Journal of Clinical Nursing (J Clin Nurs )

Publisher: Blackwell Publishing

Description

Journal of Clinical Nursing is the ideal information resource for nurses everywhere seeking to enhance their practice. Focusing directly on the theory and practice of nursing and highlighting matters of concern to practising nurses, Journal of Clinical Nursing covers important issues such as: the developing role of nurses and those who assist them; the relationship of nursing theory to current practice; methods of assessment, planning, intervention and evaluation; the clarification of concepts relevant to nursing practice; the organization of clinical nursing work; the nature of clinical nursing expertise; quality assurance in nursing; teamwork in health care; the integration of clinical, educational and research work.

  • Impact factor
    1.32
  • 5-year impact
    1.77
  • Cited half-life
    5.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.21
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.45
  • Website
    Journal of Clinical Nursing website
  • Other titles
    Journal of clinical nursing (Online)
  • ISSN
    1365-2702
  • OCLC
    45498353
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Blackwell Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Some journals impose embargoes typically of 6 or 12 months, occasionally of 24 months
    • no listing of affected journals available as yet
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's server, institutional server or subject-based server
    • Server must be non-commercial
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with set statement ("The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com")
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'Blackwell Publishing' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To develop a questionnaire to address barriers and self-care behaviour among persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several instruments are available in the literature to measure barriers to self-care in this population, but many of them present limitations in its psychometric validation process, and lack of theoretical background. Content validation study using multiple qualitative methods. A systematic review was conducted, and two focus groups with fifteen participants (n = 15) were analysed to identify key topics and categories concerning barriers and self-care behaviour. These categories were used to generate items that were subjected to expert scrutiny, using the Delphi technique. The resulting list of items was tested for readability and comprehension by nine diabetic patients (n = 9), through cognitive interviews. The whole process was conducted in accordance with the Theory of Planned Behaviour. The mean age (standard deviation) of participants in the focus groups and cognitive interviews was 66·05 (8·47) and 63·11 (6·13) years, respectively. 46·7% of the members of the focus groups and 44·4% of those interviewed were female, and the mean duration (standard deviation) of their diabetes was 6·53 (3·17) and 4·89 (3·84) years, respectively. After the qualitative analysis, 27 codes were obtained. Thereafter, items were generated in accordance with the dimensions of this theory: attitudes towards the behaviour (n = 23), social norms (n = 13), perceived behavioural control (n = 17) and behavioural intention (n = 15). A rigorous process of content validation with multiple methods was implemented to obtain an instrument aimed at addressing barriers and self-care behaviour of patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. An instrument theoretically rooted and supported on professional and patients' views is available to assess self-care behaviours in patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. The evaluation of its reliability and construct validity will determine the instrument's value and practical application in the clinical context. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To identify factors that motivate older nurses to leave the workforce. As many older nurses are now reaching retirement age and will be eligible for government-funded pensions, governments are concerned about the impending financial burden. To prepare for this scenario, many are looking at increasing the age of retirement to 67 or 70 years. Little is known about how this will affect the continuing employment of older nurses and the consequences for employers and the nurses themselves if they remain longer in the workforce. Prospective randomised quantitative survey study. The Mature Age Workers Questionnaire, Job Descriptive Index and Job in General Scale were used to measure job satisfaction, intention to retire and factors encouraging retirement in registered nurses aged 45 years and over (n = 352) in Australia (July-August 2007). There were 319 respondents. The mean age proposed for leaving the workforce was 61·7 years. Key motivators were: financial considerations (40·1%), primarily financial security; nurse health (17·4%) and retirement age of partner (13·3%). Older nurses are leaving the workforce prior to retirement or pension age, primarily for financial, social and health reasons, taking with them significant experience and knowledge. As financial considerations are important in older nurses decisions to