Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (J Obstet Gynaecol )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology represents an established forum for the entire field of obstetrics and gynaecology, publishing a broad range of original, peer-reviewed papers, from scientific and clinical research to reviews relevant to practice and case reports. It also includes occasional supplements on clinical symposia. The journal continues to attract a world-wide readership thanks to the emphasis on practical applicability and its excellent record of drawing on an international base of authors.

  • Impact factor
    0.43
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    5.30
  • Immediacy index
    0.02
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology website
  • Other titles
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology (Online), Journal of obstetrics and gynecology
  • ISSN
    1364-6893
  • OCLC
    37915558
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Placenta praevia (PP) is an important cause of maternal and fetal morbidity. We reviewed the characteristics and management of PP at the Aberdeen Maternity Hospital (AMH) to evaluate performance. In the years 2009-2011, a total of 60 cases with confirmed PP underwent caesarean section (CS) at the AMH. Two-fifths of cases had previous CS and two-thirds were posterior praevias. Four-fifths were major praevias. Diagnosis was mostly by trans-abdominal scanning (TAS). A little less than two-thirds underwent hospital admission (half of them for antepartum haemorrhage). Most received steroid and ferrous sulphate as appropriate. The majority were delivered at greater than 36 weeks' gestation. There was good support in theatre by senior obstetricians and anaesthetists. Cell salvage was used in theatre. Overall, the outcomes were good. Improvements could be made on documentation of counselling preoperatively and practice of trans-vaginal scans (TVS) to confirm low lying placentae even at ta 20-week scan for better diagnosis, as per the RCOG guidelines.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 04/2014;
  • Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 04/2014;
  • Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 04/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of obesity during pregnancy is rising. Elevated BMI is a significant risk factor for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, including primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Addressing the issues surrounding obesity in pregnancy presents many biological, social and psychological challenges. BMI is an easily measured and modifiable anthropometrical risk factor and should be recorded in all pregnancies. BMI should be proactively managed prior to and during pregnancy. All women should be educated as to the risks of an elevated BMI during pregnancy and those at risk should have access to specialist medical and surgical support if required. Our aim was to investigate the associations between elevated BMI and adverse maternal and fetal outcomes including PPH, and to explore the psychological challenges of having an elevated BMI during pregnancy.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 04/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the treatment of postpartum haemorrhage from uterine atony, uterine compression sutures, such as the B-Lynch suture and its modifications have a role with the advantage of preservation of the uterus for fertility. There is however, a risk that apposition of the anterior and posterior walls of the uterus will impede drainage of lochia, resulting in undesirable complications. We undertook a 5-year retrospective study of all women who underwent uterine compression sutures at the KK Women's and Children's Hospital, between 2008 and 2012. In total, 23 women had uterine compression sutures during the study period, of which, 19 women managed to conserve their uterus. Our complication rate was 25%, which included persistent vaginal discharge, pyometra and endometritis. There were three conceptions, with two successful pregnancies. Our study shows uterine compression suture to be a safe and effective alternative to avoid hysterectomy with preservation of fertility at the time of major postpartum haemorrhage. The outcome of subsequent pregnancies is reassuring.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 03/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cetirizine, a second-generation antihistamine, is an active metabolite of hydroxyzine and it is used in the treatment of allergies, but the data on fetal safety are inconclusive. Pregnant women who were counselled by the 'Motherisk Program' regarding cetirizine exposure were enrolled in a cohort study and compared with pregnant women counselled for non-teratogenic exposures. The objective was to measure the rate of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Subsequently, we also conducted meta-analysis of cohort studies that examined the pregnancy outcomes of women exposed to hydroxyzine or cetirizine during pregnancy. In the cohort study, there were no significant differences in the rates of major malformations between the cetirizine exposed and comparison group. In the meta-analysis, cetirizine was not associated with increased teratogenic risk. In contrast, a meta-analysis of cetirizine and hydroxyzine studies showed a marginal association with major malformations. Cetirizine is not associated with a clinically important increase in risk of adverse fetal outcomes.