International Journal of Colorectal Disease (Int J Colorectal Dis Clin Mol Gastroenterol Surg )

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Description

The International Journal of Colorectal Disease aims to publish novel and state-of-the-art papers which deal with the physiology and pathophysiology of diseases involving the entire gastrointestinal tract. In addition to original research articles of high scientific quality reviews will be included and controversial issues from rapidly developing areas in gastroenterology and gastrointestinal surgery addressed. The Journal offers its readers an interdisciplinary forum for clinical science and molecular research related to colorectal disease.

Impact factor 2.24

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness and cost of home electrical stimulation and standardized biofeedback training in females with fecal incontinence METHODS: Thirty-six females suffering from fecal incontinence were randomized into two groups, matched for mean age (67.45 ± 7.2 years), mean body mass index (kg/m(2)) (26.2 ± 3.9), mean disease duration (4.1 ± 0.8 years), mean number of births (2.7 ± 1.3), and reports of obstetric trauma (25 %). Questionnaires were used to evaluate their demographics, medical, and childbearing history. Subjects were randomized to home electrical stimulation or standardized biofeedback training for a period of 6 weeks. Subjective outcome measures included the frequency of fecal, urine, and gas incontinence by visual analog scale, Vaizey incontinence score, and subjects' levels of fecal incontinence related anxiety. Objective outcome measures included pelvic floor muscle strength assessed by surface electromyography. We also compared the cost of each treatment modality. Only females who received home electrical stimulation (HES) reported a significant improvement in Vaizey incontinence score (p = 0.001), anxiety (p = 0.046), and in frequency of leaked solid stool (p = 0.013). A significant improvement in pelvic floor muscle strength was achieved by both groups. HES was much cheaper compared to the cost of standardized biofeedback training (SBT) (US$100 vs. US$220, respectively). Our study comprised a small female population, and the study endpoints did not include objective measures of anorectal function test, such as anorectal manometry, before and after treatment. Home electrical stimulation may offer an alternative to standardized biofeedback training as it is effective and generally well-tolerated therapy for females with fecal incontinence.
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Transanal advancement flap is a recognized technique for complex fistula. Management of the tract is open to discussion. Excision of the tract by the "core out" technique is difficult and could increase the risk of sphincter damage. Curettage is easier but it could increase the risk of recurrence. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of both techniques on sphincter function and to study the clinical results. This is a retrospective analysis from a prospective database. One hundred nineteen consecutive patients with high cryptoglandular anal fistula were included. "Core out" technique was performed in 78 patients (group I) and "curettage" in 41 (group II). In both, a full-thickness rectal flap was advanced over the closed internal defect. Anorectal manometry was performed to assess sphincter function. Continence was assessed using the Wexner Scale. Recurrence was defined as the presence of an abscess or fistulization. Manometric results showed a significant decrease in the maximum resting pressure after surgery in both groups. The maximum squeeze pressure was significantly reduced only in group I (p < 0.001). No significant changes in Wexner score were observed. The overall recurrence rate was 5.88 %, five of group I (6.4 %) and two of group II (4.9 %), without statistical significance (p = 0.74). The core-out technique causes a significant decrease in squeeze pressures, which reflects damage to the external anal sphincter. This could lead to incontinence in high-risk patients. Curettage is a simple technique that preserves the values of squeeze pressures without increasing recurrence rates.
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To analyse the diagnostic value of simple clinical measurements in ensuring an early and accurate detection of advanced appendicitis (perforation, mass and peri-appendicular abscess) and possible complications. A retrospective, single-centre study of all paediatric (age 0-14 years) appendicectomies was conducted over a 14-year period. Preoperative symptoms, signs and laboratory results, intra-operative findings and postoperative complications were analyzed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to estimate sensitivity and specificity of significant (p ≤ 0.05) predictor variables based on multivariate logistic regression models. One thousand and thirty-seven patients were included. Perforations were seen in 88 (8.5 %) cases, and abscesses were seen in 35 (3.4 %) cases. Of all the clinical variables evaluated, preoperative temperature ≥37.5 °C was most discriminatory for advanced appendicitis. Significant other discriminatory clinical variables were WBC count ≥15,100/μL, preoperative anorexia and rebound tenderness. Postoperative complications occurred in 74 (7.1 %) patients and were associated with pre-operative temperature ≥37.5 °C and advanced appendicitis. Independent clinical predictors of advanced appendicitis exist but lack individual accuracy. In this study, preoperative pyrexia is shown to be highly associated with both advanced appendicitis and development of postoperative complications. This independent factor may point to early need for antibiotic treatment, urgent imaging and subsequent intervention in patients with appendicitis.