continue to work, increasing the age of retirement may retain them. However, consideration will need to be given to ensure that they continue to experience job satisfaction and are physically and mentally able to undertake demanding work. Increasing retirement age may retain older nurses in the workforce, however, the impact on the health of older nurses is not known, nor is the impact for employers of older nurses continuing to work known. Employers must facilitate workplace changes to accommodate older nurses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To consider using arm span rather than height for calculating the body mass index, as a parameter that offers greater long-term stability, for the nutritional assessment of persons aged over 65 years. The body mass index presents certain drawbacks for the nutritional screening of older people suffering malnutrition or at risk of malnutrition, due to the anthropometric changes that occur with increasing age, especially the progressive loss of height. Observational, cross-sectional study, using nonprobabilistic convenience sampling, with anthropometric measurements and nutritional screening in older men and women, divided into two groups: (1) aged 65-75 years and (2) aged over 75 years. Height and arm span were measured to calculate two separate indices of body mass: body mass index (weight/height) and body mass index.1 (weight/arm span). Nutritional screening was conducted using the Mini Nutritional Assessment Short-Form, which includes the body mass index as an anthropometric measure. Our results reveal statistically significant differences between the two indices, for the sample analysed. Body mass index.1 classifies a larger number of older people as suffering malnutrition and fewer as being at nutritional risk. When this new index is used, there is a displacement of the subjects at risk, thus increasing the number considered at risk of malnutrition and in need of appropriate therapeutic intervention. Therefore, the use of body mass index.1 would enable more people suffering malnutrition, who would otherwise remain untreated, to be attended. As arm span, as an anthropometric measure, remains unchanged over time, it could be used instead of height, as an alternative index (body mass index.1) to the conventional body mass index. Further research is needed to determine the association between body mass index.1 and clinical status parameters to determine optimum cut-off points. This study describes the greater stability of body mass index.1 with respect to body mass index for nutritional screening, and the resulting benefits for nutritional monitoring and intervention for older people. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 12/2014;
  • Journal of Clinical Nursing 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Uncover how women self-manage their own chronic illness while taking care of a dependent relative. International policies place special emphasis in promoting interventions addressed to control, prevent and care for people with chronic health conditions. Self-management is a crucial part of this care. Caregivers are more prone to have chronic illness than non-caregivers. They are confronted with dilemmas about taking care of themselves while taking care of their dependent relative and the rest of their families. Caregivers articulate strategies to enable them to focus their energy on caring. Qualitative study using constructivist grounded theory. Thirty-nine women caregivers with a chronic illness participated in the study. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews and two focus groups were carried out between April 2010-December 2011. Data were analysed using grounded theory procedures. Self-management helps women caregivers with a chronic illness to balance the demands of their own illness and those of the dependent relative. They self-manage their illness by self-regulating the treatment, by regulating their strength and by controlling their emotions. Women caregivers integrate effectively and creatively the management of their chronic illnesses within the complexities of family care. This renders their health needs invisible and reaffirms them as capable caregivers. Identifying self-management strategies of women caregivers allow health professionals to acknowledge and reinforce effective self-care measures and to deter those that are ineffective and lessen their quality of life. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This intervention study tested the feasibility and initial effect of Hearing Aid Reintroduction (HEAR) to assist persons aged 70 to 85 years adjust to hearing aids. Following this 30-day intervention, hearing aid use increased between 1 and 8 hr per day with 50% of participants able to wear them for at least 4 hr. Hearing aid satisfaction improved from not satisfied to satisfied overall. The study demonstrated that HEAR is feasible and could improve hearing aid use of a substantial number of older persons who had previously failed to adjust to their hearing aids and had given up. However, further testing among a larger and more diverse population is needed to better understand the effectiveness and sustainability of the intervention.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 12/2014; early e release.
