Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science (Theor Issues Ergon Sci )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science stimulates and develops a theoretical basis for the science of ergonomics, and thus formulates a methodology for this modern discipline. The Journal is proactive in its mission to develop a unique science, and seeks to define ergonomics as distinct and inherently valuable for the global knowledge community. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science provides an important forum for the presentation and debate of new ideas and thinking in this field. Whereas, other ergonomics publications have traditionally only responded to current needs and issues. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science emphasizes new knowledge, publishing only original, high-quality, peer-reviewed papers. Topics will include both qualitative and quantitative methodological frameworks and theories of ergonomics. Reviews and commentaries are commissioned. The journal presents papers that discuss principles of the investigative process in ergonomics research, social and historical issues, and 'science of science' perspectives on ergonomics. It also publishes papers examining the discipline itself, including bibliographical analyses of classic papers. Unlike any other ergonomics journal published today, Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science focuses on a broad array of theoretical issues, methodology, and philosophical dialogues within the science of ergonomics.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science website
  • Other titles
    Theor. issues in ergon. sci
  • ISSN
    1463-922X
  • OCLC
    45789787
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A kinematics model of the upper limb was developed using three degrees of freedom on the shoulder and one on the elbow. Whilst the direct kinematics equation computes the position of the hand, the inverse kinematics equation provides the upper limb's joint angles related to a given posture. Only after defining a discomfort cost function that accounts for the joint's displacement from the neutral position, the inverse kinematics equation for this model proved analytically solvable. Such solution was used in conjunction with observational postural assessment methods in order to improve the subjective estimation of the joint angles. Besides that, it was shown the utility of the direct kinematics equation in the rearrangement of the elements of the workplace.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 03/2015; 16(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Auditory displays are currently used in many medical, automotive and aviation settings. Although there are many existing guidelines for developing effective auditory signals, there is a need for more research considering the interaction between signals within a display, especially when sounds originate from conceptually distinct referent systems. Identifying the parameters that are most relevant to auditory similarity can facilitate acoustic branding and the development of guidelines that ensure signals for different systems are distinct without requiring standardisation. Twenty-seven undergraduate students judged the similarity of a set of abstract sounds varying in tempo, or pulse rate, fundamental frequency and burst density. Results indicate that no single parameter is entirely responsible for determining auditory similarity, but temporal characteristics are most salient. These findings have implications for acoustic branding and suggest that designers intending to ensure perceptual similarity and separation between differentially mapped sounds should manipulate temporal characteristics before frequency or burst density.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 03/2015; 16(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Two experiments examined allocation of responsibility in the context of a fictitious, but realistic, product-use scenario in which a young girl suffers serious brain injury after consuming a product with a non-obvious hazard (marshmallows). The research investigated whether the responsibility allocated to the various parties would depend on the age of the child and whether the manufacturer took, or failed to take, precautions. Scenarios given to participants stated the age of the girl as 1½ years, 4 years, 8 years, or 16 years and had positive, negative, or no supplemental information about the manufacturer and its safety practices. Both experiments showed that the parents were considered most responsible for a young child's injury, but the allocation decreased with the older child. When negative information about the manufacturer's safety practices was given, allocations of responsibility for the girl's injury to the manufacturer increased significantly. In Experiment 2, the presence of warnings in the positive supplemental information condition reduced the manufacturer's responsibility for the oldest (16-year old) child. Negative impressions due to poor safety practices by manufacturers can lead to increased levels of responsibility allocated for injury. Primary caretakers are responsible for the safety of young children, but as they get older, children are viewed as being more responsible for their own safety. These results have implications for product-development decisions including labelling. They also point out a role for human factors professionals before and during product-related forensic litigation.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 11/2014; 15(6).
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    ABSTRACT: There is an increasing agreement that back injuries in caregivers are the result of cumulative loading on the spine as opposed to individual loading events. Unfortunately, it is difficult to estimate cumulative loading with existing methods. This investigation considers whether measuring changes in height with a stadiometer can be used to estimate cumulative load. Nine healthy participants were asked to perform seated and standing desk work while wearing a weighted vest (10% body mass or unweighted), while height measurements were taken every hour for 4 h using a stadiometer. There was a significant difference between the loaded and unloaded conditions for both seated and standing cases. There was also a significant difference between the seated-loaded condition and the standing-loaded condition. This difference between the two loaded conditions indicates that spine shrinkage is dependent on posture. Therefore, it is not possible to estimate cumulative loading from height change alone.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 11/2014; 15(6).