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Crohn's disease (CD) is one type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that has been speculated to share prognostic factors with the development of stroke. There is controversial information in the literature regarding the association between CD and stroke. The present cohort study estimated the risk of subsequent stroke among CD patients compared with matched comparison subjects drawn from a population-based dataset in Taiwan. This study drew data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database to conduct a historical cohort study. The study cohort comprised 3309 CD patients, and the comparison cohort comprised 13,236 subjects without an IBD. Cox proportional hazards regressions were performed to estimate the risk of subsequent stroke during the follow-up period. We also conducted additional analyses stratifying by age group and gender. After adjusting for selected medical co-morbidities and recent prescriptions of selected pharmaceuticals, the hazard ratio (HR) for subsequent stroke among patients with CD was found to be 1.911 (95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.65-2.22) that of comparison subjects. While we did not detect an association between stroke and CD among patients aged 30-40 years, we did detect increased risks for stroke among CD patients aged 40-50 years (HR = 2.29) and those aged over 50 years (HR = 1.88). We also found women (HR = 2.39) to be at a greater risk than men (HR = 1.50). This study reports an increased HR for subsequent stroke among CD patients when compared to matched comparison patients without IBD in an Asian population.
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Defunctioning loop ileostomy in low anterior resection (LAR) is routinely used to reduce consequences of anastomotic leakage. The purpose of this study was to analyze which examination technique is optimal for evaluating the integrity of the anastomosis prior to loop ileostomy reversal. Retrospective analysis of 95 patients who had been subjected to LAR at Helsingborg Hospital and Skåne University Hospital, Sweden, was undertaken between January 2007 and June 2009. The examination techniques of the rectal anastomosis prior to reversal and the clinical outcome after reversal were studied. Radiologic anastomosis control using water soluble contrast enema, digital rectal examination (DRE), and rectoscopy were performed in 53 % (50/95), 98 % (93/95), and 69 % (66/95), respectively. In two patients, no control of the anastomosis was performed before reversal. Fifty-two percent (49/95) of the patients were examined using all techniques. Six patients demonstrated leakage detected before reversal of which two were only radiological leakages. These two patients underwent loop ileostomy reversal after delay without complications. They were the only ones where the three examination techniques did not prove coherence. Four patients had symptomatic leakage; these were detected with rectoscopy and DRE and verified with enema. Three patients developed anastomotic leakage after loop ileostomy reversal despite normal preoperative examinations. Two of these patients had rectovaginal fistulas (AVFs). This retrospective study indicates that contrast enema does not provide additional information if rectoscopy and DRE are normal. Despite negative examinations, three of nine leakages were diagnosed after loop ileostomy reversal. Especially, AVFs seem difficult to diagnose.
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: It has been reported that some patients do not have an anastomosis of a marginal artery near the rectosigmoid junction, but the frequency of this condition and its clinical significance so far remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the blood flow at the marginal artery near the rectosigmoid junction. From January 2013 to January 2014, we enrolled consecutive patients with a preoperative diagnosis of left-sided colon cancer or rectal cancer who underwent surgery with lymph node dissection. During the operation, the blood flow through the point of origin of the last sigmoid arterial branch, originating from the inferior mesenteric artery, was interrupted, and the rectosigmoid junction was supplied by only the marginal artery. We injected indocyanine green intravenously and observed the blood flow using a near-infrared camera system. A total of 119 consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. Sixty-eight patients (57.1 %) had a good anastomosis of the marginal artery near the rectosigmoid junction (type A). In 27 patients (22.7 %), a fluorescence border was recognized, but the fluorescence border diminished within 60 s (Type B). In 18 patients (15.1 %), delayed fluorescence was recognized over 60 s (type C), and 6 patients (5.0 %) had no fluorescence at all (type D). A mean length of 14.8 cm was found from the peritoneal reflection to fluorescence border of blood flow. This study proves that cases without the anastomosis of the marginal artery of the rectosigmoid junction truly exist, using studies in living humans (UMIN000011186).
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Basic fibroblastic growth factor (bFGF), a member of the heparin-binding growth factor family, regulates muscle differentiation. We investigated whether coadministration of autologous myoblasts and bFGF-loaded polycaprolactone beads could improve sphincter recovery in a dog model of fecal incontinence (FI). FI was induced by resecting 25 % of the posterior anal sphincter in ten mongrel dogs. One month later, the dogs were randomized to receive either PKH-26-labeled autologous myoblasts alone (M group, five dogs) or autologous myoblasts and bFGF-loaded polycaprolactone beads (MBG group, five dogs). The outcomes included anal manometry, compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) of the pudendal nerve, and histology. The increase in anal contractile pressure over 3 months was significantly greater in the MBG group (from 4.85 to 6.83 mmHg) than that in the M group (from 4.94 to 4.25 mmHg), with a coefficient for the difference in recovery rate of 2.672 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.962 to 4.373, p = 0.002). The change in the CMAP amplitude was also significantly greater in the MBG group (from 0.59 to 1.56 mV) than that in the M group (from 0.81 to 0.67 mV) (coefficient 1.114, 95 % CI 0.43 to 1.80, p = 0.001). Labeled cells were detected in 2/5 (40 %) and 5/5 (100 %) dogs in the M and MBG groups, respectively. Coadministration of bFGF-loaded PCL beads and autologous myoblasts improved the recovery of sphincter function in a dog model of FI and had better outcomes than cell-based therapy alone.
