city formation, the empirical section analyses the deviation of national and regional growth performance to estimate the decoupling of European global cities from the national economies. The results show that the correlation between European global cities and the national scale also depends on the form of capitalism and the territorial organisation of statehood.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 09/2014; 105(4).
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    ABSTRACT: The paper discusses in a personal appreciation of the literature whether the ‘interlocking world city network model’ (IWCNM) has contributed to overcoming the evidential crisis of world or global city research. After a brief summary of the main arguments made by John Friedmann and Saskia Sassen, the paper deduces methodological implications that follow from their economic-geographical conceptualisation of global cities. In the third and fourth sections of the paper I recapitulate the rationale(s) given by Peter Taylor for the IWCNM and assess the model's contribution to empirically corroborating the global city concept. The paper's main claim is that the IWCNM bypasses the theoretical core of the global city paradigm, for which reason an evidential crisis continues to undermine the strength of the global city argument. Accordingly, in the last section of the paper a research strategy is proposed that is apt to take global city studies a step forward.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 09/2014; 105(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This Windows on the Netherlands addresses the economic geography of commodity trade by providing insights from two Dutch port cities: Rotterdam and Amsterdam. It is argued that commodity traders provide an empirical site for uncovering the missing links between research on world cities on the one hand, and global commodity chains on the other. Commodity trading is compelling as it is linked both with the financial sector (financing and paper trade) and with the production and distribution of commodities (storage and transportation). However, these two activities do not necessarily need to be in geographical proximity. Rotterdam and Amsterdam handle large volumes of commodities flowing through their ports, but the trading desks of the large commodity houses handle the trade transactions. There is a strong presence of the world's largest commodity traders in the Netherlands, which include not only the port-based physical-operational functions but also the trading desks, treasuries and holding companies. The paper concludes with an overview of avenues for further research.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 09/2014; 105(4).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper analyses how a cluster of clothing firms in Peru fared over a 15 year period. The question is how and why this cluster has changed. We collected data for 1993 and 2007, comparing clustered and dispersed firms. The cluster grew significantly in terms of the number of firms and employment, due to the attraction of trade activities towards the cluster. The productivity of clustered producers fell somewhat, although they maintain an advantage over dispersed firms. This is due to static advantages falling into a producer's lap once located in the area and developing at the level of transacting inputs and output. Clustered producers do not use profits to upgrade businesses but rather invest in real estate. On the whole, they are struggling. Enhancing the quality of cluster governance is critical to prevent a further decline of the production part of the cluster.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Like many other cities in Europe, from the early 1990s, Amsterdam and The Hague have over time intensified their EU engagement. In both cities there has been a switch from a view on Europe as problem solver, threat or duty, towards Europe as a means of profiling and identity building, as reflected in a change from passive towards active behaviour vis-à-vis Europe. Whereas European activities initially were rather a formal practice, they have finally been put on the local political agendas. At the same time, this process of Europeanisation seems to fare under the aegis of a wider process of internationalisation. The basic driving force is not aimed at Europe at all.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Citizen participation is often regarded as a means to increase local democracy. Seldom is participation viewed as a means to legitimate disruptive practices of states. However, participation can become a tool for the effective implementation of policy rather than a means to enhance justice, if no power is transferred to citizens. Displacement in Amsterdam is a case in point. Here the local council together with housing corporations yearly forces over 2,000 households to leave their houses, a consequence of an ambitious policy of state-led gentrification. Following Foucault, I explore the rationalities and techniques employed to ensure compliance. The promise of influence lures tenants into lengthy discussions with power holders. Investment choices are presented as objective facts and so provide a rationale for the disruptive interventions. Participation thus provides government a platform to impose its views in a context of severe power asymmetries, while alternatives are marginalised and dissent is disciplined.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 04/2014; 105(2).
  • Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 04/2014; 105(2).
