Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health (J Paediatr Child Health )

Publisher: Royal Australasian College of Physicians, Blackwell Publishing

Description

Official Journal of the Division of Paediatrics (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians)In association with The Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand, The Paediatric Research Society of Australia and the Australasian Association of Paediatric Surgeons. The Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health draws together both the formal aspects of paediatric medicine and surgery and the broader fields of child health, covering general paediatrics, perinatal medicine, paediatric surgery and community paediatrics. Original research articles, clinical studies and case reports are published as well as invited annotations on current topics, review articles, editorial comments, policy statements on child care and a comprehensive book review section.

Impact factor 1.19

  • Hide impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.43
  • Cited half-life
    7.60
  • Immediacy index
    0.24
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.45
  • Website
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health website
  • Other titles
    Journal of paediatrics and child health (Online), Journal of pediatrics and child health, Paediatrics and child health
  • ISSN
    1440-1754
  • OCLC
    44974418
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Blackwell Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Some journals impose embargoes typically of 6 or 12 months, occasionally of 24 months
    • no listing of affected journals available as yet
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's server, institutional server or subject-based server
    • Server must be non-commercial
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with set statement ("The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com")
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'Blackwell Publishing' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: AimThis paper describes the Toddlers at Risk of Autism Clinic (TRAC), which utilises the Social Attention and Communication Study (SACS) and/or Autism Detection in Early Childhood (ADEC) play-based assessments to facilitate the early diagnosis of autism.MethodsA retrospective audit was conducted of all 42 children assessed over a 3-year period in the TRAC. A semi-structured interview and play-based assessment (SACS and ADEC) were used to aid experienced clinicians in diagnosing autism. Intervention was recommended, and families were routinely followed up. Analysis was conducted on the tools used, the outcomes of assessment, diagnosis and stability of diagnosis on follow-up.ResultsDuring this period, 35 boys and 7 girls were assessed, with a mean age of 25 months. The average waiting time for clinic was 11.6 weeks. Twenty-five patients were diagnosed with autism; 90.5% of toddlers given an initial diagnosis retained that diagnosis at follow-up. Out of the 17 children who were not diagnosed with autism in the TRAC, one child was later diagnosed with autism.Conclusion Experienced clinicians can use the SACS and/or ADEC to assist with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual diagnosis of autism in toddlers.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 02/2015;
  • Louise S Conwell, Ristan M Greer, Kristen A Neville, Lisa A Amato, Louise Campbell, Frank Fiumara
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 02/2015;
  • James P Fitzpatrick, Jane Latimer, Maureen Carter, June Oscar, Manuela L Ferreira, Heather Carmichael Olson, Barbara R Lucas, Robyn Doney, Claire Salter, Julianne Try, Genevieve Hawkes, Emily Fitzpatrick, Marmingee Hand, Rochelle E Watkins, Alexandra LC Martiniuk, Carol Bower, John Boulton, Elizabeth J Elliott
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    ABSTRACT: AimAboriginal leaders concerned about high rates of alcohol use in pregnancy invited researchers to determine the prevalence of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and partial fetal alcohol syndrome (pFAS) in their communities.Methods Population-based prevalence study using active case ascertainment in children born in 2002/2003 and living in the Fitzroy Valley, in Western Australia (April 2010–November 2011) (n = 134). Socio-demographic and antenatal data, including alcohol use in pregnancy, were collected by interview with 127/134 (95%) consenting parents/care givers. Maternal/child medical records were reviewed. Interdisciplinary assessments were conducted for 108/134 (81%) children. FAS/pFAS prevalence was determined using modified Canadian diagnostic guidelines.ResultsIn 127 pregnancies, alcohol was used in 55%. FAS or pFAS was diagnosed in 13/108 children, a prevalence of 120 per 1000 (95% confidence interval 70–196). Prenatal alcohol exposure was confirmed for all children with FAS/pFAS, 80% in the first trimester and 50% throughout pregnancy. Ten of 13 mothers had Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores and all drank at a high-risk level. Of children with FAS/pFAS, 69% had microcephaly, 85% had weight deficiency and all had facial dysmorphology and central nervous system abnormality/impairment in three to eight domains.Conclusions The population prevalence of FAS/pFAS in remote Aboriginal communities of the Fitzroy Valley is the highest reported in Australia and similar to that reported in high-risk populations internationally. Results are likely to be generalisable to other age groups in the Fitzroy Valley and other remote Australian communities with high-risk alcohol use during pregnancy. Prevention of FAS/pFAS is an urgent public health challenge.