Human Resource Development International (Hum Resource Dev Int )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

Human Resource Development International will promote all aspects of practice and research that explore issues of individual, group and organisational learning and performance. In adopting this perspective HRDI is committing itself to questioning the divide between practice and theory; between the 'practitioner' and the 'academic'; between traditional and experimental methodological approaches and between organisational demands of scholarship. HRDI is committed to a wide understanding of 'organisation' - one that extends through self-managed teams, voluntary work, or family businesses to global enterprises and bureaucracies. HRDI also commits itself to exporing the development of organisations and the life-long learning of people and their collectivity (organisation), their strategy and their policy, from all parts of the world. In this way HRDI will become a leading forum for debate and exploration of the interdisciplinary field of human resource development.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Human Resource Development International website
  • ISSN
    1367-8868
  • OCLC
    39227307
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Human Resource Development International 12/2014; 17(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper explores the possibilities and potential surrounding inclusive talent management in contrast to conventional normative treatments. By closely examining the meaning of ‘inclusive’ in relation to talent, the paper moves towards a definition of inclusive talent management which is contextualised in a four-part typology of talent management strategies which offers greater conceptual clarity to researchers working in this field. Our conceptualisation of inclusive talent management is further located in the traditions of positive psychology and the Capability Approach. The practical implications of introducing inclusive talent management strategies are considered.
    Human Resource Development International 09/2014;
  • Human Resource Development International 08/2014; 17(4).
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    ABSTRACT: The paper explores the construct of employee engagement (EE) from a critical and discourse perspective. It is argued that the win-win discourse which characterizes much discussion on EE within a traditional management paradigm presents a decontextualized, depoliticized vision of the organization. The paper examines mainstream critiques of the construct of EE and the contribution of HRD, and notes that HRD processes and practices are seen as important contributors to engagement. It introduces a critical perspective on EE and HRD, viewing EE as a social construction. It highlights problematic assumption in mainstream literatures, such as of the accordance of employee and organization interests. The paper examines how the discourse ‘talks employee engagement into being’, how cultural management programmes serve to construct the ‘engaged employee’ and the impact of competing discourses. A discussion on disengagement reflects on the mismatch between Fordist work practices and EE. The paper concludes by arguing that viewing EE through a critical lens can potentially help towards an HRD practice that is focused on employee interests rather than largely on organizational interests.
    Human Resource Development International 08/2014; 17(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the wake of the post-2008 global financial crisis, there has been a failure by those in the HRD profession to critically challenge key assumptions relating to their own practice. The result is a continuation of its status as a ‘weakened’ profession. This article explores a failure by professionals and academe to address this position. An argument is made for Critical HRD Education (CHRDE), aiming at the United Kingdom’s professional education scheme. We seek to show how everyday issues that occur in HRD practice can be linked to a socio-economic context through the use of C. Wright Mills’ view of The Sociological Imagination. Examples of use are provided before implications for practitioners, and theorizing is considered.
    Human Resource Development International 08/2014; 17(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Some scholars have concluded that critical reflection may be too difficult to operate in a workplace context. Yet this is in tension with the rise of normative theories calling for its operation in practice, and linking this with critical HRD’s hope for a more reflexive practitioner world. This looks like an impasse, as critical reflection is rejected where it is supposedly needed most. The purpose of this article is to present a theoretical framework that can point beyond this problem. The framework is inspired by Hannah Arendt’s concept of the public space of appearance. Leaning on this idea, critical reflection is provided with important spatial inflections that can supply current theory with the political reflexivity it seems to lack. Critical reflection is theorized as a challenging, but intrinsically reflexive space of honesty, critique and new beginnings. Implications for future thinking about critical reflection in critical HRD are discussed. Conclusions are also drawn for how this framework may help advance this field’s praxical project.
    Human Resource Development International 08/2014; 17(4).
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    ABSTRACT: This account focuses on reporting the use of a fictional story to engage participants in a workshop on improving employee performance. Examples of fictional accounts appropriate for training and development (T&D) uses and the advantages of using workplace-related fictional stories for T&D purposes are discussed. Improving efficiency, providing a safe learning environment, avoiding groupthink, removing negative attitudes towards stories and increasing access to varied stories are the advantages of using fiction as a story source for T&D purposes. This account has practical implications for Human Resource and T&D professionals.
    Human Resource Development International 08/2014; 17(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Since the introduction of tuition fees for undergraduate programmes in the UK universities, there has been a great deal of attention paid to the impact of the changes on higher education. But the lack of coverage given to the effects of the growing consumerist discourse that was influencing teaching methods and assessment approaches was puzzling [Naidoo, R., and I. Jamieson. 2005. “Empowering Participants or Corroding Learning? Towards a Research Agenda on the Impact of Student Consumerism in Higher Education.” Journal of Education Policy 20 (3): 267–281]. There has been a similar silence within the critical management education (CME) literature despite the anecdotal accounts of the progressive erosion of the educational space for criticality. The changes to the educational environment present an opportunity to take stock of how critical approaches are able to respond – or if they are able to respond – to a more consumerist environment where different generational priorities and expectations of education are being expressed. This paper seeks to open up the debate and outline a research agenda to examine CME in the new higher education in the context of marketization, generational change and internationalization.