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    ABSTRACT: Successful design and implementation of interoperable health IT requires an understanding of specific technological capabilities of systems, as well as how these systems impact clinical workflow. Several existing frameworks classify interoperability levels, but none focus on the impact on clinical work, particularly at the task level. A synthesis of existing interoperability frameworks from select interoperability frameworks in the literature about both medical and non-medical systems is presented and a new, 7-level framework in order to characterise the effect of varying levels of interoperability on the users’ work based upon qualitative data collected in a field study of the use of health information exchange in 12 ambulatory practices is proposed. The lowest level describes paper-based tasks completed with no access to electronic information from other institutions; the highest level describes interoperable systems in which data elements from other institutions are integrated into the patient's record seamlessly and in a computable format.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 11/2014; 15(6).
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    ABSTRACT: Ergonomic theory holds that accidents are preceded by periods of gradually increasing (but essentially unrecognised) risk, known originally in man-made disaster theory as the incubation period. This paper discusses the theorising of the dynamics of such accident incubation. It considers theoretical contributions – ranging from high-reliability to control theory to resilience engineering – for their ability to illuminate the driving forces behind a gradual shift in norms and erosion of safety margins, and for their ability to effectively track and represent such changes over time.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 11/2014; 15(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We propose that some of the knowledge management challenges incurred by computer-mediated collaboration be addressed by leveraging the computational resources inherent in that same collaboration to more directly serve it through Computational Collaboration Agents (CCAs). CCAs and the approach advocated here are motivated by the theory of Interactive Team Cognition which posits that team cognition can be observed in team interactions. CCAs observe and assess individual and collaborative events, analyse those events, interpret the analysis, and intervene as needed to improve collaboration. Because the CCAs are able to leverage events and actions that take place in the context of the collaboration technology, they have the advantage of operating in real-time without interfering with task performance.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 09/2014; 15(5).
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    ABSTRACT: Although system designers usually minimise the role of individual differences in operation, personality variables could explain differences in multitasking performance. A concomitant theoretical issue is whether primary or surface personality traits do a better job of predicting performance than the Five-Factor Model (FFM) or global traits. A sample of 174 undergraduates completed the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF), which was followed by a performance task. A computer-based task that measured simultaneous performance on an arithmetic task and a mental rotation task was used to measure multitasking performance; scores measured the percent accuracy. Primary traits for low emotional sensitivity and high abstractedness, self-control, and general reasoning were all correlated with performance (R 2 = .11), but global or traits corresponding to the FFM were not, except in one sporadic task trial. There was also a strong gender effect on performance. Implications for the study of personality traits in ergonomics are discussed.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 09/2014; 15(5).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an evaluation of the levels of automation. It draws on a prototype of an electrically powered wheelchair as an example of an ordinary automation device operated by less trained users with a broad range of abilities. A study is described during which 21 participants drove through a standardised course three times. Each time, another level of automation was active. As criteria, joint human-automation performance and user acceptance were measured. As predictors, fine motor abilities were assessed and task complexity was recorded. The analyses showed that higher levels of automation achieved lower user acceptance ratings. In contrast, higher levels of automation fostered better performance especially when less able participants steered the wheelchair and when the routes were more complex.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 09/2014; 15(5).
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    ABSTRACT: ‘Safety in design’ is becoming an increasingly used approach in a variety of domains. Also known as ‘safe design’ or ‘prevention through design’, the general process seeks to eliminate health and safety hazards, or minimise potential risks, by systematically involving end-users and decision makers in the full life cycle of the designed product or system. This article focuses on the need to better integrate human factors considerations within safe design for high-hazard industries. In particular, it describes the benefits of applying a task-based approach to assist design processes. By way of presenting a safe design method for equipment used in mining, it shows the need to obtain end-user input both to better reveal design deficiencies and to identify effective solutions for future equipment. Overall, a multidisciplinary framework is advocated, in particular by blending human factors techniques and structured risk management methods with the existing equipment design processes.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 01/2014; 15(3).
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    ABSTRACT: The operational control of complex systems such as power control and air traffic control is increasingly relegated to advanced technology devices with the expectation that operations controllers will maintain oversight of system and intervene where appropriate. Moreover, the centralisation of operations control has resulted in the oversight of systems remotely, typically through a human–machine interface. This article discusses the principles that underlie the design of interfaces for remote systems, drawing on theories of skill acquisition to address the needs of less experienced operators who are increasingly being engaged as operations controllers. Specifically, adaptive interfaces are advocated that are designed to facilitate the progression to expertise. Using cue utilisation as an underlying theoretical perspective, interfaces can be designed to extract and emphasise the relationship between features and events that eventually form the basis of the cues employed by expert practitioners.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 01/2014; 15(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Astronauts report certain experiences that can be classified as awe and wonder when looking out of their space station or shuttle portals at two different stimuli: the earth and deep space. Based on these reports, it was of interest to further investigate those types of experiences by using a mixed-reality environment resembling an International Space Station workstation designed to expose subjects to simulated stimuli of the earth and deep space. The study is multidisciplinary, involving simulation construction, physiological assessment, psychological testing, textual analysis, and phenomenological interviews. The goal was to induce in the average person the experiences and responses of the astronauts. Preliminary results show promise for using a virtual/mixed-reality environment in a laboratory when assessing cognitive/affective experiences, such as awe and wonder, found in a real-world context.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 01/2014; 15(4).
