Journal of Clinical Nursing (J Clin Nurs )

Publisher: Blackwell Publishing

Description

Journal of Clinical Nursing is the ideal information resource for nurses everywhere seeking to enhance their practice. Focusing directly on the theory and practice of nursing and highlighting matters of concern to practising nurses, Journal of Clinical Nursing covers important issues such as: the developing role of nurses and those who assist them; the relationship of nursing theory to current practice; methods of assessment, planning, intervention and evaluation; the clarification of concepts relevant to nursing practice; the organization of clinical nursing work; the nature of clinical nursing expertise; quality assurance in nursing; teamwork in health care; the integration of clinical, educational and research work.

  • Impact factor
    1.32
  • 5-year impact
    1.77
  • Cited half-life
    5.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.21
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.45
  • Website
    Journal of Clinical Nursing website
  • Other titles
    Journal of clinical nursing (Online)
  • ISSN
    1365-2702
  • OCLC
    45498353
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Blackwell Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Some journals impose embargoes typically of 6 or 12 months, occasionally of 24 months
    • no listing of affected journals available as yet
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's server, institutional server or subject-based server
    • Server must be non-commercial
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with set statement ("The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com")
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'Blackwell Publishing' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectives To evaluate the usability of the educational needs assessment tool in clinical practice, from a practitioner and patient perspective and to establish whether patients perceive that they are getting an equally good or equally inadequate education service for their needs. Background The educational needs assessment tool was developed to enable patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis to assess their education needs prior to a consultation with a health professional. The educational needs assessment tool has been translated into nine languages and measurement properties have been established, however, its usability in clinical practice has not been studied. Design A qualitative study embedded into a multicentre RCT in which patients had been randomised into either educational needs assessment tool-focused education (Experimental Group) or usual care (control group). Methods Both groups were seen by a clinical nurse specialist. Sixteen patients and four clinical nurse specialists were recruited from the Rheumatology Outpatient Departments of three Acute Hospitals within the U K. Data were collected by interviews with patients and clinical nurse specialist. Analysis followed the Framework approach. Results Patients and clinical nurse specialist found completion of the educational needs assessment tool straightforward, comprehensive and easy to use. Completing the educational needs assessment tool helped patients to focus on what they needed to know from the clinical nurse specialist. Patients in both the control group and the experimental group felt supported and reassured by their clinical nurse specialist and perceived that they received a good and adequate education provision. Conclusion This study provides useful insights into the ability of the educational needs assessment tool to assess the educational needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in routine clinical practice. Relevance to clinical practice The educational needs assessment tool would be useful as a structured guide for nurses when assessing and meeting individual patient educational needs. This has the potential to improve patient-centred care, involve patients more actively in their care and enhance the long-term effects of patient education provision.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
  • Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to develop a self-assessment tool aiming to raise telenurses' awareness of their communication and interpersonal competence, and highlight areas in need of improvement.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and concerns of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus, in a predominantly low socio-economic setting.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
  • Pamela J McCabe, Lori M Rhudy, Holli A DeVon
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesTo describe patients’ experiences from symptom onset to initial treatment for atrial fibrillation.Background The estimated number of individuals with atrial fibrillation globally in 2010 was 33·5 million. World-wide, each year, new cases of atrial fibrillation approach 5 million, and prevalence will increase 2·5-fold by 2050. As a result, clinicians worldwide will treat a growing number of patients with atrial fibrillation. Early intervention to promote atrial fibrillation self-management is critical to reduce associated complications of stroke and heart failure. Greater understanding of patients’ experiences from symptom onset to initial treatment for atrial fibrillation is needed to guide development of interventions to promote early effective self-management.DesignA descriptive qualitative design was used.Methods Twenty females and 21 males at an academic medical centre were interviewed using open-ended questions to explore their experiences from symptom onset to initial treatment for atrial fibrillation. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.ResultsParticipants’ mean age was 64·3 (SD = 10·1) years. Four themes were identified: (1) misinterpreting symptoms; (2) discovering the meaning of atrial fibrillation; (3) facing fears, uncertainty, and moving to acceptance; and (4) receiving validation and reassurance. Participants lacked knowledge of atrial fibrillation and took cues from providers’ responses to appraise symptoms and diagnosis. Fear and uncertainty were reduced when providers initiated prompt treatment and took time to explain atrial fibrillation. Patients appreciated receiving clear information about atrial fibrillation, were engaged in learning, and motivated to participate in their care.Conclusions Providers played a critical role in helping patients to develop an accurate understanding of atrial fibrillation, to cope with the new diagnosis, and motivated them to engage in effective self-management.Relevance to clinical practiceInsight into participant experiences from symptom onset to initial treatment for atrial fibrillation may inform development of interventions to promote effective atrial fibrillation self-management.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesTo examine whether and how stigma influences attitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence, and whether its effect varies by symptom severity.Background Urinary incontinence is prevalent among women, but few seek treatment. Negative attitudes towards urinary incontinence treatment inhibit from seeking care. Urinary incontinence is a stigmatised attribute. However, the relationship between stigma and attitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence has not been well understood.DesignThis was a cross-sectional community-based study.Methods We enrolled a sample of 305 women aged 40–65 years with stress urinary incontinence from three communities in a Chinese city between May–October in 2011. Data were collected on socio-demographic characteristics, urinary incontinence symptoms, stigma and attitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence using a self-reported questionnaire. Effects of stigma were analysed using path analysis.ResultsAttitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence were generally negative. For the total sample, all the stigma domains of social rejection, social isolation and internalised shame had direct negative effects on treatment-seeking attitudes. The public stigma domain of social rejection also indirectly affected treatment-seeking attitudes through increasing social isolation, as well as through increasing social isolation and then internalised shame. The final model accounted for 28% of the variance of treatment-seeking attitudes. Symptom severity influenced the strength of paths: the effect of internalised shame was higher in women with more severe urinary incontinence.Conclusions Stigma enhances the formation of negative attitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence; public stigma affects treatment-seeking attitudes through internalisation of social messages.Relevance to clinical practiceStigma reduction may help incontinent women to form positive treatment-seeking attitudes and engage them in treatment. Interventions should specifically target the self-stigma domains of social isolation and internalised shame in women with urinary incontinence to most efficiently increase their use of health care.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
  • Amartya Mukhopadhyay, Benjamin SH Leong, Adela Lua, Rana Aroos, Jie Jun Wong, Nicola Koh, Nicholette Goh, Kay Choong See, Jason Phua, Yanika Kowitlawakul
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesTo identify the differences in practices and perceptions of handovers between nurses and residents in the critical care setting, so as to improve the quality of the process.Background Critically ill patients with complex problems are ideal for the study of handovers. However, few handover studies have been conducted in intensive care units.DesignDescriptive study using questionnaires.Methods We interviewed all nurses and residents involved in handovers of patients admitted to and discharged from a medical intensive care unit over a period of one month. Interviews were guided by a questionnaire and conducted between 24–48 hours of handovers.ResultsOut of 672 eligible participants, 580 (290 nurses and 290 residents) agreed to participate in the study (86·3% response rate). Compared to residents, nurses received more training on handovers, covered issues specific to allied health specialties more frequently during handovers, and reviewed patients earlier after handovers. The perceived importance of the different components of handover varied significantly: donor residents, donor nurses, recipient residents and recipient nurses emphasised the overall management plan, case complexity, management plan over the next 48 hours and past medical history, including allergies, respectively. Satisfaction in the handover was related to pre-handover review of electronic medical records, handover training and clarity level in the management plan following the handover, with only the last factor remaining significant on multivariate analysis.Conclusions More nurses than residents received prior training in handovers. Nursing handovers were more inclusive of allied health specialties. The perceived importance of the components of handover varied. Greater clarity in management plans was associated with better satisfaction.Relevance to clinical practiceDeficiencies in the handover process (lack of prior training in handovers, not including allied health specialties and not reviewing electronic records before handover) were identified, thus providing opportunities for mutual learning between nurses and residents.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
