Planta (Planta )

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Description

Planta publishes original articles and invited reviews in all aspects of plant biology particularly in molecular and cell biology ultrastructure biochemistry metabolism growth development and morphogenesis ecological and environmental physiology biotechnology plant-microorganism interactions. Preference is given to experimental articles and articles serving as the basis for experimental work.

  • Impact factor
    3.35
  • 5-year impact
    3.65
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.47
  • Eigenfactor
    0.02
  • Article influence
    1.00
  • Website
    Planta website
  • Other titles
    Planta (Online)
  • ISSN
    1432-2048
  • OCLC
    39973170
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors own final version only can be archived
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's website or institutional repository
    • On funders designated website/repository after 12 months at the funders request or as a result of legal obligation
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Comparative proteomic analyses were performed to detail the evolutionary consequences of strong directional selection for enhanced fiber traits in modern upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). Using two complementary proteomic approaches, 2-DE and iTRAQ LC-MS/MS, fiber proteomes were examined for four representative stages of fiber development. Approximately 1,000 protein features were characterized using each strategy, collectively resulting in the identification and functional categorization of 1,223 proteins. Unequal contributions of homoeologous proteins were detected for over a third of the fiber proteome, but overall expression was balanced with respect to the genome-of-origin in the allopolyploid G. hirsutum. About 30 % of the proteins were differentially expressed during fiber development within wild and domesticated cotton. Notably, domestication was accompanied by a doubling of protein developmental dynamics for the period between 10 and 20 days following pollination. Expression levels of 240 iTRAQ proteins and 293 2-DE spots were altered by domestication, collectively representing multiple cellular and metabolic processes, including metabolism, energy, protein synthesis and destination, defense and stress response. Analyses of homoeolog-specific expression indicate that duplicated gene products in cotton fibers can be differently regulated in response to selection. These results demonstrate the power of proteomics for the analysis of crop domestication and phenotypic evolution.
    Planta 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Previous research suggested that the polar and temperate populations of the kelp Saccharina latissima represent different ecotypes. The ecotypic differentiation might also be reflected in their biochemical composition (BC) under changing temperatures and pCO2. Accordingly, it was tested if the BC of Arctic (Spitsbergen) and temperate S. latissima (Helgoland) is different and if they are differently affected by changes in temperature and pCO2. Thalli from Helgoland grown at 17 °C and 10 °C and from Spitsbergen at 10 °C and 4 °C were all tested at either 380, 800, or 1,500 µatm pCO2, and total C-, total N-, protein, soluble carbohydrate, and lipid content, as well as C/N-ratio were measured. At 10 °C, the Arctic population had a higher content of total C, soluble carbohydrates, and lipids, whereas the N- and protein content was lower. At the lower tested temperature, the Arctic ecotype had particularly higher contents of lipids, while content of soluble carbohydrates increased in the Helgoland population only. In Helgoland-thalli, elevated pCO2 caused a higher content of soluble carbohydrates at 17 °C but lowered the content of N and lipids and increased the C/N-ratio at 10 °C. Elevated pCO2 alone did not affect the BC of the Spitsbergen population. Conclusively, the Arctic ecotype was more resilient to increased pCO2 than the temperate one, and both ecotypes differed in their response pattern to temperature. This differential pattern is discussed in the context of the adaptation of the Arctic ecotype to low temperature and the polar night.
    Planta 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Plant pathogens deploy an array of virulence factors to suppress host defense and promote pathogenicity. Numerous strains of Pseudomonas syringae produce the phytotoxin coronatine (COR). A major aspect of COR function is its ability to mimic a bioactive jasmonic acid (JA) conjugate and thus target the JA-receptor COR-insensitive 1 (COI1). Biological activities of COR include stimulation of JA-signaling and consequent suppression of SA-dependent defense through antagonistic crosstalk, antagonism of stomatal closure to allow bacterial entry into the interior of plant leaves, contribution to chlorotic symptoms in infected plants, and suppression of plant cell wall defense through perturbation of secondary metabolism. Here, we review the virulence function of COR, including updates on these established activities as well as more recent findings revealing COI1-independent activity of COR and shedding light on cooperative or redundant defense suppression between COR and type III effector proteins.
