Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health (J Paediatr Child Health )

Publisher: Royal Australasian College of Physicians, Blackwell Publishing

Description

Official Journal of the Division of Paediatrics (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians)In association with The Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand, The Paediatric Research Society of Australia and the Australasian Association of Paediatric Surgeons. The Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health draws together both the formal aspects of paediatric medicine and surgery and the broader fields of child health, covering general paediatrics, perinatal medicine, paediatric surgery and community paediatrics. Original research articles, clinical studies and case reports are published as well as invited annotations on current topics, review articles, editorial comments, policy statements on child care and a comprehensive book review section.

  • Impact factor
    1.25
  • 5-year impact
    1.43
  • Cited half-life
    7.60
  • Immediacy index
    0.24
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.45
  • Website
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health website
  • Other titles
    Journal of paediatrics and child health (Online), Journal of pediatrics and child health, Paediatrics and child health
  • ISSN
    1440-1754
  • OCLC
    44974418
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Blackwell Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Some journals impose embargoes typically of 6 or 12 months, occasionally of 24 months
    • no listing of affected journals available as yet
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • Publisher version cannot be used
    • On author or institutional or subject-based server
    • Server must be non-commercial
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with set statement ("The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com ")
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'Blackwell Publishing' is an imprint of 'Wiley-Blackwell'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: AimsThis study aimed to collect data on Australian children with regard to feeding difficulties using a standardised questionnaire, compare these data to international data collected using the same tool, assess the short-term reliability of this tool and determine the sensitivity and specificity of this tool in detecting feeding difficulties.Methods Parents completed the Behavioral Pediatric Feeding Assessment Scale. Data on 54 typically developing children and 81 children with feeding difficulties aged 2–6 years are presented.ResultsOur Australian sample performed comparably to normative data from Canada and the UK. Reliable results were demonstrated over a 2-week period, and the scale was shown to have high specificity. There was a significant difference between typically developing children and children with feeding difficulties in frequency of undesirable mealtime behaviours (P < 0.01) and the number of behaviours reported as a problem by parents using this tool (P < 0.01).Conclusions This study confirmed that the Behavioral Pediatric Feeding Assessment Scale is a valid tool for identifying Australian children with feeding difficulties. Given that it is simple to administer and has a high reliability and specificity, it is suggested as a useful screening tool for physicians working with young children. Data collected using this tool found that typically developing children display few undesirable feeding behaviours, and few behaviours are perceived as problems by parents. Therefore, any child presenting with a large number of feeding problems on this parent-reported measure should be referred for further multidisciplinary evaluation and treatment as required.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: AimTo provide an overview of the health and well-being of sexual minority high school students in New Zealand, investigate differences between sexual minority youth (SMY) and exclusively opposite-sex-attracted youth (EOSAY), and examine changes across survey waves.Methods Nationally representative cross-sectional surveys were completed in 2001 (n = 9011), 2007 (n = 8002) and 2012 (n = 8167). Logistic regressions were used to examine the associations between selected outcomes and sexual attraction across survey waves.ResultsSMY accounted for 6% of participants in all three waves, with a greater proportion being ‘out’ in 2012 (P < 0.0001). SMY were more likely to work as volunteers (OR = 1.37) than EOSAY, and the majority of SMY reported good general health, liking school and having caring friends. With the exceptions of binge drinking and being driven dangerously by someone, SMY reported comparatively diminished health and well-being relative to EOSAY. Increasing proportions of SMY had depressive symptoms from 2001 (OR = 2.38) to 2012 (OR = 3.73) compared with EOSAY. There were some differences between the sexes; female SMY were less likely to report positive family relationships (OR = 0.59) and liking school (OR = 0.55), and they were more likely to have been hit (2012 OR = 1.95) than female EOSAY. Male SMY reported especially high rates of suicide attempts (2012 OR = 5.64) compared with male EOSAY.Conclusions Health services, schools, communities and families must be more responsive to the needs of SMY to ensure that disparities are addressed.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Children with severe acute malnutrition complicated by diarrhoea require special care due to their unique physiological vulnerability and increased mortality risks. A systematic literature review (1950–2013) was conducted to identify the most effective diagnostic and therapeutic measures for the community-based management of severely malnourished children with diarrhoea. No studies directly addressed this question, so the search was broadened to include inpatient care. Of the 129 studies identified, 32 were selected for full review and found to contain varying degrees of indirectness, inconsistency and bias. Evidence from diagnostic studies point to the use of both prolonged and persistent diarrhoea as morbidity markers, rapid hypoglycaemia diagnosis and the frequent aetiological role of Cryptosporidium. Therapeutic studies suggest benefits from routine antiparasitic medication and feeding regimens with ready-to-use-therapeutic foods, lactose-free diets and zinc supplementation. Existing rehydration treatment guidelines were affirmed, but the utility of glutamine and low osmolarity feeds were inconclusive.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 10/2014;
  • Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: AimTo describe fundamental movement skills (FMS), physical fitness and level of physical activity among Australian children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and compare this with healthy peers.Methods Children aged 6–16 years with JIA were recruited from hospital rheumatology clinics and private rheumatology rooms in Sydney, Australia. All children attended an assessment day, where FMS were assessed by a senior paediatric physiotherapist, physical fitness was assessed using the multistage 20-metre shuttle run test, and physical activity and physical and psychosocial well-being were assessed with questionnaires. These results were compared with age- and gender-matched peers from the NSW Schools Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey and the Health of Young Victorians Study using logistic regression analysis.ResultsTwenty-eight children with JIA participated in this study. There were no differences in the proportion of children who had mastered FMS between children with JIA and their healthy peers (P > 0.05). However, there was a trend for children with JIA to have poorer physical fitness and be less physically active than healthy peers. Parents of children with JIA indicated more physical and psychosocial impairments among their children and themselves compared with parents of healthy children (P < 0.05).Conclusions This is the first study in Australia to compare FMS, physical activity and fitness in children with JIA and their peers. While older children with JIA appear to have poorer physical fitness and physical activity levels than their peers, there is no difference in FMS.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: AimThis study aims to investigate the association between daytime physical activity (PA) and sleep in pre-schoolers with or without autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).Method Thirty-one pre-school children with ASD and 16 age-matched controls were recruited. Sleep and PA patterns were measured with an Actiwatch for 7 days. After average PA values were calculated for three periods (morning, afternoon and evening) of each day for each child, the days with maximum (active) and minimum (inactive) PA values for these three periods were determined. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare sleep following active mornings, afternoons and evenings with that following inactive time periods.ResultsIn control children, sleep onset time following active mornings/afternoons did not differ from that following inactive mornings/afternoons. In contrast, sleep onset following the most inactive morning (median sleep onset time: 9:57 pm) and the most inactive afternoon (median sleep onset time: 10:24 pm) began significantly later than that following the most active mornings (median sleep onset time: 9:21 pm) and the most active afternoons (median sleep onset time: 9:39 pm) in children with ASD. The percentage of sleep for control children following active mornings was significantly higher (median: 93.2%) than that following inactive ones (median: 91.7%). Significant associations were not found between evening PA and sleep in either ASD or control children.ConclusionsA high level of morning and afternoon PA can advance the sleep phase in children with ASD.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: AimPreterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) requiring surfactant treatment are often retrieved mechanically ventilated to the receiving hospital. INSURE (INtubate, SURfactant, Extubate) technique is not routinely performed by Newborn and Pediatric Emergency Transport Services NSW (NETS) during retrieval. This study aims to evaluate the likelihood of using INSURE technique during retrieval. We attempted to study the clinical characteristics of preterm infants with RDS who were favourably extubated (FE) shortly after admission to the receiving hospital.Methods Retrospective study of preterm infants, gestational age (GA) > 28 weeks with RDS requiring retrieval by NETS.ResultsTwo hundred twenty-three infants, median GA of 33 weeks (range 29–36), median birthweight 2200 g (1000–4080) were examined. A percentage of 49.7 received CPAP, and 50.3% required MV. Eighteen (16%) infants were FE (<6 h) at receiving hospital. FiO2 on stabilisation (FiO2(st)) by NETS correlated with FiO2 on admission to receiving hospital (r = 0.863). A percentage of 81 of ventilated infants received premedications including morphine. No significant differences were noted for GA, stabilisation ventilator settings, surfactant dose (mean 155 mg/kg) and mode of transport between FE and non-FE groups. FiO2(st) post-surfactant treatment was significantly lower in FE compared with non-FE group (mean 0.28 vs. 0.41 respectively). The area under the curve from receiver operating characteristic based on FiO2(st) was 0.646 (P = 0.050), the sensitivity and specificity of FiO2(st) cut-off points (between 0.25 and 0.30) was low.Conclusion FiO2 on stabilisation post-surfactant treatment has a weak predictive value and may not be adequate to be used as sole criteria to extubate to CPAP prior to transport. FiO2 at stabilisation should be included as an eligibility criteria for a randomised trial of INSURE during retrieval, but other clinical assessments are needed.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: AimNeonatal intubation is a technically challenging procedure, and pressure-related injuries to surrounding structures have been reported. The primary objective of this study was to determine the pressure exerted on the upper jaw during tracheal intubation using a neonatal mannequin.Method Multidisciplinary care providers working at a neonatal intensive care unit were requested to intubate a neonatal mannequin using the standard laryngoscope and 3.0-mm (internal diameter) endotracheal tube. Compression force exerted was measured by using pressure-sensitive film taped on the upper jaw before every intubation attempt. Pressure, area under pressure and time taken to intubate were compared between the different types of health-care professionals.ResultsThirty care providers intubated the mannequin three times each. Pressure impressions were observed on the developer film after every intubation attempt (n = 90). The mean pressure exerted during intubation across all health-care providers was 568 kPa (SD 78). The mean area placed under pressure was 142 mm2 (SD 45), and the mean time taken for intubation was 14.7 s (SD 4.3). There was no difference in pressure exerted on the upper jaw between frequent and less frequent intubators. It was found that pressure greater than 400 kPa was inadvertently applied on the upper jaw during neonatal intubation, far exceeding the 250 kPa shown to cause tissue injury in animal models.Conclusion The upper jaw is exposed to a significant compression force during intubation. Although such exposure is brief, it has the potential to cause tissue injury. Contact of the laryngoscope blade with the upper jaw occurred in all intubation attempts with the currently used design of laryngoscope.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 09/2014;
  • Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 09/2014; 50(9).
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    ABSTRACT: AimsTo describe outcome and examine factors associated with mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children in Malaysia after anti-retroviral therapy (ART).Methods Retrospective and prospective data collected through March 2009 from children in four different states in Malaysia enrolled in TREAT Asia's Pediatric HIV Observational Database were analysed.ResultsOf 347 children in the cohort, only 278 (80.1%) were commenced on ART. The median CD4 count and median age at baseline prior to ART was 272 cells/μL and 4.2 years (interquartile range (IQR): 1.4, 7.4 years), respectively. The median duration of follow-up was 3.7 years (IQR: 1.8, 6.0) with 32 deaths giving a crude mortality rate of 2.86 per 100 child-years. The mortality rate highest in the first 6 months of ART was 10.62 per 100 child-years and declined to 1.83 per 100 child-years thereafter. On univariate analyses, only baseline median CD4 percentage, weight for age z score, height for age z score and anaemia were significantly associated with mortality. Upon including all four of these predictors into a single multivariate model, only weight for age z score remained statistically significantly predictive of mortality.Conclusions Children commenced on ART had high mortality in the first 6 months especially in those with low CD4 percentage, wasting and anaemia. Poor nutritional status is an important independent predictor of mortality in this study. Besides initiating ART therapy, nutritional support and intervention must receive the utmost attention.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 09/2014;
  • Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 09/2014; 50(9).
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    ABSTRACT: Subgaleal haemorrhage (SGH) is an important cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in the neonate. Its increased prevalence in recent years has coincided with the rise in the number of births assisted by vacuum extraction. Three deaths in Australia within the last 7 years have been the subject of two coronial inquests. Subsequent coronial reports have highlighted that neonatal death from SGH can be prevented if appropriate attention is paid to identification of risk factors, early diagnosis, close observation and aggressive treatment. To prevent unnecessary deaths, all involved in the care of the baby after birth need to be aware of the importance of prompt diagnosis, monitoring and early treatment of SGH.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This standards document outlines accepted standards of management for children, adolescents and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Australia. This document acknowledges that the chronic inflammatory arthritis conditions (JIA) in childhood are different diseases from inflammatory arthritis in adults and that specific expertise is required in the care of children with arthritis.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 09/2014; 50(9).
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    ABSTRACT: Congenital dermal sinus (CDS) and occult spinal dysraphism are suspected when a cutaneous marker overlies the spine of a newborn. CDS can have the appearance of a simple dimple and occur within the gluteal cleft without any skin markers. CDS are the commonest cause of intramedullary spinal cord abscess.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is a common, usually mild childhood illness caused by enteroviruses. Over the last five years, coxsackievirus A6 has been identified as a causative agent in outbreaks in Europe, South-East Asia and America. It has an atypical presentation compared with other enteroviruses, with more widespread rash, larger blisters and subsequent skin peeling and/or nail shedding. We give the first description of an outbreak of coxsackievirus A6 in New Zealand and how health-care communication networks enabled detection of and dissemination of information about this emergent strain.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: AimsTo describe the rate of early- and late-onset sepsis in neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit at the Royal Women's Hospital and to compare the rate of late-onset sepsis (LOS) with a published (2008) cohort from the same unit. The secondary aim was to examine clinicians' compliance with antibiotic guidelines.Methods Infants born <32 weeks' gestation or <1500 g admitted between 1 July 2011 and 31 December 2011 were included. Strict definitions of sepsis and compliance with antibiotic guidelines were applied.ResultsOne hundred and seventy-two infants met the inclusion criteria, with 152 having blood culture evaluations for early-onset sepsis (EOS) and 58 having 109 evaluations for LOS. Definite EOS occurred in 1.3% with Escherichia coli isolated. The rate of definite LOS in 2011 of 22% was not significantly different than the 27% in 2008, with coagulase-negative staphylococcus the main isolate. Antibiotic continuation beyond 72 h in infants with negative blood cultures was the main reason for non-compliance with antibiotic guidelines.Conclusions The rate of EOS is comparable with published reports and the rate of LOS has remained stable over a 3-year period. Discontinuation of antibiotics with negative septic markers and blood cultures at 48–72 h is encouraged.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 09/2014;
  • Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 09/2014; 50(9).

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