Current Issues in Language Planning (Curr Issues Lang Plann )

Description

Multilingual Matters Ltd is pleased to announce this new journal for 2000. It will provide major summative and review studies spanning and focusing the disparate language policy and language planning literature related to: 1) polities and 2) major issues in the field. The journal will bring together two types of material: "The Language Situation inÖ." and "Issues in Language Planning". The unique feature of the second section is the use of web database technology to invite comment on an extended abstract before publication of an issue and the papers for two or three months after publication. After the discussion is closed, the editors will prepare a digest for publication in a subsequent issue of the journal.

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  • Website
    Current Issues in Language Planning website
  • Other titles
    Current issues in language planning (Online), Current issues in language planning
  • ISSN
    1466-4208
  • OCLC
    49479527
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Current Issues in Language Planning 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Flanders, the northern, Dutch-speaking part of Belgium, is experiencing growing intra and interlingual diversity. On the intralingual level, Tussentaal ('in-between-language') has emerged as a cluster of intermediate varieties between the Flemish dialects and Standard Dutch, gradually becoming the colloquial language. At the same time, Flanders is encountering increasing numbers of immigrants and their languages. This paper analyses the way Flemish language-in-education policy deals with perceived problems of substandardisation and multilingualism, in order to create equal opportunities for all pupils, regardless of their native language or social background. Both the policy and the measures it proposes are strongly influenced by different, yet intertwined ideologies of standardisation and monolingualism. By propagating Standard Dutch as the only acceptable language and by denying all forms of language diversity, Flemish language-in-education policy not only fails to create equal opportunities, but reinforces ideologies that maintain inequality. Instead, language policy should be open towards language diversity, taking the role of teachers in forming and implementing policies into consideration. Keywords: language-in-education policy, standard language ideology, monolingualism, social inequality, Dutch in Flanders, Tussentaal. DOWNLOAD THE ARTICLE FOR FREE HERE http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/bDAhZPirIqn8eRscqEaj/full
    Current Issues in Language Planning 09/2014; 15(3-4).
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    ABSTRACT: This monograph describes the language planning situation in Algeria. It uses a historical perspective to understand the processes involved in language change, language policies and language-in-education practices of the polity. The monograph is divided into six parts. The first one presents a background on the country and the people to show its geographical and ethnic diversity on which linguistic plurality is grounded. The second part deals with the evolution of the economic situation—from centralised economic nationalism to market economy—and its repercussion on the issues mentioned above. The third part examines the language profile of Algeria and the diachronic evolution that led to it. Language policy and planning, described in the fourth part, considers, first, the unilingual demand of the nationalist period (in favour of Arabisation), then, the new language policy which promotes multilingualism within a democratising structure. The fifth part examines planned language spread and use via language-in-education, the milieu and the media in its first section, and unplanned developments in its second section. The final part of the monograph focuses on future prospects against the background of past practices and Algeria's new language policy. It argues that Arabisation led to crises and that recent policy decisions may produce changes that are more in tune with the country's linguistic situation.
    Current Issues in Language Planning 03/2014; 6(4):379-502.
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    ABSTRACT: At the outset of the twenty-first century, the survival of many minority and indigenous languages is threatened by globalization and the ubiquity of dominant languages such as English in the worlds of communication and commerce. In a number of cases, these negative trends are being resisted by grassroots activists and governments. Indeed, there are many examples of activists and governments working together in this manner to preserve and revitalize indigenous languages and cultures. Such coordinated efforts are vital to the success of language revitalization. This article compares the work of language activists and governments in three small island jurisdictions in the British Isles: the Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey. Comparison between these cases is greatly facilitated by similarities in their political, economic and demographic circumstances. The cases, however, reveal important differences in the way that activists and governments have responded to the challenges of language revitalization, as well as some interesting insights on the future prospects of the indigenous languages of these small island jurisdictions. Keywords: language revitalization; indigenous languages; grassroots activists; government; Manx; Jèrriais; Guernesiais
    Current Issues in Language Planning 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The literature shows that English-medium instruction (EMI) programmes at the tertiary level in various parts of the world have positioned EMI as a language-planning tool to promote students’ mastery of English. English proficiency is believed to be intertwined with the overall economic development of a country. In addition to internationalising education, the reintroduction of EMI in public universities in Malaysia has been used by policy-makers as a strategy for improving graduates’ English proficiency, because their low levels of English are perceived as a barrier to attaining the national development agenda. However, the reinstatement of EMI policy contradicts the provision of the national language in the Constitution of Malaysia. This paper examines the nature of the policy and investigates how it is enacted in practice. It illustrates how the macro (national) and meso (university) language policies of EMI are negotiated in written form to avoid the ‘sensitivity’ of language of instruction in relation to contravening the use of Bahasa Malaysia, and how one university has responded to the push for the implementation of EMI. The findings indicated that the macro language policy goals did not trickle down to meso and micro levels as envisioned by policy-makers, which implicates underlying issues arising from provision and dissemination. The paper argues that this gap between policy goals and their implementation is a factor that should be considered in such a crucial planning strategy for the national agenda.