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the degree of caregiver burden and family functioning among Taiwanese primary family caregivers of people with schizophrenia and to test its association with demographic characteristics, family demands, sense of coherence and family hardiness. Family caregiving is a great concern in mental illness. Yet, the correlates of caregiver burden and family functioning in primary family caregivers of individuals with schizophrenia still remain unclear. A cross-sectional descriptive study. A convenience sample of 137 primary family caregivers was recruited from two psychiatric outpatient clinics in Taiwan. Measures included a demographic information sheet and the Chinese versions of the Family Stressors Index, Family Strains Index, 13-item Sense of Coherence Scale, 18-item Caregiver Burden Scale, Family Hardiness Index and Family Adaptability, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve Index. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients, t-test, one-way analysis of variance and a stepwise multiple linear regression.3 RESULTS: Female caregivers, additional dependent relatives, increased family demands and decreased sense of coherence significantly increased caregiver burden, whereas siblings as caregivers reported lower degrees of burden than parental caregivers. Family caregivers with lower family demands, increased family hardiness and higher educational level had significantly enhanced family functioning. Sense of coherence was significantly correlated with family hardiness. Our findings highlighted the importance of sense of coherence and family hardiness in individual and family adaptation. Special attention needs to focus on therapeutic interventions that enhance sense of coherence and family hardiness, thereby improving the perception of burden of care and family functioning. Given the nature of family caregiving in schizophrenia, understanding of correlates of caregiver burden and family functioning would help provide useful avenues for the development of family-focused intervention in psychiatric mental health nursing practice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To identify the potential benefits of dementia specialist nursing and to inform the implementation of roles to support people with dementia during hospital admission. Extended stays and adverse events mean that hospital admissions are costly for people with dementia, and patient experiences and outcomes can be poor. Specialist nurses have been identified as having potential to enhance care quality, reduce excess stays and reduce costs, but the evidence base for dementia specialist nurse roles has not previously been synthesised. Scoping review. Cochrane Library, Campbell Collaboration, Clinical Evidence, Evidence-Based Medicine, York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, PubMed, Medline, CINAHL and PsycInfo databases and internet searches and personal libraries/expert consultation to identify grey literature. Initial scoping searches were used to inform more focused systematic searches. Studies directly evaluating dementia nurse specialist roles or giving evidence of effectiveness of interventions/services that could be delivered by them to improve core outcomes were identified by one reviewer and verified by a second reviewer. While direct evidence for the effectiveness of these roles is lacking, a number of areas were identified in which a nurse specialist role could make a contribution, including preventing adverse events and improving patient experiences and outcomes. There is a considerable body of evidence for the effectiveness of these interventions although the volume of evidence for specific interventions is not always significant. The evidence indicates that a skilled dementia specialist nurse, undertaking a clearly defined role, and working directly with people with dementia and their carers for a significant proportion of the time, could benefit people with dementia in hospitals and their family carers. Clear guidance for the development and implementation of dementia specialist nurse roles in acute hospital settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesTo critically appraise the available literature and summarise the evidence related to the use, prevalence, purpose and potential therapeutic benefits of intensive care unit diaries following survivors' discharge from hospital and identify areas for future exploration.Background Intensive care unit survivorship is increasing as are associated physical and psychological complications. These complications can impact on the quality of life of survivors and their families. Rehabilitation services for survivors have been sporadically implemented and lack an evidence base. Patient diaries in intensive care have been implemented in Scandinavia and Europe with the intention of filling memory gaps, enable survivors to set realistic recovery goals and cement their experiences in reality.DesignA review of original research articles.Methods The review used key terms and Boolean operators across a 34-year time frame in: CIHAHL, Medline, Scopus, Proquest, Informit and Google Scholar for research reports pertaining to the area of enquiry. Twenty-two original research articles met the inclusion criteria for this review.ResultsThe review concluded that diaries are prevalent in Scandinavia and parts of Europe but not elsewhere. The implementation and ongoing use of diaries is disparate and international guidelines to clarify this have been proposed. Evidence which demonstrates the potential of diaries in the reduction of the psychological complications following intensive care has recently emerged. Results from this review will inform future research in this area.Conclusions Further investigation is warranted to explore the potential benefits of diaries for survivors and improve the evidence base which is currently insufficient to inform practice. The exploration of prospective diarising in the recovery period for survivors is also justified.Relevance to clinical practiceIntensive care diaries are a cost effective intervention which may yield significant benefits to survivors.