    Planta 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In plants, the composition and organization of the cell wall determine cell shape, enable cell expansion, and affect the properties of woody tissues. Cellulose synthase (CesA) genes encode the enzymes involved in the synthesis of cellulose which is the major component of plant primary and secondary cell walls. Here, we isolated a full-length PtoCesA3 cDNA from the stem cambium tissue of Populus tomentosa. Tissue-specific expression profiling showed that PtoCesA3 is highly expressed during primary cell wall formation. Estimation of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity and linkage disequilibrium (LD) revealed that PtoCesA3 harbors high SNP diversity (π T = 0.00995 and θ w = 0.0102) and low LD (r (2) ≥ 0.1, within 1,280 bp). Association analysis in a P. tomentosa association population (460 individuals) showed that seven SNPs (false discovery rate Q < 0.10) and five haplotypes (Q < 0.10) were significantly associated with growth and wood properties, explaining 4.09-7.02 % of the phenotypic variance. All significant marker-trait associations were validated in at least one of the three smaller subsets (climatic regions) while five associations were repeated in the linkage population. Variation in RNA transcript abundance among genotypic classes of significant loci was also confirmed in the association or linkage populations. Identification of PtoCesA3 and examining its allelic polymorphisms using association studies open an avenue to understand the mechanism of cellulose synthesis in the primary cell wall and its effects on the properties of woody tissues.
    Planta 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mineral nutrients are distributed in a non-uniform manner in the soil. Plasticity in root responses to the availability of mineral nutrients is believed to be important for optimizing nutrient acquisition. The response of root architecture to heterogeneous nutrient availability has been documented in various plant species, and the molecular mechanisms coordinating these responses have been investigated particularly in Arabidopsis, a model dicotyledonous plant. Recently, progress has been made in describing the phenotypic plasticity of root architecture in maize, a monocotyledonous crop. This article reviews aspects of phenotypic plasticity of maize root system architecture, with special emphasis on describing (1) the development of its complex root system; (2) phenotypic responses in root system architecture to heterogeneous N availability; (3) the importance of phenotypic plasticity for N acquisition; (4) different regulation of root growth and nutrients uptake by shoot; and (5) root traits in maize breeding. This knowledge will inform breeding strategies for root traits enabling more efficient acquisition of soil resources and synchronizing crop growth demand, root resource acquisition and fertilizer application during crop growing season, thereby maximizing crop yields and nutrient-use efficiency and minimizing environmental pollution.
    Planta 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The morphological outer side of the apple fruit cuticle is markedly more strained than the inner side. This strain is released upon wax extraction. This paper investigates the effect of ablating outer and inner surfaces of isolated cuticular membranes (CM) of mature apple (Malus × domestica) fruit using cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) on the release of strain after extraction of waxes. Strain release was quantified as the decrease in area of CM discs following CAPP treatment and subsequent solvent extraction of wax. Increasing duration of CAPP treatment proportionally decreased CM mass per unit area. There was no difference in mass loss rate between CAPP treatments of outer or inner surfaces. Also, there was no difference in surface area of CMs before and after CAPP treatment. However, upon subsequent wax extraction, surface area of CMs decreased indicating the release of strain. Increasing the duration of CAPP treatment resulted in increasing strain release up to 47.7 ± 8.0 % at 20 min when CAPP was applied to the inner surface. In contrast, strain release was independent of CAPP duration averaging about 12.1 ± 0.6 % when applied to the outer surface of the CM. Our results provide evidence for a marked gradient of strain between the outer side (strained) and the inner side of the CM (not strained) of mature apple fruit.
    Planta 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Storage promotes carotenoid accumulation and converts amylochromoplasts into chromoplasts in winter squash. Such carotenoid enhancement is likely due to continuous biosynthesis along with reduced turnover and/or enhanced sequestration. Postharvest storage of fruits and vegetables is often required and frequently results in nutritional quality change. In this study, we investigated carotenoid storage plastids, carotenoid content, and its regulation during 3-month storage of winter squash butternut fruits. We showed that storage improved visual appearance of fruit flesh color from light to dark orange, and promoted continuous accumulation of carotenoids during the first 2-month storage. Such an increased carotenoid accumulation was found to be concomitant with starch breakdown, resulting in the conversion of amylochromoplasts into chromoplasts. The butternut fruits contained predominantly β-carotene, lutein, and violaxanthin. Increased ratios of β-carotene and violaxanthin to total carotenoids were noticed during the storage. Analysis of carotenoid metabolic gene expression and PSY protein level revealed a decreased expression of carotenogenic genes and PSY protein following the storage, indicating that the increased carotenoid level might not be due to increased biosynthesis. Instead, the increase likely resulted from a continuous biosynthesis with a possibly reduced turnover and/or enhanced sequestration, suggesting a complex regulation of carotenoid accumulation during fruit storage. This study provides important information to our understanding of carotenogenesis and its regulation during postharvest storage of fruits.
