Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association (Community Pract )

Publisher: Community Practitioners' and Health Visitors' Association

Description

The Community Practitioners' and Health Visitors' Association (CPHVA) is the UK professional body that represents health visitors, school nurses, practice nurses, district nurses and other registered nurses who work in a primary or community health setting. With 18,500 members, it is the third largest professional nursing union and is the only union which has public health at its heart. Community Practitioner is the monthly, professional journal of the CPHVA and is sent free to members. It features all the latest news and features of interest to community nurses, along with articles on the professional, clinical and labour relations issues relevant to members.

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  • Website
    Community Practitioner website
  • ISSN
    1462-2815
  • OCLC
    38735949
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Domestic violence and abuse (DVA) is a serious societal and public health issue that takes place within family-type intimate relationships and forms a pattern of coercive and controlling behaviours, which can escalate over time. DVA rarely exists in isolation from other social 'ills' and can have an enormous impact on people's health and wellbeing. Recently, family violence has become more visible to health visitors and increasingly presents challenges to practice. Some are practical challenges faced by practitioners who seek to comprehend the evolving phenomenon and others involve the clinical dilemmas surrounding service delivery. The deeply vexed question is how health visitors can work towards ending the cycle of DVA, especially where there are unclear parameters between the victim and perpetrator, and when clients are accepting of, and dismissive about, DVA. The recent government strategy-based move towards greater emphasis on prevention has provided an opportunity for health visitors to intervene in DVA. In light of the nature of safeguarding responsibilities, and a wider public health role as providers of universal health services, health visitors are well placed to offer early support to families.
    Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 09/2014; 87(9).
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 09/2014; 87(9).
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 09/2014; 87(9).
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 09/2014; 87(9).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This qualitative study aimed to investigate maternal and infant health needs within Eastern European populations in Bradford. Evidence suggested that migrants from Eastern Europe had poor maternal and child health and increased rates of infant mortality. Health visitors, community midwives and specialist voluntary workers were involved. Eleven interviews took place. They were semi-structured and analysed using a thematic approach. A number of health needs were identified in Eastern European populations, including high rates of smoking and poor diet. Wider determinants of health such as poverty and poor housing were cited as commonplace for Eastern European migrants. There were numerous cultural barriers to health, such as discrimination, mobility, cultural practices regarding age at pregnancy, and disempowerment of women. Lastly, access to health services was identified as a significant issue and this was impacting on staff working with this population. This study demonstrated the complexity and interaction of health and social factors and their influence on utilisation of health services.
    Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 09/2014; 87(9).
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 09/2014; 87(9).
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 09/2014; 87(9).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article examines the effectiveness of the Time4U therapeutic group for women with postnatal depression, introduced seven years ago in Bury. The group is facilitated by a health visitor and primary care mental health nurse, and offers a combination of group therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, peer support and social support. This paper analyses the scores and evaluations of the mothers who attended in 2012 and shows that the mothers' depression, anxiety and social functioning improved. The reasons for the group's success are discussed and include partnership working between community services, primary mental health services and children's centres.
    Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 09/2014; 87(9).
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 08/2014; 87(8).
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 08/2014; 87(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper highlights resilience as a key concept when working with young children to improve their emotional wellbeing and reduce anxieties. Supporting children aged 4–7 years with anxiety is a significant area of advancement in terms of therapeutic approaches over the last decade. This paper outlines one such approach that was implemented within a Tier 2 Community Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) within the northern region of England to determine whether findings from Australian studies could be replicated in the UK. A pilot study was undertaken with a group of young children aged 4–7 years old with symptoms of anxiety. All of the children had been referred to the service because of anxiety related issues, such as social phobia, generalised anxiety disorder and obsessive–compulsive disorder. They received a group intervention, FUN FRIENDS, over a period of 12 weeks. By enabling the children to become more self-sufficient this allowed greater emotional and social skills development. All the children demonstrated improved anxiety scores post intervention, as measured by the Spence Child Anxiety Scale.
    Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 08/2014; 87(8).
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 08/2014; 87(8).
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 08/2014; 87(8).
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 08/2014; 87(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Like the UK, Australia has a number of school nursing models and programmes. The School Based Youth Health Nurse Program (SBYHNP) is a new and unique model of school nursing in Queensland, Australia. The SBYHNP represents a philosophical and structural shift from traditional school nursing programmes. The purpose of this qualitative case study is to explore the reasons School Based Youth Health Nurses (SBYHN) leave school nursing. Sixteen in-depth interviews were conducted with participants who practised as SBYHN and left the SBYHNP. The case study suggests nurses considering school nursing as a specialty should seek opportunity to understand this complex role, ensure realistic expectations and undertake relevant qualifications. This approach may secure the investment made by nurses and schools and create demand for a highly sought after position.
    Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 08/2014; 87(8).
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 08/2014; 87(8).
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 08/2014; 87(8).
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 07/2014; 87(7):12.
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 07/2014; 87(7):12.
  • Community practitioner: the journal of the Community Practitioners' & Health Visitors' Association 07/2014; 87(7):3.

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