Journal of Clinical Nursing (J Clin Nurs )

Publisher: Blackwell Publishing

Journal description

Journal of Clinical Nursing is the ideal information resource for nurses everywhere seeking to enhance their practice. Focusing directly on the theory and practice of nursing and highlighting matters of concern to practising nurses, Journal of Clinical Nursing covers important issues such as: the developing role of nurses and those who assist them; the relationship of nursing theory to current practice; methods of assessment, planning, intervention and evaluation; the clarification of concepts relevant to nursing practice; the organization of clinical nursing work; the nature of clinical nursing expertise; quality assurance in nursing; teamwork in health care; the integration of clinical, educational and research work.

Current impact factor: 1.23

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 1.233
2012 Impact Factor 1.316
2011 Impact Factor 1.118
2010 Impact Factor 1.228
2009 Impact Factor 1.194
2008 Impact Factor 1.376

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.77
Cited half-life 5.00
Immediacy index 0.21
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.45
Website Journal of Clinical Nursing website
Other titles Journal of clinical nursing (Online)
ISSN 1365-2702
OCLC 45498353
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Blackwell Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Some journals impose embargoes typically of 6 or 12 months, occasionally of 24 months
    • no listing of affected journals available as yet
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's server, institutional server or subject-based server
    • Server must be non-commercial
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with set statement ("The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com")
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'Blackwell Publishing' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • Journal of Clinical Nursing 03/2015; 24(5-6).
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the incidence, associated factors and adverse outcomes for initial inappropriate use of urinary catheters in hospitalised older patients. Urinary catheters can lead to substantial complications. The related factors and adverse outcomes associated with initial inappropriate urinary catheter use among hospitalised older patients have not been studied. Prospective cohort study. A total of 321 older patients admitted to the hospital in southern Taiwan having urinary catheters placed within 24 hours of admission were recruited. Demographic factors, voiding function history, health conditions and care conditions of catheter placement were collected through a review of medical records, interviewing participants or their primary caregivers. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection during hospitalisation, transfer to a nursing home, length of hospital stay and change in activities of daily living determined as outcomes. Criteria for urinary catheter placement were developed to identify inappropriate use. The incidence of initial inappropriate use of urinary catheters among hospitalised Taiwanese older patients was 38·3%. The rationale most often reported for initial inappropriate use was 'convenience of care' (49·6%). Factors associated with initial inappropriate use were, chronic constipation, urinary tract infection history, medical treatment diagnosis, cognitive impairment, depressive symptoms and independence in activities of daily living and, insertion of catheter during evening and night shifts and lack of nursing documentation of the rationale for catheterisation. Patients with initial inappropriate use showed greater decline in activities of daily living function between admission and discharge. Older patients with greater care needs may become the victims of initial inappropriate use of urinary catheters. Inappropriate use may devastate the activities of daily living in older patients. Nurses' awareness of indications for urinary catheters may prevent inappropriate use. A policy to strengthen nurses' awareness of the use of urinary catheters is needed in Taiwan. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: To report an integrative review of evidence relating to dignity-conserving care in palliative care settings. It will also suggest avenues for future research. Research suggests that dignity is welcomed by those receiving palliative and end of life care. However, as dignity is a subjective term, it is not always explicit how this may be employed by nurses. Given that the preferred place of care for patients with palliative care needs is the home, the issue of dignity may be particularly important for community nurses. Therefore, synthesising evidence of dignity-conserving care for community nurses caring for people with palliative care needs provides clarity in a complex area of palliative care research. Integrative literature review. The review involved key bibliographic and review databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ASSIA and PsycInfo. Medical Subject Headings and free terms were undertaken for articles published from January 2009-September 2014 and retrieved papers were assessed against inclusion criteria. Final included articles were reviewed for reported dignity-conserving care actions, which were classified under nine themes of the Dignity Model. Thirty-one articles were included. Nine Dignity Model themes were used to classify care actions: Level of Independence; Symptom Distress; Dignity-Conserving Perspectives; Dignity-Conserving Practices; Privacy Boundaries; Social Support; Care Tenor; Burden to Others; and Aftermath Concerns. Reported care actions included listening, conveying empathy, communication and involving patients in care. Care actions could be classified under most of Dignity Model themes. However, there were less reported care actions related to Level of Independence and Aftermath Concerns, which meant that these had to be formulated independently. Future research should be structured around these areas to determine appropriate care actions for nurses to give dignity-conserving care that addresses these specific themes. Synthesising the available evidence of dignity-conserving care identifies evidence-based care actions and provides guidance to nurses in clinical practice caring for patients with palliative