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    ABSTRACT: We present the psychological theory of action identification as a framework for a more in-depth understanding of a human operator's cognitive activity in the scope of cognitive engineering. A comparison of theoretical models and findings shows that both frameworks are founded on a similar theory of cognitive control based on an ontological viewpoint of means–ends relationships with the proposal that an individual mentally ‘navigates’ or ‘moves’ through a hierarchical arrangement of these relationships. However, whilst cognitive engineering begins the analysis from a viewpoint on affordances coming from the external work domain, the action identification theory starts from a viewpoint on action identities internally attributed to actions by individuals. We show that the conceptual articulation of these two approaches leads to confirming qualitative findings on an agent's cognitive activity and to proposing general cognitive principles that would explain a single agent's mental navigation through the abstraction hierarchy.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 01/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Despite its extensive and successful use in the human factors specialist's work, there remain challenges for the development of task analysis. One such challenge is posed by the need to capture the features of the dynamic, complex tasks that take place in modern socio-technical systems. In this paper, we discuss the theoretical and practical implications of using perceptual control theory (PCT) as a theoretical grounding for task analysis. In particular, we describe the ability of PCT to combine the notion of perceptual control (which is similar to the assumptions underlying ecological design) with that of feedback control (which is fundamental to some traditional task analysis approaches). We describe some of the current PCT-based task analysis methods before introducing a new method that aims to integrate PCT concepts into hierarchical task analysis. Finally, we demonstrate how this method might be applied to a real-world dynamic control task.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 01/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Automation has the potential to aid humans with a diverse set of tasks and support overall system performance. Automated systems are not always reliable, and when automation errs, humans must engage in error management, which is the process of detecting, understanding and correcting errors. However, this process of error management in the context of human–automation interaction is not well understood. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of the variables that contribute to error management. We examined relevant research in human–automation interaction and human error to identify critical automation, person, task and emergent variables. We propose a framework for management of automation errors to incorporate and build upon previous models. Further, our analysis highlights variables that may be addressed through design and training to positively influence error management. Additional efforts to understand the error-management process will contribute to automation designed and implemented to support safe and effective system performance.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 01/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the several studies reported here was to improve the lighting conditions at industrial visual testing and inspection workplaces beyond the specifications given in technical standards. In this context, special emphasis was laid on the examination of the effects of directional and diffuse lighting as well as of sample-specific lighting scenarios with respect to the ability to detect three-dimensional (3D) details. The sample-specific lighting scenarios were designed according to ergonomic principles and adapted to different material surfaces. Landolt rings of various sizes were laser-engraved on several surface types, which are representative of the surfaces encountered in industrial final inspection tasks. The sample surfaces were fixed in a special object mount, which allowed defined and reproducible test arrangements. In a first step, the luminance distribution on the samples and the contrast between the Landolt rings and the background of the samples were measured depending on different illumination types and inclinations of the surface types. Additionally, laboratory tests were carried out in which the test subjects’ visual acuity was measured while detecting 3D details (e.g. the Landolt rings) on the surfaces of different materials illuminated in different ways. It turned out that all results were strongly dependent on the inclination of the samples rather than on the lighting scenarios applied. In a further study, the time-related performance in detecting surface flaws on samples under different lighting scenarios was measured. For this purpose, the average error quota was assessed, i.e. the proportion of wrongly identified Landolt rings among the overall number of optotypes and the response time to the identification of a presented optotype were determined. Both parameters gave evidence of the long-term advantage of the ergonomic sample-specific lighting scenarios. In a last step, the various illuminations were evaluated through a structured interview of the test subjects. The subjective assessment of the illuminations also indicated a high dependency on the geometric arrangement between light source and the sample under examination. Especially, in the context of long-term inspections, the subjects preferred the sample-specific lighting scenarios. The diffuse lighting was also assessed predominantly and positively. The illumination with directional lighting and with the lighting according to technical standards was, mostly, rated disadvantageously.
    Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science 01/2013; 14(2).