Journal of Happiness Studies

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Description

The Journal of Happiness Studies is a peer reviewed scientific journal devoted to subjective well-being. It covers both cognitive evaluations of life (like life-satisfaction) and affective enjoyment of life (such as mood level). Next to contributions on appraisal of life-as-a-whole the journal accepts contributions on life domains (such as job-satisfaction) and life-aspects (such as perceived meaning of life). The Journal of Happiness Studies provides a forum for two main traditions in happiness research: 1) speculative reflection on the good life and 2) empirical investigation of subjective well-being. Contributions from all sciences are welcomed: alpha-sciences (in particular philosophy) beta-sciences (especially health related quality-of-life research) and gamma-sciences (not only psychology and sociology but also economy). Leading questions concern the conceptualization measurement prevalence explanation evaluation imagination and study of happiness. Leading Questions: Conceptualisation : What meanings are denoted by terms like happiness and subjective well being How do these fit in with broader conceptions of the good life Measurement : In what ways can we assess how people feel about life What are the best measures for what purposes Can scores be compared between individuals and across time and culture Prevalence : How do people feel about life Are there systematic differences across social categories culture and time Explanation : What goes on in people when they appraise their life Which mental and neural processes are involved What conditions foster a positive appreciation of life How are these effects mediated Why do we feel good or bad What is the use of going through life-appraisals Evaluation : What are the consequences of enjoyng life or not Is happiness a worthwhile goal for therapy and social policy Imagination : How is happiness portrayed in arts and fiction What does the public think of it Do beliefs fit reality How do policy makers think of happiness Do their beliefs matter Does imagination affect appraisals of life Study : How has the study of happiness developed Can we link philosophical thought and empirical research

  • Impact factor
    1.88
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    5.50
  • Immediacy index
    0.29
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Journal of Happiness Studies website
  • Other titles
    Journal of happiness studies (Online)
  • ISSN
    1389-4978
  • OCLC
    44554714
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors own final version only can be archived
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's website or institutional repository
    • On funders designated website/repository after 12 months at the funders request or as a result of legal obligation
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study investigates two distinct but interrelated phenomena—that of experienced leisure and that of perceived leisure—in order to determine empirically whether and how the perception and use of free time affects an individual’s level of satisfaction. The analysis was conducted on a sample of approximately 50,000 individuals, representative of the Italian population. It focused on the person-centred sphere of leisure: both the objective aspect—that is, participation in leisure activities—and the subjective aspects—that is, the different meanings of leisure and levels of satisfaction or dissatisfaction expressed by the subjects—were investigated. By applying multivariate analytical techniques (Multiple Correspondence Analysis and Cluster Analysis), synthetic indices were calculated and subject typologies were developed. Logistic regression models were also used to investigate the relationship between perception, activity and satisfaction. The results confirmed that the objective and subjective aspects are interrelated: there are specific activities related to the type of perception of leisure activities which contribute significantly to making a person happy. There are other aspects, however, such as relational activities and sports, which are important for the satisfaction of those whose conception of leisure seems discordant with respect to such activities.
    Journal of Happiness Studies 04/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper examines cross-country happiness interdependencies. The sample under study includes 116 countries of diverse characteristics using averaged data for the year 2006. We divide the entire data into six groups of countries, viz., Income domain (developed and developing); Income inequality (equal and unequal); Level of political history (socialist and non-socialist). A spatial econometric technique is used to estimate the spillover effects of one country’s well-being on the well-being of the neighboring countries. Both spatial and non-spatial results indicate that corruption, health and national income serve as the best indicators of happiness for developed and equal countries, whereas unemployment affects the developing, non-socialist and unequal nations. Corruption appears to be the most significant factor, implying that a better quality government makes everybody happy. Furthermore, we find significant happiness spillovers among the above specified groups, thus indicating the importance of group clustering in the studies of happiness. The result suggests that the more homogenous the group is, the higher will be the spillover among them. We observe positive spillover for developed countries and negative spillover for socialist and equal countries. Ignoring such spatial spillover effect may lead to misunderstanding of various policy implications.
    Journal of Happiness Studies 01/2014;

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