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesThe aim of this study was to explore the integration of the nurse practitioner role in Canadian nursing homes to enable its full potential to be realised for resident and family care. The objective was to determine nurse practitioners' patterns of work activities.Background Nurse practitioners were introduced in Canadian nursing homes a decade ago on a pilot basis. In recent years, government and nursing home sector interest in the role has grown along with the need for data to inform planning efforts.DesignThe study used a sequential mixed methods design using a national survey followed by case studies.MethodsA national survey of nurse practitioners included demographic items and the EverCare Nurse Practitioner Role and Activity Scale. Following the survey, case studies were conducted in four nursing homes. Data were collected using individual and focus group interviews, document reviews and field notes.ResultsTwenty-three of a target population of 26 nurse practitioners responded to the survey, two-thirds of whom provided services in nursing homes with one site and the remainder in nursing homes with as many as four sites. On average, nurse practitioners performed activities in communicator, clinician, care manager/coordinator and coach/educator subscales at least three to four times per week and activities in the collaborator subscale once a week. Of the 43 activities, nurse practitioners performed daily, most were in the clinician and communicator subscales. Case study interviews involved 150 participants. Findings complemented those of the survey and identified additional leadership activities.Conclusion Nurse practitioners undertake a range of primary health care and advanced practice activities which they adapt to meet the unique needs of nursing homes.Relevance to clinical practiceKnowledge of work patterns enables nursing homes to implement the full range of nurse practitioner roles and activities to enhance resident and family care.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 12/2014;
  • Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to develop a self-assessment tool aiming to raise telenurses' awareness of their communication and interpersonal competence, and highlight areas in need of improvement.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and concerns of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus, in a predominantly low socio-economic setting.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesThis article presents an integrative review of the evidence for combined motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioural interventions that promote medication adherence. We undertook this review to establish a scientific foundation for development of interventions to promote medication adherence and to guide clinical practice.Background The World Health Organization has designated medication adherence as a global problem. Motivational interviewing and cognitive behaviour interventions have been found to individually promote medication adherence. However, there is a gap in the literature on the effect of combined motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioural approaches to promote medication adherence.DesignIntegrative review.MethodsCOCHRANE, PubMed and CINAHL were searched to access relevant studies between 2004–2014. Inclusion criteria were interventions combining motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioural therapy with medication adherence as the outcome. Articles were assessed for measures of adherence and methodological rigour. Analysis was performed using an integrative review process.ResultsSix articles met the inclusion criteria. A randomised controlled trial reported pretreatment missed doses of 5·58 and post-treatment of 0·92 and trended towards significance. Four cohort studies had effect sizes of 0·19–0·35 (p < 0·05). A case study had a pretreatment adherence rate of 25% and post-treatment 77% (p < 0·01).Conclusions Although there were a limited number of studies on combined motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioural interventions, five out of six were effective at improving medication adherence. Future studies with large rigorous randomised trials are needed.Relevance to clinical practiceThis review provides clinicians with the state of the science in relation to combined motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioural therapy interventions that promote medication adherence. A summary of intervention components and talking points are provided to aid nurses in informing decision-making and translating evidence into practice.