European Journal of Social Work (Eur J Soc Work )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

The European Journal of Social Work is a new forum for academic debate in the social professions. It publishes refereed papers on key contemporary issues in social policy social service institutions and strategies of social change. The focus is primarily European but major international contributions are also published. The Journal aims to reflect the diversity of cultural and conceptual traditions in which the social professions in Europe are grounded. At the same time it seeks to examine emerging European paradigms in methodology and comparative analysis.

Impact factor 0.58

  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    5.30
  • Immediacy index
    0.03
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    European Journal of Social Work website
  • Other titles
    European journal of social work (Online)
  • ISSN
    1369-1457
  • OCLC
    48450540
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • European Journal of Social Work 01/2015; 18(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Through a historical review of child welfare laws and policies between 1896 and 1992 in Norway, this article investigates the state control of families. The central questions in this article relate to the transformations in the forms of state control of families. The research on which this article is based has relied on a genealogical approach. The sources are comprised of previous studies focusing on the historical development of child welfare in Norway. This article argues that state control, from having been explicit in the late nineteenth century, has today become increasingly implicit and hidden. Indeed, the value granted to children's rights and equality has made opposition to state interventions in families difficult. I relate the transformations in state control of families to the affirmation of the norms of ‘egalitarian individualism’. As Norway is amongst the first European countries to make child-centrism a hallmark of its social policies, these findings have implications for EU countries that may follow its path.
    European Journal of Social Work 10/2014; 17(5).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper provides a critical commentary on researching social work in transition to make the case for why history is important at crucial moments of change. The present transition of child protection and welfare practice from a Health Services Executive Structure to an Independent Child and Family Agency (Tusla) is focused on for illustration. This development signifies a major transition of services within the country influenced by a number of factors, most notably a number of high profile cases of child abuse within institutions in the past and child deaths/neglect cases in the present. In particular, a discourse of prevention, early intervention and the promotion of children's rights are most dominant in light of a quest to purge the mistakes of the past. Supported by a history of the present approach, the author argues that while the existence of a ‘discursive shift’ typified by the establishment of an independent agency is arguably conclusive, the evidence of changes in practice, culture and underpinning analytical approaches is much more vague and complex. The paper concludes with reflections on implications for a wider European and global context and a call for the need for more critically informed approaches to history to inform present transformations.
    European Journal of Social Work 10/2014; 17(5).
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    ABSTRACT: This article addresses the process of translation, necessary in the present social work academic and practice communities, as a form of transformation of knowledge. It is argued that knowledge is transformed in the translation process on the terms set by the language into which it is translated. As the English language is the lingua franca of the present academic and other international communities, it is the English language that sets the criteria for translation. In social work, which is conventionally seen as context-bound, the translation process includes some loss of the original particularities. The Finnish child welfare system is used as an example. It is demonstrated how complicated, if not even absurd, the translations may be. The English terms, related to a different child welfare ideology and history, do not meet the essence of the Finnish welfare-focused child welfare system. Instead of fluent translation, robust translations are suggested as the way forward. The robust, foreign-sounding translations would recognise the context-bound particularities. Yet, the challenge is how to find a communicative balance between fluent and robust translation.
    European Journal of Social Work 10/2014; 17(5).
  • European Journal of Social Work 10/2014; 17(5).
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    ABSTRACT: I trace an account of social work—and sociology—that I believe holds a promise for re-forming the relationship between the two. I develop the argument in two ways. First, taking 1920s Chicago as a case study, I will attempt ‘a history of the present’ to suggest how the relationship between sociology and social work came to be as it is. I will suggest that the practice of some (both familiar and forgotten) people in 1920s and 1930s sociology and social work is best explained as a form of ‘sociological social work’. Second, after tracking this genealogy, I suggest an agenda for sociological social work that consists of straining to enact certain kinds of inter-disciplinary relationships, developing methodological social work practice, hearing occasional sociological frontier conversations and shared theorising. I illustrate how these arguments challenge both sociology and social work and both theory and practice.
    European Journal of Social Work 10/2014; 17(5).
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    ABSTRACT: The supportive community is a program that was developed in Israel for older people who live at home. The program provides its members with a service package that includes medical and social services, emergency call-button, cultural activities, and a ‘community parent’ who is responsible for the members. Using quantitative method, this study compared the level of quality of life between 55 older people living in their homes who are members of a supportive community (average age = 74.7) and 60 elderly people living in nursing homes (average age = 75.8). As expected, results indicate that quality of life among the older people living at their homes who are members of a supportive community was higher than among the older people living in a nursing home. In addition, the quality of life of married, educated, functionally independent older people in good health and with a good economic situation was higher. Predictor variables of quality of life were: the place of residence, health status, and age. In light of increased life expectancy and the growing need to care for the older population, the practical application of the study focused on a recommendation for the social services to continue the support community development program.