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: This study aims to determine factors impacting the parental burden in immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated food-allergic children (FAC), focusing on attitudes towards adrenaline autoinjectors (AAIs). Questionnaires were sent to parents of diagnosed IgE-mediated FAC attending follow-up allergy clinic appointments at two Sydney hospitals in May-September 2013. The questionnaires ascertained parental attitudes, confidence and knowledge regarding AAIs and included the validated, Food Allergy Quality of Life-Parental Burden (FAQL-PB) questionnaire. The response rate was 68%. Of FAC, 62% were male aged 1-17 years (median 6.0). There was a high proportion of children with multiple food allergies (52% allergic to >2 foods), coexistant eczema (85%) and asthma (54%). Sixty-three per cent reported a past history of anaphylaxis and 42% reported reactions in the last 6 months. AAI had been prescribed for 84%. FAC with a history of anaphylaxis were more likely to have had an AAI prescribed (P < 0.0001). There was no difference in FAQL-PB mean scores with age or AAI prescription status. The PB score was greater if the parent had administered the AAI (P = 0.02) and where the child was allergic to >2 foods (P < 0.0001).The Ninety per cent of parents reported that the AAI increased or did not change the child's quality of life, the family or FACs freedom. Three per cent of parents whose FAC children were prescribed an AAI reported increased stress related to AAI prescription. Severity of food allergy, number of food allergens and past anaphylaxis rather than prescription of an AAI appear to be major influences on parental burden. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: This study aims to explore carer perceptions of training in out-of-hospital use of buccal midazolam for emergency management of seizures. A random sample of 100 families (from n = 198) who underwent training at the Sydney Children's Hospitals Network, Randwick campus (2008-2012) were invited to participate in a telephone questionnaire. Sixty-three carers participated. Thirty-three children were female, median age at training was 4 years and seizure onset 2.75 years. Seizures were generalised in 26 children and focal in 37. Common reasons for prescription included history of prolonged seizures (38%), recent diagnosis of epilepsy (33%) and overseas travel (11%). Ninety-eight per cent of carers reported that training instructions were clear, and 94% reported the risks of using benzodiazepines were satisfactorily explained. Ninety per cent felt confident to administer the drug following training and 62% completed first aid training as recommended. Suggestions for improvement included follow-up/review and additional demonstration/practice. Twenty-one carers (33%) reported giving buccal midazolam a median five times, 67% reported it was effective in terminating the seizure and 71% called an ambulance as instructed. Problems reported in administration included excessive secretions and difficulties drawing up the solution. One child experienced breathing difficulties requiring oxygen by the paramedics. Four children were admitted to children's intensive care unit with status epilepticus requiring intubation. Training for out-of-hospital use of buccal midazolam was considered valuable by carers. Only a third of the sample subsequently used midazolam. Half of these carers reported problems in administration and one reported respiratory difficulty. These results highlight the importance of drug safety and efficacious training programmes. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Many advances and challenges have occurred in the field of paediatric infectious diseases during the past 50 years. It is impossible to cover all of these in a short review, but a few highlights and lowlights will be covered. These include virtual disappearance of some infectious diseases, emergence of new ones, infections in the immunocompromised, antimicrobial resistance, development of new and improved antimicrobials, improved diagnostic tests and the Human Microbiome Project. © 2015 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder and one of the main diagnoses seen by general paediatricians today. Despite the impression often portrayed in the media, it is not a new condition; in fact it has been described for over 200 years. The past 50 years has seen a progressive increase in our understanding of the underlying neurocognitive deficits in ADHD, and over the past 20 years behavioural genetics and neuroimaging studies have shed light on the complex causal factors and neurobiological processes operating. The plethora of ADHD research has advanced our knowledge of the condition, but so far has had little impact on improving clinical practice. Stimulant medication has been the mainstay of symptomatic treatment for over 30 years; however, it is still unclear how developmental trajectories can be modified to achieve best outcomes. It is hoped that novel therapies and more individualised management will evolve over the coming decades. © 2015 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015; 51(1):69-73.