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesTo describe the experience of readmission from the perspective of the stroke survivor and family caregiver.Background Older stroke survivors are at an increased risk for readmission with approximately 40% being readmitted in the first year after stroke. Patients and their families are best positioned to provide information about factors associated with readmission, yet their perspectives have rarely been elicited.DesignDescriptive qualitative study.Methods This study included older stroke survivors who were readmitted to acute care from home in the six months following stroke, and their family caregivers. Participants were interviewed by telephone at approximately two weeks after discharge and a sub-set was also interviewed in person during the readmission. Interviews were audio-taped and content analysis was used to identify themes.ResultsFrom the 29 semi-structured interviews conducted with 20 stroke survivors and/or their caregivers, the following themes were identified: preparing to go home after the stroke, what to expect at home, complexity of medication management, support for self-care in the community and the influence of social factors.Conclusions This study provides the critical perspective of the stroke survivor and family caregiver into furthering our understanding of readmissions after stroke. Participants identified several areas for intervention including better discharge preparation and the need for support in the community for medication management and self-care. The findings suggest that interventions designed to reduce readmissions after stroke should be multifaceted in approach and extend across the continuum of care.Relevance to clinical practiceThe hospital level has been the focus of interventions to reduce preventable readmissions, but the results of this study suggest the importance of community-level care. The individual nature of each situation must be taken into account, including the postdischarge environment and the availability of social support.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesTo examine whether and how stigma influences attitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence, and whether its effect varies by symptom severity.Background Urinary incontinence is prevalent among women, but few seek treatment. Negative attitudes towards urinary incontinence treatment inhibit from seeking care. Urinary incontinence is a stigmatised attribute. However, the relationship between stigma and attitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence has not been well understood.DesignThis was a cross-sectional community-based study.Methods We enrolled a sample of 305 women aged 40–65 years with stress urinary incontinence from three communities in a Chinese city between May–October in 2011. Data were collected on socio-demographic characteristics, urinary incontinence symptoms, stigma and attitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence using a self-reported questionnaire. Effects of stigma were analysed using path analysis.ResultsAttitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence were generally negative. For the total sample, all the stigma domains of social rejection, social isolation and internalised shame had direct negative effects on treatment-seeking attitudes. The public stigma domain of social rejection also indirectly affected treatment-seeking attitudes through increasing social isolation, as well as through increasing social isolation and then internalised shame. The final model accounted for 28% of the variance of treatment-seeking attitudes. Symptom severity influenced the strength of paths: the effect of internalised shame was higher in women with more severe urinary incontinence.Conclusions Stigma enhances the formation of negative attitudes towards seeking treatment for urinary incontinence; public stigma affects treatment-seeking attitudes through internalisation of social messages.Relevance to clinical practiceStigma reduction may help incontinent women to form positive treatment-seeking attitudes and engage them in treatment. Interventions should specifically target the self-stigma domains of social isolation and internalised shame in women with urinary incontinence to most efficiently increase their use of health care.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesTo describe patients’ experiences from symptom onset to initial treatment for atrial fibrillation.Background The estimated number of individuals with atrial fibrillation globally in 2010 was 33·5 million. World-wide, each year, new cases of atrial fibrillation approach 5 million, and prevalence will increase 2·5-fold by 2050. As a result, clinicians worldwide will treat a growing number of patients with atrial fibrillation. Early intervention to promote atrial fibrillation self-management is critical to reduce associated complications of stroke and heart failure. Greater understanding of patients’ experiences from symptom onset to initial treatment for atrial fibrillation is needed to guide development of interventions to promote early effective self-management.DesignA descriptive qualitative design was used.Methods Twenty females and 21 males at an academic medical centre were interviewed using open-ended questions to explore their experiences from symptom onset to initial treatment for atrial fibrillation. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.ResultsParticipants’ mean age was 64·3 (SD = 10·1) years. Four themes were identified: (1) misinterpreting symptoms; (2) discovering the meaning of atrial fibrillation; (3) facing fears, uncertainty, and moving to acceptance; and (4) receiving validation and reassurance. Participants lacked knowledge of atrial fibrillation and took cues from providers’ responses to appraise symptoms and diagnosis. Fear and uncertainty were reduced when providers initiated prompt treatment and took time to explain atrial fibrillation. Patients appreciated receiving clear information about atrial fibrillation, were engaged in learning, and motivated to participate in their care.Conclusions Providers played a critical role in helping patients to develop an accurate understanding of atrial fibrillation, to cope with the new diagnosis, and motivated them to engage in effective self-management.Relevance to clinical practiceInsight into participant experiences from symptom onset to initial treatment for atrial fibrillation may inform development of interventions to promote effective atrial fibrillation self-management.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 11/2014;