    Current Issues in Language Planning 03/2013; 14(1):73-92.
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    ABSTRACT: This article examines how students and teachers at a non-Orthodox Jewish day school in New York City negotiate the use of translation within the context of an institutionalized language policy that stresses the use of a sacred language over that of the vernacular. Specifically, this paper analyzes the negotiation of a Hebrew-only policy through the ethnographic examination of language choices during activities surrounding scripture study and prayer. The ethnographic data reveal not only how the translating choices were linked with the discourses of authenticity, intentionality, and affect, but also how the language policy was challenged in daily classroom practices. A key finding is that choices to translate from the sacred language, Hebrew, to the vernacular, English, were neither ideologically neutral nor simply limited to the linguistic sphere of rendering a sacred text comprehensible. Rather, they offer insight into the ways in which translation practices reflect broader questions regarding religious socialization and cultural hybridization within the American context.
    Current Issues in Language Planning 05/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: This monograph discusses South Korea?s language situation in a language policy and planning context. This monograph consists of four parts. Part 1 presents a genetic, typological and sociolinguistic description of South Korea?s national language, and an overview of minority languages, including English as well as other languages, recently transported into the country by migrant workers and foreign brides. Also included is information on the native writing system called Hankul. Part 2 focuses on language spread and maintenance through the national education system and other means. Part 3 concerns the major issues in South Korea?s language planning and policy, including orthographic reforms, lexical purification, the use and teaching of Chinese characters, digitization of Korean, and ?linguistic reunification? of North and South Korea. The final part of the monograph explores future prospects of South Korea?s language policy, some of the major issues being the ?linguistic reunification? of North and South Korea, the status and role of English and Chinese, and emergent multilingualism. The monograph also contains some thoughts on how language planning and policy might need to develop in the future, especially with respect to issues that do not directly concern the national language, e.g. emergent multilingualism.
    Current Issues in Language Planning 01/2012; 13(1):1-68.
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    ABSTRACT: Existing research concludes that diglossia between languages is a barrier to minority language use in health, social care and criminal justice settings. In addition, it concludes that more fulsome service provision is the key for promoting greater minority language use in such settings. Using the case of Welsh speakers in Wales as an exemplar, this paper explores what is known about minority language use in service settings and how that knowledge has been acquired. It is argued that the existing research has neglected the influence of interviews on accounts of minority language use. Moreover, it is argued that an important issue in promoting minority use in service settings is recognising and addressing the diglossia that can come to exist within a minority language once its use is institutionalised in such contexts.
    Current Issues in Language Planning 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: This paper argues that the linguistic struggles faced by the Southern African Development Community (the SADC) represent common linguistic struggles found in Africa and the world where some languages are accused of dominating, stifling and suppressing others. However, the language situation within the SADC is interesting because it offers us a rare opportunity in which we can observe two types or stages of a linguistic struggle at the same time; the first one involves a clash between European languages (English, French and Portuguese) that the SADC recognizes as its working languages and the second one involves a struggle between these European languages and the African languages spoken in the SADC region. But when all is said and done, linguistic struggles of this nature demonstrate to us that from a socio-political point of view, as opposed to a linguistic point of view, languages are not equal and they do not exist in a vacuum. Once placed next to each other, certain characteristics of each language (and its speakers) such as their economic, political or mobility power begin to emerge. The paper, therefore, sees the linguistic struggles within the SADC (the organization) and its region as all-encompassing and therefore in need of broad-based solutions that go beyond the SADC and Africa.