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    ABSTRACT: Rotavirus, the commonest cause of severe dehydrating gastroenteritis world-wide, was discovered less than 50 years ago. It causes about 450 000 deaths per year in children <5 years of age and hospitalises millions more. Rotavirus vaccines have been shown to have a major impact on hospital admissions due to rotavirus gastroenteritis and all-cause gastroenteritis and reduce mortality in developing countries. In Australia, there has been a 71% decrease in rotavirus hospitalisations in children 0-5 years of age. From the discovery of rotavirus as the major causative agent for severe gastroenteritis, through vaccine development and vaccine post-marketing surveillance activities, Australian scientists and clinicians have played a significant role in the global effort to reduce the burden of rotavirus infection. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015; 51(1):34-9.
  • Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Medicine has seen dramatic changes in the last 50 years, and vaccinology is no different. Australia has made a significant contribution to world knowledge on vaccine-preventable diseases. Certain deadly diseases have disappeared or become rare in Australia following successful introduction of vaccines. As diseases become rarer, public knowledge about the diseases and their serious consequences has decreased, and concerns about potential vaccine side effects have increased. To maintain confidence in immunisations, sharing of detailed information about the vaccines and the diseases we are trying to prevent is integral to the continued success of our public health programme. Modern quality immunisation programmes need to communicate complex information to immunisation providers and also to the general community. Improving immunisation coverage rates and eliminating the gap in coverage and timeliness between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous people has become a high priority. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015; 51(1):16-20.
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    ABSTRACT: The last 50 years in allergy could almost be considered the first 50 years. Over this time period, we have witnessed the emergence of allergy as a subspecialty, have seen and continue to observe a tremendous change in prevalence of allergic disease and have gained insight into the mechanisms that underlie allergic predisposition and disease manifestation. We have improved the care of children with many forms of allergic disease and now sit poised to be able to alter the natural history of allergic disease with the use of specific immunotherapy. There is much left to do in the next 50 years including understanding what underlies both the predisposition to atopic disease and its natural resolution and identifying the environmental cofactors involved in the ‘allergic epidemic’ and therefore targets for effective primary prevention.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015; 51(1).
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    ABSTRACT: One of the notable shifts in Paediatrics across the last 50 years has been towards disorders that are chronic and qualitative in nature. In addition to physical health, these impact on childhood development, behaviour and wellbeing. Understanding and management of these problems extends the traditional biological toolkit of paediatrics into the complexities of uncertainties of psychological and social context. In Australasia, the profession has responded with the development of Community Paediatrics as a recognised sub-specialty, of which Neurodevelopmental and Behavioural Paediatrics is an important component. These developments are reviewed along with consideration of future challenges for this field of health care. © 2015 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015; 51(1):113-7.
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    ABSTRACT: One of the great success stories of modern medicine is undoubtedly the remarkable improvement in outcome for childhood cancer, achieved through the work of the co-operative groups enrolling patients in randomised controlled trials. In 1965, survival was almost zero; now 5-year survival rates exceed 80% in high-income countries. The lessons learned in the care of patients with the most common malignancy in childhood - acute lymphoblastic leukaemia - have been used in all other cancers of childhood and more recently in the management of adults. These lessons can be broadly applied in medical practice, because elements of laboratory science in all branches of pathology, as well as a deep understanding of biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology, genetics and molecular science, run through this story. Far from being a sad area of practice, paediatric haematology and oncology remains the champion of embedded clinical and translational research, diagnosis from bench to bedside and lifelong multidisciplinary management of the child and their family. © 2015 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015; 51(1):78-81.
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    ABSTRACT: Newborn screening has evolved fast following recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of disease, particularly the development of multiplex testing and applications of molecular testing. Formal evidence of benefit from newborn screening has been largely lacking, due to the rarity of individual disorders. There are wide international differences in the choice of disorders screened, and ethical issues in both screening and not screening are apparent. More evidence is needed about benefit and harm of screening for specific disorders and renewed discussion about the basic aims of newborn screening must be undertaken. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015; 51(1):103-7.