    European Journal of Social Work 10/2014; 17(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Literature highlighting both the archaeology (chronology) of child welfare developments or genealogy (insight into the discourses shaping such developments) is rare. Even less available are investigations into the research agenda regarding child welfare. This paper attempts to provide a snapshot of the priorities for child welfare researchers as represented in the international literature from 2005 to 2010 and the discourses inherent within these. The qualitative study suggests that issues regarding the identification and responses to child abuse dominate, these concerns being framed individualistically and tending to ignore sociopolitical realities. Such a construction of the research agenda potentially marginalizes systemic factors and limits the relevance of the research agenda in contexts where poverty, community violence (including war) and migration (forced and voluntary) are in the foreground. The lived realities facing the majority of the world's children are thus overlooked. The research agenda must be expanded to address the context of the most vulnerable children and to promote child welfare alternatives that speak to their experiences.
    European Journal of Social Work 09/2014;
  • European Journal of Social Work 08/2014; 17(4).
  • European Journal of Social Work 08/2014; 17(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Few studies estimate the longer-term effects of family group conferences (FGCs), as previous research has been mainly qualitative or has focused only on the shorter-term effects of FGCs. This study analyses, using a randomised controlled design, the longer-term effects of adult FGCs in terms of social support, mental health and re-employment. A total of 149 Norwegian longer-term social assistance recipients were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. Participants were followed up 12 months after baseline. To gain in-depth knowledge of the FGC process, 15 participants were interviewed. Despite high shares of participant satisfaction and significant shorter-term effects, the one-year follow-up identified neutral effects of the intervention. Qualitative interviews demonstrated that lack of reciprocity in social relationships and lack of follow-up were the main reasons for the stagnation of an initially positive FGC process.
    European Journal of Social Work 08/2014; 17(4).
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    ABSTRACT: The social work profession worldwide has been increasingly influenced by globalization and its effects on social issues that require social workers to be responsive and knowledgeable in addressing them. In recent years there has been an increased emphasis on the internationalization of the social work profession and education. With limited examples of international social-work-teaching methods discussed in the literature, there is also a lack of information obtained directly from students on methods of instruction that they most prefer and find beneficial. This collaborative, comparative project examined students' perceptions of methods that make teaching international social work successful at three universities in the United States, United Kingdom, and Georgia. While there were different preferences for content- and process-driven approaches in teaching, students' common interest was in gaining practice examples and exposure to real-life practice of international social work in their own and other countries. The findings suggest that international social work education needs to be more experiential and practice-based.
    European Journal of Social Work 08/2014; 17(4).
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    ABSTRACT: The aims were to describe Swedish social work students' personality characteristics upon entry to their training and to analyze relationships between personality traits, mental health, and some sociodemographic variables. One hundred and twenty-one female social work students completed a sociodemographic form, the Temperament and Character Inventory, and the Symptom Checklist. They scored significantly higher on harm avoidance, reward dependence, and self-transcendence and reported more somatization, obsessive compulsive, and phobic-anxious symptoms, and less hostility, than Swedish individuals from the general population of the same age. Personality traits significantly predicted the various mental symptom scores. It is recommended to implement modules or training courses within social work training in Sweden that bring an improvement of self-directedness and cooperativeness character trait into focus.
    European Journal of Social Work 08/2014; 17(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Small-group self-administered interviews were conducted with 80 students entering a social work degree in the UK, asking about their motivations, political engagement and perspectives on equality. Especially as the interviews went on, many students were found to identify structural constraints on agency and express a desire to learn more about the political stakes of social work. However, it was concluded that speakers had to contend with, and by degrees operate upon, a neoliberal discursive terrain.
    European Journal of Social Work 08/2014; 17(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Online mutual help experiences may represent an opportunity for people with long-term chronic (LTC) conditions and their caregivers. However, there are very few accounts of or research on online practices of mutual support about such issues. On the other hand, the growth of online experiences of mutual aid has been extensive in recent decades. These experiences have been conventionally classified under the notion of ‘online support groups’. However, the notion of group seems to be reductive for the variety of forms, meanings and implications of such experiences. On the basis of these assumptions, our paper aims at: a) describing the main differences between traditional forms of mutual help and online mutual help; b) identifying the emerging forms of online mutual help experience, emphasizing their distinctive features; c) tracing the potential connections between different experiences and people, practitioners and institutions. We identify three main types of online mutual help experience: groups, communities and extemporary practices. We then analyze the value they can have for LTC people, caregivers, practitioners and institutions, emphasizing their heterogeneity. Finally we discuss the overall evolution of the mutual help phenomenon, considering its transition to an online dimension.
    European Journal of Social Work 08/2014; 17(4).
  • European Journal of Social Work 08/2014; 17(4).
  • European Journal of Social Work 08/2014; 17(4).
  • European Journal of Social Work 08/2014; 17(4).
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to analyse the assessments of elderly people aged 65 and more about family caregiving as a factor influencing their quality of life and coping. The study is based on the project SUFACARE—‘Supporting family carers and care receivers in Estonia and in Finland’—in the framework of which the Institute of Social Work of Tallinn University carried out postal surveys in 2010. The Estonian survey was conducted in Tallinn and Lääne-Viru County. The total number of respondents was 581 (70% female and 30% male), of whom 98 (n=74 female and n=24 male) were family caregivers. Caregiving has not influenced the physical and mental health of caregivers, the reason being that many people who receive care are not of very ill health or suffer from dementia. People mostly take care of their spouses. Based on the Estonian Family Law Act (RT I 2009, 60, 395), adult descendants are required to provide maintenance if their relatives are not able to care for themselves. Caregivers whose health is below average consider caring to be physically demanding. We cannot speak of the social isolation of respondents who have care duties—they communicate actively and do not feel lonely. Women report caregiving to be physically strenuous more often than men. The mental health of male caregivers is better—fewer male respondents claimed to feel unhappy or depressed compared to female respondents.
    European Journal of Social Work 08/2014; 17(4).