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The novel function of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is cardiovascular homeostasis. While the major active mediator angiotensin II (ANG II) produces most of the physiologic responses via angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R), recent insights have looked at the implications of ANG II and its impact on solid tumor formation. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the direct effect of ANG II on the stimulation of angiogenesis via VEGF and other proliferative mediators. RAS components have thus been identified in numerous malignant tissues. Inhibition of the AT1R via angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is) has demonstrated a decrease in solid tumor development and metastasis. Numerous retrospective analyses have demonstrated a reduction in colorectal cancer incidence, polyp formation, and distant metastasis in patients taking inhibitors of the RAS. The use of commonly prescribed anti-hypertensive medications as a chemo-preventative medication may have a remarkable impact in the colorectal cancer community. Further investigation and prospective clinical trials may provide further insight into the potentially beneficial use of ACE-Is and their impact on colorectal cancer.
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Small rectal carcinoid tumors (<10 mm) are often removed via endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). However, the use of ESD for tumors of an intermediate size (7-16 mm) is less well documented. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ESD compared with endoscopic mucosal resection using a cap (EMR-C) for the treatment of 7-16-mm rectal carcinoids. From September 2007 to August 2012, 55 patients with large rectal carcinoid tumors were treated by EMR-C (30 cases) or ESD (25 cases). The en bloc resection rate, pathological complete response (pCR) rate, procedure time, and incidence rates of complications, local recurrence, and distant metastasis were evaluated. The basic and clinical characteristics of the patients in the two groups did not differ significantly (p > 0.05). The mean procedure time was longer for ESD than EMR-C (24.79 ± 4.89 vs. 9.52 ± 2.14 min, p < 0.001). The rates of en bloc resection and pCR were higher with ESD than with EMR-C (100 vs. 83.33 %, and 100 vs. 70.00 %, respectively). No patients in the EMR-C group experienced complications. However, in the ESD group, two cases of perforation occurred, and one patient experienced delayed bleeding. These complications were successfully managed via endoscopical therapy. Five cases of local recurrence were detected after EMR-C, whereas no patients experienced recurrence after ESD. Compared with EMR-C, ESD appears to be a more favorable therapeutic option for the treatment of rectal carcinoid tumors less than 16 mm in diameter based on improved rates of pCR and local recurrence.
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: During restaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT), the assessment of lymph node (LN) metastasis is vital for selecting further treatment strategies. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of LN size to predict LN metastasis in rectal cancer patients after preoperative CRT. A total of 30 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by curative resection of primary rectal cancer were selected as a study group (CRT group). As a control group (non-CRT group), 30 patients who underwent primary tumor resection were selected using a 1:1 case-match design. Matching criteria were gender, age, and clinical T stage. The size of each LN was measured from the surgical specimen. To clarify optimal cutoff values for node size according to the risk of detecting metastasis, receiving-operator characteristic (ROC) curves were generated. In the non-CRT group, 39/474 LNs were confirmed to have metastasis. In the CRT group, 29/422 LNs showed metastasis. The median size of metastatic LNs was 6.0 mm in CRT group, which was significantly larger than 4.0 mm in the non-CRT group (p = 0.006). The optimal cutoff value for determining metastasis in the CRT group was 4.5 mm, compared to 3.5 mm in the non-CRT group. The accuracy of the cutoff value was much higher in the CRT group (CRT vs. non-CRT, 77.9 vs. 59.9 %). LN size is a strong indicator for prediction of regional LN metastasis in rectal cancer patients after preoperative CRT, compared to those without CRT.
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Redo-surgery with new colorectal (CRA) or coloanal (CAA) anastomosis for failed previous CRA or CAA is exposed to failure and recurrent leakage, especially in case of rectovaginal fistula (RVF) or chronic pelvic sepsis (CPS). In these two situations, transanal colonic pull-through and delayed coloanal anastomosis (DCAA) could be an alternative to avoid definitive stoma. This study aimed to assess results of such redo-surgery with DCAA for failed CRA or CAA with CPS and/or RVF. All patients who underwent DCAA for failed CRA or CAA with CPS and/or RVF were reviewed. Success was defined as a patient without any stoma at the end of follow-up. Long-term functional results were assessed using the low anterior resection syndrome (LARS) score. 24 DCAA were performed after failed CRA or CAA with CPS (n = 15) or RVF (n = 9). Sixteen (67 %) patients had a diverting stoma at the time (n = 5) or performed during DCAA (n = 11). After a mean follow-up of 29 ± 19 months, success rate was 79 % (19/24): 5 patients had a permanent stoma because of recurrent sepsis (n = 2), anastomotic stricture (n = 1), or poor functional outcomes (n = 2). Functional outcomes were satisfactory (no or minor LARS) in 82 % of the successful patients. In case of failed CRA or CAA with CPS or RVF, DCAA was associated with a 79 % success rate. It could therefore be proposed as an alternative to standard redo-CRA or CAA when the risk of recurrent sepsis and failure with subsequent definitive stoma is thought to be high.
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;
  • International Journal of Colorectal Disease 01/2015;