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    ABSTRACT: In the 50 years since the first edition of this journal, operative paediatric surgery has undergone radical change. Many of the most common instruments are unchanged, both as a testament to their utility and in recognition of past surgeons remembered eponymously. Surrounding that basic core of instruments, theatre has changed radically as new tools and techniques have arisen. Surgeons have come down from their pedestals, recognising surgery as a team sport rather than a solo performance. More than half of the current paediatric surgical trainees are women, a higher proportion than in any other craft group of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. The appearance, and rapid development, of laparoscopy is to many observers the most notable change in surgery over the last 50 years. Placed in its context though, it is simply the most prominent example of a frameshift in surgical thinking. The patient as a whole is now the focus, rather than just the disease. Recent developments are as much about minimising harm to normal tissues as they are about extirpating pathology. As a surgical maxim, ‘Primum non nocere’ is even more in evidence in 2015 than it was in 1965.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015; 51(1).
  • Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015; 51(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Epidemiological, developmental and pathological research over the last 40 years has done much to unravel the enigma of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) that has afflicted the human condition for millennia. Modifications in infant care practices based on the avoidance of risk factors identified from a consistent epidemiological profile across time and multiple locations have resulted in dramatic reductions in the incidence of SUDI and SIDS in particular. The definition of SIDS (or unexplained SUDI) has been continually refined allowing enhanced multidisciplinary research, results of which can be more reliably compared between investigators. These latter expanded definitions mandating death scene investigations, evaluation of the circumstances of death and more comprehensive autopsies including additional ancillary testing have illuminated the importance of life-threatening sleep environments. The triple-risk hypothesis for SIDS has been increasingly validated and formulates an inextricable relationship between an infant's state of development, underlying pathological vulnerability and an unsafe sleep environment for sudden infant death to occur. Today, the major risk factors for SUDI are maternal smoking and bed sharing, and the challenge is to implement effective strategies that will reduce the exposure to such risks as was done with prone sleeping position. The challenges ahead include development of clinical methods and/or laboratory testing that will accurately identify which infants are at particularly high risk of SIDS but also means by which their deaths can be prevented. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015; 51(1):108-12.
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    ABSTRACT: It is not inconceivable that by 2035 the substantial gaps in child health across the Pacific can close significantly. Currently, Australia and New Zealand have child mortality rates of 5 and 6 per 1000 live births, respectively, while Pacific island developing nations have under 5 mortality rates ranging from 13 to 16 (Vanuatu, Fiji and Tonga) to 47 and 58 per 1000 live births (Kiribati and Papua New Guinea, respectively). However, these Pacific child mortality rates are falling, by an average of 1.4% per year since 1990, and more rapidly (1.9% per year) since 2000. Based on progress elsewhere, there is a need to (i) define the specific things needed to close the gaps in child health; (ii) be far more ambitious and hopeful than ever before; and (iii) form a new regional compact based on solidarity and interdependence. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015; 51(1):54-60.
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    ABSTRACT: In 1965, when the first issue of Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health appeared, medical ethics was just becoming established as a discipline. The sub-speciality of paediatric ethics did not make an appearance until the late 1980s, with the first key texts appearing in the 1990s. Professional concern to practice ethically in paediatrics obviously goes much further back than that, even if not named as such. In clinical areas of paediatrics, the story of the last 50 years is essentially a story of progress – better understanding of disease, better diagnosis, more effective treatment, better outcomes. In paediatric ethics, the story of the last 50 years is a bit more complicated. In ethics, the idea of progress, rather than just change, is not so straightforward and is sometimes hotly contested. There has certainly been change, including some quite radical shifts in attitudes and practices, but on some issues, the ethical debate now looks remarkably similar to that of 40–50 years ago. This is the story of some things that have changed in paediatric ethics, some things that have stayed the same and the key ethical ideas lying beneath the surface.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015; 51(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Let's face it. There is no way of writing about the last half century of genetics without getting a little bit excitable. All of the terms in the title of this piece have been used by otherwise level-headed geneticists to describe the pace of change in genetics over the past few years. The thing is – they are right. Genetics is moving faster and faster. Five years ago, few people would have predicted that we would be where we are today. Five years from now, presumably, it will seem like 2015 was some kind of Dark Age when nothing much was happening. So it would be easy to lose perspective on the achievements of the past, or to assume that nothing much was happening in genetics until recently. However, everything that is happening in genetics now rests on the foundations built up over the past century, and particularly the past half century. And through that time, this journal has been a part of that story.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 01/2015; 51(1).