    Planta 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Stump overgrowth may serve as a unique model for studying cellular reorganization and mechanisms responsible for cell polarity changes during the process of vascular tissue differentiation from initially unorganized parenchymatous cells. Cellular ordering and tissue reorganization during the overgrowth process of the transverse surfaces of Douglas fir stumps in forest stand was studied. At the beginning of stump overgrowth, the produced parenchymatous cells form an unorganized tissue. Particular parenchyma cells start arranging into more ordered structures which resemble rays. Application of digital image analysis software based on structure tensor was used. The analysis showed that at this stage of tissue development, cellular elements display a wide range of angular orientation values and attain very low coherency coefficients. The progress of the tissue differentiation process is associated with the formation of local regions with tracheids oriented circularly around the rays. This coincides with an increase in the range of angular orientations and greater values of coherency coefficients. At the most advanced stage of tissue development, with tracheids arranged parallelly in longitudinal strands, the degree of cell ordering is the highest what is manifested by the greatest values attained by coherency coefficients, and the narrow range of angular orientations. It is suggested that the ray-like structures could act as organizing centers in the morphogenetic field responsible for differentiation of the overgrowth tissue. The circular pattern of tracheids around rays in the initial phase of tissue development can be interpreted in terms of local rotation of the morphogenetic field which afterward is transformed into irrotational field. This transformation is noted by the presence of tracheids arranged parallelly in longitudinal strands. The possible involvement of a mechanism controlling cell polarity with respect to auxin transport is discussed.
    Planta 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A green algal phenol oxidase was firstly purified, confirmed to be a laccase, and a hetero-oligomeric quaternary structure is suggested. The operation of a laccase-mediator system is firstly described in algae. Laccases (EC 1.10.3.2) catalyze the oxidation of a multitude of aromatic substrates. They are well known in higher plants and fungi, while their presence in green algae appears uncertain. Extracellular laccase-like enzyme activity has previously been described in culture supernatants of the green soil alga Tetracystis aeria [Otto et al. in Arch Microbiol 192:759-768, (2010)]. As reported herein, the T. aeria enzyme was purified 120-fold by employing a combination of anion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. The purified enzyme was confirmed to be a laccase according to its substrate specificity. It oxidizes 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), syringaldazine, and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (pH optima of pH ≤2.5, 7.0, and 6.5; K m values of 28.8, 40.5, and 1,830 µM; respectively), but not L-tyrosine or Fe(2+). ABTS is by far the most efficient substrate. Two polypeptides, A (~110 kDa) and B (71 kDa), were co-purified by the applied procedure, both being highly N-glycosylated (≥~53 and ≥27 %, respectively). As suggested by various gel electrophoretic analyses, the native enzyme (apparent molecular mass of ~220 kDa) most probably is a hetero-oligomer with the composition AB 2 , wherein A is the catalytic subunit and B forms a disulfide-linked homo-dimer B 2 . The decolorization of anthraquinone (Acid Blue 62 and Remazol Brilliant Blue R) and diazo dyes (Reactive Black 5) was studied in the presence of redox-mediating compounds (ABTS and syringaldehyde), demonstrating the operation of the laccase-mediator system in algae for the first time. Thus, laccases from green algae may participate in the biotransformation of a wide spectrum of natural and xenobiotic compounds.
    Planta 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Our studies showed that an apple B-box protein, MdCOL11, the homolog of AtBBX22, is involved in UV-B- and temperature-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in apple peel. Anthocyanin is responsible for the red pigmentation in apple peel and a R2R3 MYB gene, MdMYBA/1/10, a homolog of MdMYBA, controls its accumulation. Arabidopsis PAP1 is under the control of a series of upstream factors involved in light signal transduction and photomorphogenesis, such as ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5) and B-box family (BBX) proteins. In this study, we identified and characterized the homolog of Arabidopsis BBX22 in apple, designated as MdCOL11. Overexpression of MdCOL11 in Arabidopsis enhanced the accumulation of anthocyanin. In apples, MdCOL11 was differentially expressed in all tissues, with the highest expression in petals and the lowest expression in the xylem. Transcripts of MdCOL11 noticeably accumulated at the ripening stage, concomitant with increases in the expressions of anthocyanin biosynthesis-related genes. In an in vitro treatment experiment, MdCOL11 was upregulated in an ultra-violet (UV)-B- and temperature-dependent manner, together with the inductions of anthocyanin biosynthesis-related genes and anthocyanin accumulation in apple peel. Furthermore, a dual-luciferase assay indicated that (1) MdCOL11 regulated the expression of MdMYBA and (2) MdCOL11 was a target of MdHY5. Taken together, our results suggest that MdCOL11 is involved in MdHY5-mediated signal transduction and regulates anthocyanin accumulation in apple peel, which sheds new light on anthocyanin accumulation in apples.
    Planta 07/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: By integrating molecular, biochemical, and physiological data, ethylene biosynthesis in sugar beet was shown to be differentially regulated, affecting root elongation in a concentration-dependent manner. There is a close relation between ethylene production and seedling growth of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), yet the exact function of ethylene during this early developmental stage is still unclear. While ethylene is mostly considered to be a root growth inhibitor, we found that external 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) regulates root growth in sugar beet in a concentration-dependent manner: low concentrations stimulate root growth while high concentrations inhibit root growth. These results reveal that ethylene action during root elongation is strongly concentration dependent. Furthermore our detailed study of ethylene biosynthesis kinetics revealed a very strict gene regulation pattern of ACC synthase (ACS) and ACC oxidase (ACO), in which ACS is the rate liming step during sugar beet seedling development.