care needs. Future opportunities for research are identified to guide promotion of dignity in palliative care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: To identify the factors that predict maternal state anxiety when mothers and their sick children visit the outpatient unit of a paediatric hospital. While previous studies have focused on predictors of anxiety in mothers with ill children, the existing literature is limited in study design, research timing, respondent characteristics, sample size and data analysis. A cross-sectional design with self-administered questionnaires. Mothers were recruited from the outpatient unit of a Japanese paediatric hospital (N = 1077). Participants' state anxiety scores were collected using the Japanese version of Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The independent variables were the mothers' and sick children's background information. Participants were 1077 mothers; 990 provided valid responses. Mothers' mean state anxiety score was 49·72. Significant predictors of maternal anxiety were mothers' childrearing anxiety, child age, the sick child having a fever, sick child having siblings, having a person providing childrearing support, the mother's first visit to the hospital, out-of-hours visit and severity of the child's illness. The overall model explained 21·6% of the variance (multiple regression analysis). As various factors predicted maternal anxiety, identifying methods to address these factors may reduce maternal state anxiety. There is potential for improved understanding of the predictors of maternal state anxiety to aid in the development of materials that would best measure anxiety. The present findings may also suggest some means of providing appropriate information and support to anxious mothers. Our findings cannot demonstrate causation, however, and teaching methods and supportive practices were not investigated; therefore, a qualitative study on the concrete content of maternal anxiety and an intervention study to create support services for anxious mothers is required. In addition, prospective or longitudinal studies are also important for investigating causation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;
  • Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate if socio-demographic factors, religiosity, HIV-related knowledge, Marianismo, history of having been tested for HIV, knowing someone who died of AIDS and HIV risk perception were predictive factors to HIV enacted stigma predictors among Chilean women. HIV infection is the number one cause of death among women during their reproductive years. In Chile, studies with people living with HIV demonstrate the existence of HIV-related stigma. However, limited evidence is available about the underlying causes of HIV enacted stigma that results in stigmatisation and discrimination. The current cross-sectional study is a secondary analysis of data collected to assess the impact of an HIV prevention intervention (Mano a Mano-Mujer) designed for Chilean women. A quasi-experimental design was used in the original study. This study was conducted in two communities in Santiago, Chile. The sample for this study consisted of 496 Chileans between ages 18-49. Descriptive statistics and multiple regression were used for the analysis. Participants in the study reported high levels (77·8%) of HIV enacted stigma. Higher levels of HIV-related knowledge were associated with lower levels of HIV enacted stigma. Women with higher education had lower levels of HIV enacted stigma than women with elementary education. In addition, greater levels of marianismo (cultural belief that women should be passive, faithful, and devoted to family) were associated with higher HIV enacted stigma scores. The findings reflected the presence of HIV enacted stigma among Chilean women. Identifying the significant predictors of HIV enacted stigma can help the nursing community to design HIV prevention interventions that include the reduction in HIV enacted stigma. HIV evidence-based prevention interventions should incorporate contents related to stigma to contribute to prevent HIV enacted stigma at individual and community levels in accordance with the bioecological model. The results of this study could serve to develop HIV prevention interventions that target the reduction in HIV enacted stigma. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this research was to examine the lived experiences of women with inflammatory bowel disease, by specifically exploring their management of their illness after diagnosis. Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic autoimmune disease that has no known cause or cure. It is composed of two types of conditions: Crohn's disease and Ulcerative Colitis which have similar signs and symptoms, but have distinct physiological properties. Currently, Canada has the highest reported prevalence and incidence rates of inflammatory bowel disease in the world (Molodecky et al. 2012). Despite these increasing rates, there is a lack of knowledge and understanding of the burdens associated with inflammatory bowel disease, in particular from the participant's perspective. Heuristic phenomenology was the theoretical orientation used for this study. Eight women (aged 30-50 years) with inflammatory bowel disease who resided in Southern Ontario were recruited. Each participant completed background questionnaires and a one-on-one semi-structured interview. Several salient themes were identified; however, this paper will solely focus on one theme, balancing my disease. To achieve balance, the women described changing dietary behaviours, adjusting daily routines and managing symptoms through medications. These modifications were described as being important in controlling inflammatory bowel disease symptomatology on a day-to-day basis. There are many triggers for inflammatory bowel disease symptomatology. As such, the means in which those with inflammatory bowel disease manage their conditions varies. Participants discussed using a combination of strategies to control their condition. This information is important for patients living with inflammatory bowel disease, their support people, and healthcare professionals to identify various key strategies to improve the quality of life and well-being of those affected by inflammatory bowel disease. Furthermore, this research provided a voice to women diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease by allowing them to openly convey their experiences of living with inflammatory bowel disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: To gain insight into cancer survivors' needs towards an eHealth application monitoring quality of life and targeting personalised access to supportive care. Supportive care in cancer addresses survivors' concerns and needs. However, many survivors are not taking advantage of supportive care provided. To enable cancer survivors to benefit, survivors' needs must be identified timely and effectively. An eHealth application could be a solution to meet patients' individual supportive care needs. A qualitative approach. Thirty cancer survivors (15 head and neck and 15 breast cancer survivors) participated. The majority were female (n = 20·67%). The mean age was 60 (SD 8·8) years. Mean time interval since treatment was 13·5 months (SD 10·5). All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. During the interviews, participants were asked about their unmet needs during follow-up care and a potential eHealth application. Data were analyzed independently by two coders and coded into key issues and themes. Cancer survivors commented that they felt unprepared for the post-treatment period and that their symptoms often remained unknown to care providers. Survivors also mentioned a suboptimal referral pattern to supportive care services. Mentioned advantages of an eHealth application were as follows: insight into the course of symptoms by monitoring, availability of information among follow-up appointments, receiving personalised advice and tailored supportive care. Cancer survivors identified several unmet needs during follow-up care. Most survivors were positive towards the proposed eHealth application and expressed that it could be a valuable addition to follow-up cancer care. Study results provide care providers with insight into barriers that impede survivors from obtaining optimal supportive care. This study also provides insight into the characteristics needed to design, build and implement an eHealth application targeting personalised access to supportive care from the survivors' perspective. Future studies should address the viewpoints of care providers, and investigate the usability of the eHealth application prototype to facilitate implementation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesTo examine parents’ knowledge about and attitudes towards pain management, use of pain relief strategies and satisfaction with their children's postoperative pain management, as well as the relationships among these variables.Background Children's postoperative pain is inadequately managed worldwide. Despite increasing emphasis on parental involvement in children's postoperative pain management, few studies have examined parents’ management of their child's postoperative pain in Singapore.DesignA descriptive correlational study.MethodsA convenience sample of 60 parents having 6- to 14-year-old children undergoing inpatient elective surgery in a public hospital in Singapore was recruited. Data were collected one day after each child's surgery using the Pain Management Knowledge and Attitudes questionnaire and the Parents’ Use of Pain Relief Strategies questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, Mann–Whitney U tests, Kruskal–Wallis tests and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used for data analyses.ResultsParents displayed moderate levels of knowledge, attitudes and use of pain relief methods in relation to their children's postoperative pain and pain management. They were generally satisfied with the management of their child's postoperative pain. There was significant difference in Parents’ Use of Pain Relief Strategies scores between parents with and without previous experience of caring for their hospitalised child. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between parents’ knowledge and attitude, knowledge and satisfaction, attitude and satisfaction, knowledge and pain relief strategies, as well as attitude and pain relief strategies.Conclusion This study indicates the need to provide parents with more information regarding their children's postoperative pain management. Future studies are needed to develop educational interventions for parents to improve their knowledge and attitudes, which will eventually improve their use of pain relief strategies for their children.Relevance to clinical practiceHealth professionals need to provide more information to equip parents with knowledge and skills regarding paediatric postoperative pain management.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and Objectives. This paper explores patients’ perspectives on infection prevention and control. Background. Healthcare-associated infections are the most frequent adverse event experienced by patients. Reduction strategies have predominantly addressed front- line clinicians’ practices; patients’ roles have been less explored. Design. Video-reflexive ethnography. Methods. Fieldwork undertaken at a large metropolitan hospital in Australia involved 300 hours of ethnographic observations, including 11 hours of video footage. This paper focuses on eight occasions, where video footage was shown back to patients in one-on-one reflexive sessions. Findings. Viewing and discussing video footage of clinical care enabled patients to become articulate about infection risks, and to identify their own roles in reducing transmission. Barriers to detailed understandings of preventative practices and their roles included lack of conversation between patients and clinicians about infection prevention and control, and being ignored or contradicted when challenging perceived suboptimal practice. It became evident that to compensate for clinicians’ lack of engagement around infection control, participants had developed a range of strategies, of variable effectiveness, to protect themselves and others. Finally, the reflexive process engendered closer scrutiny and a more critical attitude to infection control that increased patients’ sense of agency. Conclusion. This study found that patients actively contribute to their own safety. Their success, however, depends on the quality of patient–provider relationships and conversations. Rather than treating patients as passive recipients of infection