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    ABSTRACT: This is a study of family consumption in an upgraded Amsterdam neighbourhood. It aims to unravel the relationship between the increase of middle-class families and the establishing of new family-related consumption spaces, both commercial and public. Based on observations and interviews in Amsterdam, we identify an increase in family and child directed consumption spaces. They reflect parental wishes to continue their former childless lifestyle, the need to combine work and care, and the wish to educate children in a wide range of skills. The more intensive consumption of parks and sidewalks reveals new practices of public parenting in urban contexts. It is argued that the transformation from childless yuppie to young urban professional parent (yupp) not only goes along with new consumption cultures but also with the production of a new city. This re-invented city has potentials for age and gender equality, however unequal class relations appear to continue.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 04/2014; 105(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Development economics has become something of an innovator within the discipline of economics, due to its adoption of experimental and statistical analysis techniques. In this paper I give examples of this new trend in development economics: randomised-control trials, natural experiments, specialist analytical techniques like pre-analysis plans, and evidence-driven policy evaluation. I explore this novel experimental development economics in conversation with current argumentation in economic/development geography about economics. I do this in order to ask whether this experimental trend responds to any of these geographical critiques. Although I find that this new development economics repeats many of the tendencies of economics that geographers find so specious, it does pose challenges to economic/development geography, which I explore.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The analysis of the location patterns of economic activities in both Europe and the US has been addressed in an extensive literature dependent on increasingly more sophisticated techniques that arguably reframe debate away from the policy questions in focus and towards debate on the complex empirical techniques that seem to be in vogue at any given time. In part this has been a response to some clear shortcomings in the use of simple locational Gini coefficients. It is argued herein that simple index approaches can still retain value if augmented with intuitive reading of some relevant maps. An example of the utility of this approach is provided in relation to the location patterns of four exemplar manufacturing industries in the EU and USA.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 04/2014;
  • Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 04/2014; 105(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Comparing air service growth in Amsterdam and Brussels, this paper aims to understand how the strategies of airlines and public authorities allow certain medium-sized cities to succeed in exceeding their local market by connecting passengers, while others do not. In contrast to Brussels, Amsterdam has become one of the most air serviced European cities, reaching a highly disproportionate level of service given both its size and its airport catchment area. Amsterdam has reached its rank thanks to a successful, global hub-and-spokes strategy led by KLM and its partners. Such a success story would have been impossible without support from the State pursuing the expansion of numerous, liberal bilateral air service agreements and a regional development strategy which facilitated the expansion of Amsterdam Schiphol airport in the 1990s. Finally, this paper shows how public and corporate governances might be able to convert themselves to the rules of the market economy.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Privatisation and liberalisation of the housing market are often used as governmental strategies for engineering the social composition of urban neighbourhoods. Drawing on longitudinal register data, this study reports findings from the highly-regulated housing context of Amsterdam. Through regression modelling and GIS analyses, we demonstrate that tenure conversions from rent to owner-occupancy are not just bringing about changes in social-class composition, but also affect the ethnic and demographic compositions. Moreover, conversions from rent to ownership have highly spatially-specific effects. Our evidence suggests that tenure conversions may contribute to gentrification in the inner-city of Amsterdam, while conversions in post-war neighbourhoods do not lead to a social upgrading and may even facilitate downgrading. Furthermore, trends in the converted section of the housing market are not just mirroring income developments but also seem to reflect trends in ethnic segregation and demographic trends such as a renewed interest among families to live in the inner-city.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 04/2014; 105(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Even though there is a growing literature on the extent and impacts of state-led gentrification and displacement, there is little attention to the process of change in restructuring neighbourhoods and how residents experience the threat of displacement. How is it to live in a house that is to be demolished? How does a neighbourhood change once it is targeted for gentrification? How do the residents experience the threat of displacement before actual displacement takes place? This paper addresses this gap and investigates the trajectory of neighborhood change in neighbourhoods targeted for gentrification. Based on an ethnographic study of the renewal process in Tarlabaşı /Istanbul, it discusses how residents live under the threat of displacement.
    Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 04/2014; 105(2).

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