    Human Resource Development International 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This paper is a retrospective of the 12th International Conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (Asia Chapter) that took place in Taipei, Taiwan on 5–8 November 2013. This paper provides a brief review of pre-conference workshops, keynote and innovation addresses, parallel sessions and cultural activities. The authors also share their thoughts on the contributions of international conferences to the field of human resource development.
    Human Resource Development International 05/2014; 17(3).
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    ABSTRACT: There are few career studies that examine the unfolding of the careers of women managers in the Arab Gulf states. Based on in-depth interviews, this study examines the career paths of women managers in the United Arab Emirates. The current study demonstrates how the careers of women in this country unfold in a multidimensional perspective, within the country’s unique macro-cultural and meso-organizational contexts. The findings also reveal how the women managers adopt some aspects of the contemporary careers to fight or rebel against the gender discrimination, inequality and bureaucracy that are inherent within their traditional careers. The study ultimately provides some recommendations with implications for human resources development and the further advancement of women’s careers.
    Human Resource Development International 05/2014; 17(3).
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we examined the curricular and institutional characteristics of HRD master’s programmes in the United States. Our sample included 108 programmes in 100 institutions that were self-identified as HRD programmes. Among our findings: (1) fewer programmes were located in schools of education (44%) and more were located in schools of business (28%) than indicated by previous research; (2) there was greater homogeneity in curriculum among programmes in the same institutional locations (e.g. schools of education or schools of business) and greater variation among programmes in different institutional locations; (3) the curriculum of programmes located in schools of education tended to focus on traditional educational topics such as adult learning and instructional design, while the curriculum of programmes located in school of business tended to focus on management topics such as organization development, staffing and employment law. Our findings suggest that the nature of HRD as an academic subject varies with institutional location, as do the skill sets of students who graduate from HRD programmes. Future research should take these differences into account.
    Human Resource Development International 05/2014; 17(3).
  • Human Resource Development International 05/2014; 17(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Organizations are often confronted with the challenges of developing global leaders who can function effectively in different cultural contexts. The existing scholar-practitioner literature offers limited information regarding evidence-based practices for developing global leaders who are called to exercise effective leadership in different cultures. The interview presented here is an attempt to highlight some of the unique challenges and opportunities senior executives face when they operate in international contexts.
    Human Resource Development International 05/2014; 17(3).
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    ABSTRACT: We examined transfer from a training intervention in a management-development programme that focused on general management skills. Our sample included union (n = 57) and non-union (n = 119) leaders. Transfer was evaluated using multi-source feedback and surveys. A quasi-experiment was also conducted where one group was trained to develop self-management contracts that included longer term (i.e., distal) goals while the second group was trained to develop self-management contracts where they broke their longer term goals into shorter term (i.e., proximal plus distal) goals. The overall training programme increased self-efficacy and transfer. No significant differences were found between the two self-management conditions on any key measures.
    Human Resource Development International 05/2014; 17(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Using the critical incident (CI) technique, concrete examples of effective and ineffective managerial behaviour (CIs) were collected from managers and non-managerial employees within private and public sector organizations situated in the north and southeast regions of Mexico. The CIs were content analysed using open, axial and selective coding to identify a smaller number of thematic categories. A total of 38 ‘manager’ and 35 ‘non-managerial employee’ behavioural categories were identified respectively, of which 82.19% (n = 60) were found to be either convergent or polar opposite in meaning. The findings suggest that what behaviourally differentiates effective managers from ineffective managers is perceived, described and defined by Mexican managers and non-managerial employees in much the same way. The study provides new insights on the issue of perceived managerial and leadership effectiveness in Mexico and is a rare example of indigenous managerial behaviour research in a non-Anglo country.
    Human Resource Development International 05/2014; 17(3).
  • Human Resource Development International 05/2014; 17(3).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper provides an overview and analysis of the ‘localization’ of human resource capital in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia referred to as the ‘Saudization’. It attempts to critically review the key initiatives undertaken by the government and its stakeholders for the workforce localization in the Kingdom. It examines the Saudization process initiated in the Saudi public and private sectors and its efficacy in dealing with the challenges of replacement of the expatriate workforce and the skill development strategy. There is a strong need to adopt a comprehensive human resource development (HRD) framework to develop local employees and aligning it with the demands of the job market. A holistic Saudization policy is needed which can bridge the gap of talent and skills required after the removal of the expatriate workers. A multi-pronged approach involving all stakeholders can help Saudi firms in dealing with the emergent business challenges in the present global scenario.
    Human Resource Development International 03/2014; 17(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Skills and training policy will be a significant issue at the next UK general election in 2015 and youth unemployment is likely to be especially prominent. However, there has been a consistent failure to address the underlying problem and to consider its causes. Instead an increase in the number of apprenticeships, now increasingly loosely defined, has been seized upon as a solution by all sides in the debate. As a result another policy failure is likely. The article concludes with an alternative proposal, based on a change in the Companies Act.
    Human Resource Development International 03/2014; 17(2).