    Current Issues in Language Planning 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: The former British Labour Government acknowledged that religious practices play an important role in the development of children's identities [DCFS. (2009). Your child, your schools, our future: building a 21st century schools system. London: HMSO; DfES (2007). Curriculum review: Diversity and citizenship. London: HMSO]. However, little is known about the ways in which these identities develop in faith settings. This article aims to address language planning in faith lessons of ethnic churches and to reflect on how their language planning dynamics create (or not) opportunities for the children to develop their cultural, linguistic and religious identities. With this purpose, the article reports on part of two investigations of religious settings in the development of children's literacy and identity. The specific language ideologies of these migrant churches are explored mainly through an examination of the qualitative semi-structured interviews with their faith leaders, and comparisons are made to Pentecostal and Catholic leaders of Brazilian migrant groups; newcomers to the UK and with numbers on the rise. It is argued that, although a group's theological orientation is linked to the language ideologies of faith leaders, linguistic and cultural identities play an important role in the (unplanned) language planning of ethnic churches.
    Current Issues in Language Planning 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Traditional African literacy practices have often been ignored in the wake of European colonialism and the educational policies of colonial governments. Nonetheless, literacy had been established in parts of Africa following the introduction of Islam. This paper will examine the developments of literacy in pre-colonial West Africa. In this region, literacy was introduced for specifically religious functions associated with the practice of Muslim religion and was conducted in Arabic. The introduction of literacy for religious purposes also gave rise to the development of secular literacy practices in which the practices derived from religious literacy were developed in new contexts, and in African languages. The influence of Islam on literacy in Africa languages gave rise to Ajami, African language literacy using Arabic script. The development of Ajami involved a process of micro-language planning in which individuals educated in Arabic adapted Arabic script to the phonologies of local languages giving rise to variable, unstandardised written system.
    Current Issues in Language Planning 01/2012; 13(2):91-104.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this monograph is to provide a detailed account of language policy and language planning in Cyprus. Using both historical and synchronic data and adopting a mixed-methods approach (archival research, ethnographic tools and insights from sociolinguistics and Critical Discourse Analysis), this study attempts to trace the origins and the trajectories of language polices in Cyprus and to relate these to issues of ethnicity, community and national identity formation, language maintenance and language shift, as well as the varying constructions of the role of language in education. It will be shown that, while linguistic variation and multilingualism were historically a core feature of the linguistic communities of Cyprus, the end of the anticolonial struggle and the separation of the island's two major linguistic communities post-1974 has helped to establish effectively monolingual language policies, with a strong prioritization of national standard languages as opposed to sociolinguistically stigmatized varieties and minority languages. The monograph will also discuss language moribundity and prospects for potential reversal of language shift.
    Current Issues in Language Planning 11/2011; 12(4):503-569.
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    ABSTRACT: Promoting public understanding is what the programming mandate asks the Swiss public broadcasting company SRG SSR1 to do. From a sociolinguistic perspective, this means linking speech communities with other speech communities, both between and within the German-, French-, Italian-, and Romansh-speaking parts of Switzerland. In the IDéesuisse project, we investigated whether and how SRG SSR, caught between public service demands and market forces, should and actually does fulfill such language policy requirements. Four research modules were combined: module A focused on language policy expectations; module B on media management's interpretation; module C on media production; and module D on media reflection in the newsrooms. Methodologically, ethnography of news was extended through grounded theory and transdisciplinary action research. Interviews with policy-makers and media managers were triangulated with in-depth analyses of text production processes and workplace conversations. The overall findings are whereas the managers are usually frustrated by the expectations of media policy-makers, some experienced journalists find emergent solutions to overcome the conflict between the public mandate and the market. This tacit knowledge can be identified and made explicit to the entire organization in systemic knowledge transformation, for example, through empirically grounded recommendations.
    Current Issues in Language Planning 08/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: The languages of Klingon and Na'vi, both created for media, are also languages that have garnered much media attention throughout the course of their existence. Speakers of these languages also utilize social media and information technologies, specifically websites, in order to learn the languages and then put them into practice. While teaching a course on ‘Pidgins, Creoles, and Created Languages’, I realized that endangered language communities could learn techniques for interacting with the media from created language communities in order to help further develop the image and prestige planning for their languages. Also, endangered language communities could model the online resources of created language communities part of their acquisition planning. This paper draws on my experiences working with endangered language communities in Canada and Papua New Guinea in order to compare the language planning of these communities to that of Klingon and Na'vi speakers. I also discuss how endangered language communities might benefit from their examples and, finally, what some of the drawbacks to these technological advances may be in terms of language revitalization and maintenance.
    Current Issues in Language Planning 08/2011;