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesTo describe and explain the lifestyle habits of hospital-admitted stroke patients by identifying relationships between the different lifestyle habits and by examining associations between them and clinical measurements.Background Stroke is associated with several risk factors that are closely intertwined. However, lifestyle factors have profound effects on its incidence. It has been shown that healthy lifestyle habits are associated with a reduced stroke risk both in combination and independently.DesignA cross-sectional, exploratory study.Methods Data were collected from stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients (n = 150) in an acute neurology unit in Finland between January 2010 and October 2011 using the Lifestyle Instrument. Data analysis was performed by cross-tabulation of variables, factor analysis, analysis of variance and logistic regression.ResultsPatients with a mean age of 56·5 participated. Based on their body mass index, most were overweight (43·2%) or obese (31·8%). Their waist circumference levels indicated significant health problems in most cases (70%). Their mean glucose (5·6 mmol/l) and blood pressure (149·9/86·7 mmHg) levels were also above the guideline values. The participants had diverse risk factor-related lifestyle habits. There were several statistically significant differences between the different lifestyle habits and most of the clinical data were at least partly explained by the lifestyle habits.Conclusions The participants in this study had many lifestyle habits that are associated with stroke risk factors, exposing them to an elevated risk of a new stroke in the future.Relevance to clinical practiceIt is an important obligation for nursing staff courageously to bring up the lifestyle habits at the hospital phase and point out that there is a relationship between them and stroke incidence and that secondary stroke can be prevented or made less likely by adopting a healthy lifestyle.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesTo examine the frequency of human immunodeficiency virus testing and sexually transmitted infection testing among older adults (50 years and older), present factors related to human immunodeficiency virus and sexually transmitted infection testing among older adults, and summarise the perspectives and practices of older adults and health care providers related to sexual health communication.Background Reported cases of sexually transmitted infections and human immunodeficiency virus among older adults have increased, therefore refuting the stereotype of the sexually inactive older adult.DesignIntegrative review.Methods Database searches in PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Web of Science; manual reference list searches; and database searches for articles that cited previously identified articles.ResultsThere is limited research on this topic and considerable diversity in the populations studied and outcomes measured. The search process yielded 20 articles meeting the eligibility criteria. Human immunodeficiency virus and sexually transmitted infection testing of older adults are infrequent. Human immunodeficiency virus testing among older adults is associated with perceived risk of contracting human immunodeficiency virus and influenced by encouragement from health care providers. Sexually transmitted infection testing due to genital symptoms is more likely than asymptomatic screening. Few providers collect routine sexual histories from older adult patients, although older adults are receptive to sexual history taking.Conclusions There are missed opportunities to identify sexually transmitted infections and human immunodeficiency virus in older adults. Stereotypes and assumptions have hindered providers from identifying and testing older adults at risk for human immunodeficiency virus and sexually transmitted infections.Relevance to clinical practiceSexual health assessment is essential to comprehensive health care. A sexual history provides information that may indicate human immunodeficiency virus and sexually transmitted infection testing. Detection and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus and sexually transmitted infections will break the chain of infection and improve quality of life.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesTo evaluate the one-year prognosis of a lifestyle counselling intervention (diet, smoking cessation and exercise) among patients who had open heart surgery.Background Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity worldwide in both developing and developed countries. Lifestyle modification plays an important role for patients who are at a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and for those with an established cardiovascular disease.DesignRandomised, nonblind and lifestyle counselling intervention study with a one-year follow-up.MethodsA randomised, nonblind intervention study was performed on 500 patients who had open heart surgery. After hospital discharge, 250 patients (intervention group) were randomly allocated lifestyle counselling according to the recent guidelines provided by the European Society of Cardiology (European Journal Preventive Cardiology, 19, 2012, 585). The remaining 250 patients (control group) received the regular instructions. Primary end-point was the development of a cardiovascular disease (nonfatal event) during the first year; secondary end-points included fatal events, smoking abstinence, dietary habits and a physical activity evaluation.ResultsAccording to the primary end-point, the odds of having a nonfatal cardiovascular disease event are 0·56-times (95%CI 0·28, 0·96, p = 0·03) lower for the intervention group compared to the control group. One-year after surgery, it was found that participants in the intervention group were 1·96-times (95%CI 1·31, 2·93, p < 0·001) more likely to achieve dietary recommendations, 3·32-times (95%CI 2·24, 4·91, p < 0·001) more likely to achieve physical activity recommendations and 1·34-times (95%CI 1·15, 1·56, p < 0·001) more likely to return to work.Conclusion Lifestyle counselling intervention following open heart surgery can improve health outcomes and reduce the risk of a new cardiac event. Health care services must recommend and organise well-structured cardiac rehabilitation programmes adjusted to the patient's needs.Relevance to clinical practiceA well-structured cardiac rehabilitation programme adjusted to the patient's profile is a safe and cost-effective way to improve patients' outcome.