Journal of Money Laundering Control Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Emerald

Journal description

Guided by its expert editors and eminent International Advisory Board, Journal of Money Laundering Control is the world's only quarterly, peer-reviewed journal designed to keep subscribers up to date with the latest law, regulation, techniques and best practice in the prevention, identification and prosecution of money laundering.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Journal of Money Laundering Control website
ISSN 1368-5201

Publisher details

Emerald

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Voluntary deposit by author of author's pre-print or author's post-print allowed on author's personal website or Institutional repository, where there is no mandate to deposit
    • If mandated by a funding agency, the author's post-print may be deposited in any open access repository after a 24 months embargo period
    • Author's pre-print and Author's post-print not allowed on subject-based repository
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set statement
    • Non-commercial
    • Publisher last contacted on 02/04/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Journal of Money Laundering Control 05/2015; 18(2):220-233. DOI:10.1108/JMLC-10-2014-0036
  • Journal of Money Laundering Control 05/2015; 18(2):169-181. DOI:10.1108/JMLC-10-2014-0040
  • Journal of Money Laundering Control 05/2015; 18(2):137-152. DOI:10.1108/JMLC-10-2014-0037
  • Journal of Money Laundering Control 05/2015; 18(2):153-168. DOI:10.1108/JMLC-10-2014-0035
  • Journal of Money Laundering Control 05/2015; 18(2):234-247. DOI:10.1108/JMLC-11-2014-0045
  • Journal of Money Laundering Control 05/2015; 18(2). DOI:10.1108/JMLC-11-2014-0042
  • Journal of Money Laundering Control 01/2015; 18(1):66-80. DOI:10.1108/JMLC-07-2014-0022
  • Journal of Money Laundering Control 01/2015; 18(1):112-130. DOI:10.1108/JMLC-12-2013-0049
  • Journal of Money Laundering Control 01/2015; 18(1):81-98. DOI:10.1108/JMLC-10-2013-0040
  • Journal of Money Laundering Control 01/2015; 18(1):17-33. DOI:10.1108/JMLC-10-2013-0039
  • Journal of Money Laundering Control 01/2015; 18(1):2-16. DOI:10.1108/JMLC-11-2013-0046
  • Journal of Money Laundering Control 01/2015; 18(1):52-65. DOI:10.1108/JMLC-01-2014-0001
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to examine the current state and future pressures of money laundering on Jamaica and the financial crime connections between the UK and Jamaica. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The paper focuses on the primary data collected from a series of semi-structured interviews with members from the law enforcement and financial services sectors of Jamaica. The main objective of the interviews was to secure a range of opinions concerning the problem of money laundering in the country. Interviewees were selected from the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, the Financial Investigation Division of the Ministry of Finance and Planning, the British High Commission and the Financial Services Commission. The names of all subjects shall remain anonymous to protect the privacy of those who were interviewed. Findings ‐ Through the analysis of primary data it will be shown that Jamaica remains vulnerable to money laundering ‐ particularly the proceeds of crime laundered through the remittance sector ‐ despite a legislative overhaul in 2007 to adopt the UK's Proceeds of Crime Act. Ineffective legislation is most certainly due to generic weaknesses and flaws which are applicable to many Caribbean states, for example, a lack of political will to enforce anti-money laundering regulations, corruption, inadequate police training, lack of resources, a strong remittance sector and geographical positioning along a drug-trafficking route. Originality/value ‐ This paper is the first of its kind to comprehensively analyze the money laundering situation in Jamaica, using detailed first accounts from members of the law enforcement and financial sectors.
    Journal of Money Laundering Control 07/2014; 17(3). DOI:10.1108/JMLC-09-2013-0032
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ This paper aims to verify the perceptions of Cypriot society in relation to corruption. In an attempt to do so, 1,521 Cypriots participated between the months of September 2011 and October 2011 in the survey on the level of corruption in Cyprus. The survey was conducted by the organization "Transparency Cyprus". Participants were 52 per cent female and 48 per cent male, age groups covered by 18 years until retirement, of whom 51 per cent work in the private sector, 16 per cent in the public sector, 24 per cent do not work, while 9 per cent work in semi-governmental organizations. Finally, 34 per cent are high school graduates, 37 per cent had higher education and 29 per cent hold a postgraduate university degree. The survey results show that corruption in Cyprus is considered by the vast majority of participants (86 per cent) as a serious problem and will also increase due to the economic crisis (79 per cent). The majority (93 per cent) of respondents believes that corruption and/or abuse of power for personal benefit exists and is widespread in most national politicians, in government officials in awarding public tenders (92 per cent) and in the police (90 per cent). Design/methodology/approach ‐ In an attempt to verify the perceptions of Cypriot society in relation to corruption, 1,521 Cypriots participated between the months of September 2011 and October 2011 in the survey on the level of corruption in Cyprus. To analyze the results of the survey, the statistical package SPSS has been utilized. Findings ‐ Seventy per cent consider corruption a major issue in Cyprus, while 60 per cent are being or have been affected by corruption directly. Almost all interviewees (92 per cent) believe that the police are also corrupted. Sixty-one per cent believe that not enough is being done to fight corruption, and in the cases that something was done, it was not enough. Seventy-five per cent blame the government, 67 per cent blame the police and 58 per cent blame the prosecutors and judges. Research limitations/implications ‐ On the completion of the upcoming survey (for the year 2013), one can compare these results and identify the associations between the two surveys. Another limitation of this survey is that people could have answered based on their perceptions; therefore, the results should be treated with extra care. Originality/value ‐ This research manuscript takes a step further to deepen our understanding of corruption in Cyprus. The findings of the survey performed could serve as policy prescription for the policy-makers who aim to strengthen the institutional environment in Cyprus. To do so, one should examine the current stage of the environment in Cyprus, something that this research paper explores through the survey conducted.
    Journal of Money Laundering Control 07/2014; 17(3). DOI:10.1108/JMLC-01-2014-0006
  • Journal of Money Laundering Control 07/2014; 17(3). DOI:10.1108/JMLC-05-2014-0014
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of the paper is to trace the historical foundations of forfeiture from antiquity to its migration into early criminal law statutes. From there the discussion turns to gaps in the law that gained recognition with the emergence of globalized economies and the development of technologies that allowed illicit wealth to be moved transnationally with ease and stealth. The balance of the paper will give an overview of the countermeasures taken in response to these gaps. The paper concludes with comment on the recent spread of non-conviction-based asset forfeiture laws and the practical use to which these laws can be put in relation to the tracing, seizing and forfeiture of illicitly acquired wealth. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The paper opted for a historical legal review of the development of forfeiture laws in common law jurisdictions. Findings ‐ The paper traces the development of the origins of forfeiture in the common law. It lays out the original compensatory objectives of forfeiture and its eventual migration into the criminal law. The paper describes how non-conviction-based asset forfeiture has evolved in modern times as a response to gaps in the criminal law that have been exposed by the pernicious aspects of globalized economies and the ease with which electronic intangible assets can be moved and beneficial ownership obscured. Originality/value ‐ This paper provides an overview of the origins of forfeiture law and traces the use and adaptation of that law as an emerging and effective response to transnational money laundering.
    Journal of Money Laundering Control 07/2014; 17(3). DOI:10.1108/JMLC-01-2014-0005