    Planta 07/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Salicylic acid (SA) is an important plant hormone, and its exogenous application can induce tolerance to multiple environmental stresses in plants. In this study, we examine the potential involvement of endogenous SA in response to chilling in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings. A low temperature of 8 °C induces a moderate increase in endogenous SA levels. Chilling stimulates the enzymatic activities and the expression of genes for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and benzoic acid-2-hydroxylase rather than isochorismate synthase. This indicates that the PAL enzymatic pathway contributes to chilling-induced SA production. Cucumber seedlings pretreated with SA biosynthesis inhibitors accumulate less endogenous SA and suffer more from chilling damage. The expression of cold-responsive genes is also repressed by SA inhibitors. The reduction in stress tolerance and in gene expression can be restored by the exogenous application of SA, confirming the critical roles of SA in chilling responses in cucumber seedlings. Furthermore, the inhibition of SA biosynthesis under chilling stress results in a prolonged and enhanced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation. The application of exogenous SA and the chemical scavenger of H2O2 reduces the excess H2O2 and alleviates chilling injury. In contrast, the protective effects of SA are negated by foliar spraying with high concentrations of H2O2 and an inhibitor of the antioxidant enzyme. These results suggest that endogenous SA is required in response to chilling stress in cucumber seedlings, by modulating the expression of cold-responsive genes and the precise induction of cellular H2O2 levels.
    Planta 07/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Co-expression of a lesquerella fatty acid elongase and the castor fatty acid hydroxylase in camelina results in higher hydroxy fatty acid containing seeds with normal oil content and viability. Producing hydroxy fatty acids (HFA) in oilseed crops has been a long-standing goal to replace castor oil as a renewable source for numerous industrial applications. A fatty acid hydroxylase, RcFAH, from Ricinus communis, was introduced into Camelina sativa, but yielded only 15 % of HFA in its seed oil, much lower than the 90 % found in castor bean. Furthermore, the transgenic seeds contained decreased oil content and the germination ability was severely affected. Interestingly, HFA accumulation was significantly increased in camelina seed when co-expressing RcFAH with a fatty acid condensing enzyme, LfKCS3, from Physaria fendleri, a native HFA accumulator relative to camelina. The oil content and seed germination of the transgenic seeds also appeared normal compared to non-transgenics. LfKCS3 has been previously characterized to specifically elongate the hydroxylated ricinoleic acid to lesquerolic acid, the 20-carbon HFA found in lesquerella oil. The elongation reaction may facilitate the HFA flux from phosphatidylcholine (PC), the site of HFA formation, into the acyl-CoA pool for more efficient utilization in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis. This was demonstrated by increased HFA accumulation in TAG concurrent with reduced HFA content in PC during camelina seed development, and increased C20-HFA in HFA-TAG molecules. These effects of LfKCS3 thus may effectively relieve the bottleneck for HFA utilization in TAG biosynthesis and the feedback inhibition to fatty acid synthesis, result in higher HFA accumulation and restore oil content and seed viability.
    Planta 07/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Changes in root and leaf hydraulic properties and stimulation of transpiration rates that were initially triggered by defoliation were accompanied by corresponding changes in leaf and root aquaporin expression. Aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings were subjected to defoliation treatments by removing 50, 75 % or all of the leaves. Root hydraulic conductivity (Lpr) was sharply reduced in plants defoliated for 1 day and 1 week. The decrease in L pr could not be prevented by stem girdling and it was accompanied in one-day-defoliated plants by a large decrease in the root expression of PIP1,2 aquaporin and an over twofold decrease in hydraulic conductivity of root cortical cells (L pc). Contrary to L pr and L pc, 50 and 75 % defoliation treatments profoundly increased leaf lamina conductance (K lam) after 1 day and this increase was similar in magnitude for both defoliation treatments. Transpiration rates (E) rapidly declined after the removal of 75 % of leaves. However, E increased by over twofold in defoliated plants after 1 day and the increases in E and K lam were accompanied by five- and tenfold increases in the leaf expression of PIP2;4 in 50 and 75 % defoliation treatments, respectively. Defoliation treatments also stimulated net photosynthesis after 1 day and 3 weeks, although the increase was not as high as E. Leaf water potentials remained relatively stable following defoliation with the exception of a small decrease 1 day after defoliation which suggests that root water transport did not initially keep pace with the increased transpirational water loss. The results demonstrate the importance of root and leaf hydraulic properties in plant responses to defoliation and point to the involvement of PIP aquaporins in the early events following the loss of leaves.
    Planta 06/2014;

Related Journals