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesTo compare the influence of a systematic nursing intervention on primary caregivers' knowledge and skills about nasogastric tube feeding and the number of nasogastric tube-related complications with that of routine nursing instructionsBackground To ensure the quality of care and reduce the incidence of complications, it is crucial that primary caregivers receive comprehensive health education about nasogastric tube feeding before hospital discharge.DesignA quasi-experimental research with pretest/post-test evaluations.Methods The control group included 127 inpatients whose caregivers received routine education about nasogastric tube feeding, while the experimental group included 106 inpatients whose caregivers received systematic nursing intervention including comprehensive educational pamphlets and video education. The evaluation questionnaire included demographic variables, a nasogastric tube care knowledge scale, and a nasogastric tube skills assessment scale. The post-test was administered after the caregiver performed nasogastric tube feeding for the first time, and complications were noted at follow-up within three months of discharge.ResultsIn terms of post-test knowledge and skills, the experimental group scored significantly higher than the control group, despite no difference in the pretests. In addition, the incidence rates for constipation, diarrhoea and abdominal distention were lower in the experimental group.Conclusions Systematic nursing intervention, including comprehensive educational pamphlets and video education, significantly improved the knowledge and skills of primary caregivers for nasogastric tube feeding. The increased ability of caregivers may have contributed to less incidence of complication.Relevance to clinical practiceThe results of this study underlined the importance of developing nasogastric tube-related nursing interventions and educational strategies for clinical nurses, home care nurses and caregivers. The research tool used here may serve as a reference for assessing the technical operations of healthcare professionals and the knowledge and skills of caregivers.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesTo describe the perspectives of expectant mothers and fathers on fathers' involvement during pregnancy.Background Becoming a father is a major life event and paternal involvement during pregnancy has a positive influence on the family. However, research into both expectant mothers' and fathers' perspectives on fathers' involvement during pregnancy is relatively scarce.DesignA descriptive qualitative study was used.Methods Thirty expectant parents (20 women and 10 men) were interviewed either as part of one of four focus groups or in an individual interview. Qualitative content analysis was performed on the interview transcripts.ResultsA theme of ‘Paddling upstream’ emerged as an expression of the latent content of the interviews concerning perspectives on fathers' involvement. Five sub-themes described the manifest content: trying to participate, trying to be understanding, trying to learn, trying to be a calming influence and trying to find a balanced life. Expectant parents suggested several ways to improve fathers' involvement and to meet parents' need for shared involvement.Conclusion Expectant mothers and fathers wanted the father to be more involved in the pregnancy. Although fathers attempted different strategies, they did not always perceive what was expected of them and encountered many barriers as they tried to navigate through this unique experience. The best support for the father was the mother. Expectant parents wanted their healthcare to include the father more thoroughly and to focus on the whole family.Relevance to clinical practicePrenatal care professionals can overcome barriers that prevent paternal involvement. Although fathers are not able to engage in the pregnancy on the same level as the mother, we suggest that their specific needs also be recognised through an increased awareness of gender norms in healthcare.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;
  • Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015; 24(3-4).
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    ABSTRACT: Aims and objectivesThis article presents findings from a study that explored nurses' and personal care assistants' role in improving the relocation of older people into a nursing home.Background Suggestions for improving the relocation process for older people moving into a nursing home have been the outcomes of studies that have interviewed residents and their families. However, the views of nurses and personal care assistants working in nursing homes have not been previously explored.DesignAn exploratory, descriptive qualitative research design.Methods Individual interviews were conducted with 20 care staff (seven registered nurses, five enrolled nurses and eight personal care assistants) employed at four nursing homes.FindingsUsing thematic analysis, two key themes were identified: ‘What it's like for them’ – highlighted staffs' awareness of the advantages, disadvantages and meaning of relocation, and focused on staffing and nursing care; other services provided and the environment. The second theme – ‘We can make it better’, revealed suggestions for improving the relocation process, and included spending time with new residents and the importance of a person-centred approach to care.Conclusion Care staff have an important role in improving the relocation process of older people into a nursing home, as well as contributing to the discussion on this important clinical topic.Relevance to clinical practiceChallenging care staff to acknowledge the importance of their role in helping older people settle into a nursing home is a key requirement of nursing practice in aged care. Nursing practice guidelines, with a focus on person-centred care, on how to manage the relocation process for an older person and their family are required for this aspect of nursing home care. Education of staff on relocation policies and procedures is essential to ensure that residents and their families are supported through this process.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 02/2015;