  • Eric A. Biondi, Julie Albright Gottfried, Irene Dutko Fioravanti, Jan A. Schriefer, Claude Andrew Aligne, Michael S. Leonard
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesThis study aimed to determine the interobserver reliability between bedside nurses and attending physicians for a paediatric respiratory score as part of an asthma Integrated Care Pathway implementation.Background An Integrated Care Pathway is one approach to improving quality of care for children hospitalised with asthma. Prior to implementation of the integrated care pathway, it was necessary to train nursing staff on the use of a respiratory assessment tool and to evaluate the interobserver reliability use of this tool.DesignProspective study using a convenience sample of children hospitalised for a respiratory illness in an academic medical centre.Methods The respiratory assessment used was the Paediatric Asthma Score. Bedside nurse-attending physician (27 different RNs and three attending paediatric hospitalists) pairs performed 71 simultaneous patient assessments on 20 patients. Intraclass correlation coefficient and kappa statistics were used to assess interobserver reliability.ResultsThe overall intraclass correlation coefficient was nearly perfect where κ = 0·95, 95% CI (0·92, 0·97) and overall kappa for reliability based on clinically relevant score breakpoints was also high with κ = 0·82, 95% CI (0·75, 0·90). The majority of subgroup analyses revealed substantial to almost perfect agreement across a variety of diagnoses, age ranges, and individual score components.Conclusions Bedside nurses, with support and training from attending physicians, can perform respiratory assessments that agree almost perfectly with those of attending physicians.Relevance to clinical practiceThe use of an Integrated Care Pathway allows for optimal interprofessional collaboration between bedside nurses and attending physicians.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
  • Miyuki Takase, Sachiko Teraoka, Yabase Kousuke
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesThe aim of this study was to test the adequacy of the Competence-Turnover Intention Model, which was developed to identify how nursing competence could affect nurses’ turnover intention (nurses’ intention to voluntarily leave an organisation).Background Recent studies have suggested that the level of nursing competence is negatively related to nurses’ intention to leave their jobs, suggesting that a lack of competence threatens both the quality and quantity of the nursing workforce. However, the mechanism of how nursing competence affects nurses’ turnover intention has not been explored previously.DesignA cross-sectional survey design was used.Methods Surveys were distributed to 1337 Japanese registered nurses/midwives in October, 2013. The adequacy of the model was analysed using structural equation modelling.ResultsIn total, 766 questionnaires were returned, with a return rate of 57%. The model fitted well with the data. The results showed that the level of nursing competence was related positively to the quantity of organisational rewards they felt they had received, and negatively related to the level of exhaustion they experienced. Moreover, the perceived organisational rewards and exhaustion were correlated with nurses’ turnover intention through affective commitment.Conclusions The Competence-Turnover Intention Model is useful for explaining how nursing competence impacts on their turnover intention.Relevance to clinical practiceClinical implications derived from the findings are that: promoting nursing competence is key to improving not only the quality of care provided by nurses, but also to retaining the nursing workforce, and the model can be used to develop strategies that would mitigate their turnover intention.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
  • Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesThe aim of the study was to explore the experiences of older people as they self-managed following venous leg ulcer healing. The objectives were to describe the beliefs, attitudes, actions, enablers and barriers to self-management and to consider the impact of an e-learning client education package on how people approach recurrence prevention.Background Venous leg ulcers affect 1% of people worldwide and more than 3% of older people. Up to 70% of ulcers reoccur. Appreciation of the experience of self-management following healing can equip health services to more effectively prepare people for self-management in the longer term.DesignA descriptive exploratory design was used.Methods Older people who had received an e-learning education programme while their venous ulcer was active were interviewed after healing from July–September 2010. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed.ResultsParticipants believed in the efficacy of compression therapy, skin care, activity and exercise and healthy eating to prevent recurrence, and engage in activities that reflect recommendations of the education. As beliefs and conduct of self-management activities can change over time, regular professional monitoring and support would assist people to refine health goals, plan self-management activities and prevent recurrence.Conclusions Participation in a standardised education programme completed prior to healing informed successful self-management strategies among people who seek to prevent venous leg ulcer recurrence. Further research should consider the benefits of regular, ongoing professional monitoring and support among this group.Relevance to clinical practiceClinicians have a role in supporting their clients to know about, perform and believe in the importance of self-management strategies for healing and recurrence prevention. Clinicians require the capacity to support clients which standardised client education tools can facilitate.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
  • Karin Sjögren, Marie Lindkvist, Per‐Olof Sandman, Karin Zingmark, David Edvardsson
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesTo explore the relationship between staff characteristics, perceived work environment and person-centred care in residential aged care units.Background Person-centred care is often described as the model of choice in residential aged care and in the care of persons with dementia. Few empirical studies have reported on the relationship between how staff experience different aspects of their work and person-centred care.DesignThe study had a cross-sectional quantitative design.Methods Staff in 151 residential aged care units in Sweden (n = 1169) completed surveys which included questions about staff characteristics, valid and reliable measures of person-centred care, satisfaction with work and care, job strain, stress of conscience and psychosocial unit climate. Statistical analyses of correlations, group differences and multiple linear regression analysis estimated with generalised estimating equation were conducted.ResultsHigher levels of staff satisfaction, lower levels of job strain, lower levels of stress of conscience, higher levels of a supportive psychosocial unit climate and a higher proportion of staff with continuing education in dementia care were associated with higher levels of person-centred care. Job strain and a supportive psychosocial climate, explained most of the variation in person-centred care.Conclusions This study shows that the work environment as perceived by staff is associated with the extent to which staff perceive the care as being person-centred in residential aged care. These empirical findings support the theoretical postulation that the work environment is an important aspect of person-centred care.Relevance to clinical practicePromoting a positive and supportive psychosocial climate and a work environment where staff experience balance between demands and control in their work, to enable person-centred care practice, seems to be important implications for managers and leaders in residential aged care.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
  • Belgüzar Kara, Özge Kılıç
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
  • Krysia Hudson, Laura A Taylor, Sharon L Kozachik, Sarah J Shaefer, Marisa L Wilson
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesThe case study evaluated the Second Life perceived usability and the decision-making of insulin administration via situational awareness at two different simulation freezes during Second Life simulation.Background Due to safety issues stemming from nursing knowledge deficits of insulin administration, the use of simulation via practice in a virtual immersive environment, Second Life was evaluated in a case study of practicing nurses.DesignThis case study used a single convenience group, post-test design.Methods Perceived usability was evaluated using the System Usability Scale. Evaluation of decision-making was evaluated via Situational Awareness Score at two simulation freezes in the Second Life simulation with practicing nurses (n = 12).ResultsNurses with more years of practice reported difficulty in using Second Life. As age increased, the total Situational Awareness Score decreased. Day shift nurses were more likely to obtain a High Situational Awareness Score.Conclusions Although usability was nearly obtained, virtual immersive environments for nurses has promise to provide practice in aiding clinical decision-making.Relevance to clinical practiceFinding a new platform to allow all nurses to practice difficult clinical decisions is key. A virtual immersive environment, like Second Life, can provide simulation for nurses to practice making such difficult decisions.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this exploratory research was to understand how men experience their advanced cancer in relation to their perceptions of masculinity.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This article reviews the available literature that supports implementing bedside clinical handover in nursing clinical practice and then seeks to identify key issues if any.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the most effective position jaundiced neonates should assume during phototherapy from appraised randomised controlled trials.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 10/2014;