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 03/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Maximum bladder volume could be a simple surrogate measure to screen for detrusor overactivity (DO) which manifests with frequency and small volume voids. Urodynamic traces from 577 women were reviewed. Maximum bladder volume was obtained from bladder diary. The urodynamic traces were reviewed for data and were categorised as normal, urodynamic stress incontinence, mixed incontinence and DO. The urodynamic data and maximum voided volume were compared between different categories and Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed. The median value for maximum voided volume for women with DO was not significantly different from the other categories, whereas significant differences were found for the median values for urodynamic variables. ROC curves demonstrated extremely poor sensitivity and specificity for recorded maximum bladder volume and for urodynamic variables. The maximum voided volume recorded on a 3-day bladder diary is not discriminatory as a screening test for DO.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 03/2014;
  • Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 03/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this randomised prospective study was to investigate the impact of preoperative gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) compared with a control group with myomectomy. A total of 36 women (n = 36, group 1) with fibroids were randomised to receive either 2 monthly doses (n = 18/36, group 1a) or 3 monthly doses of goserelin (n = 18/36, group 1b) prior to myomectomy. The 32 women who received no treatment (group 2) comprised the controls. All patients had similar demographic features. There were no significant differences among the three groups with respect to: (1) mean intraoperative blood loss; (2) preoperative and postoperative blood transfusion or (3) length of hospital stay. The only advantage of administering GnRHa prior to myomectomy for symptomatic fibroids in our population was a higher haemoglobin level prior to surgery among the women who received 3 doses of the drug.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 03/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ventriculomegaly (VM) is a marker of aneuploidy and warrants a detailed examination of fetal anatomy. Chromosomal abnormalities worsen the fetal and neonatal prognosis significantly and karyotyping of fetuses is critically important when accompanying anomalies are detected. Here, we report the genetic results of 140 fetuses with isolated and non-isolated VM detected during a 2nd trimester ultrasound examination followed by invasive in utero diagnostic procedures for karyotyping. VM was diagnosed in seven (5%) fetuses with abnormal karyotype and the chromosomal abnormality incidence was higher in severe VM (6.8%) than mild (4.2%). Higher chromosomal abnormality rates were detected when VM was isolated (8.6%), rather than associated with any anomaly (3.8%). These results suggest that karyotype analysis should be offered to all patients with any degree of VM, regardless of its association with structural anomalies.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 03/2014;
  • Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 03/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Prematurity is the chief cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study is to review the different methods for predicting preterm delivery in asymptomatic pregnant women and in situations of threatened preterm delivery. A search of the Pubmed/Medline database was carried out for the years 1980-2012. We included studies for predicting preterm birth in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Models for predicting preterm delivery based on maternal factors, cervical length and obstetric history in 1st trimester of pregnancy is a valuable avenue of research. Nevertheless, prediction accuracy still needs to be improved. In the 2nd and 3rd trimesters, routine digital vaginal examination is of no value in asymptomatic women. Echography of the cervix is not useful except in patients with a history of late miscarriage or preterm delivery in order to offer them a preventive treatment. In symptomatic women, the combination of digital vaginal examination, cervical echography and fibronectin gives the best predictive results. Electromyography of the uterus and elastography of the cervix are interesting avenues for future research. Identifying patients at risk of preterm delivery should be considered differently at each stage of pregnancy.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 03/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We aimed to evaluate the membrane expression of DcR1 and DcR2 in the normal endometrium (NE), endometrial atypical hyperplasia (EAH) and endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC). The study comprised 101 patients: 20 NE, 14 EAH and 67 EEC. Membrane expression of DcR1 and DcR2 was examined and presented as total score (TS). The membrane expression of both DcR1 and DcR2 was more common in EEC than in NE (p < 0.001; p < 0.001). A strong correlation was found between type of endometrial tissue (NE/EAH/EEC) and the TS of DcR1 (p = 0.001) and DcR2 (p < 0.001). In EEC, the TS of DcR1 and DcR2 was not related to grading and survival. The TS of DcR1 negatively correlated with staging (p = 0.018), but DcR2 did not. The membrane expression of decoy receptors for TRAIL DcR1 and DcR2 is greater in NE than EEC. In EEC patients, membrane expression of DcR1 and DcR2 are not independent predictors of survival.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 03/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper aims to clarify the nature of the pain in provoked vestibulodynia (PV). It reviews published data about the nature of the pain in PV, employing a recent pain classification, which divides pain from a neurobiological perspective, into nociceptive, inflammatory and pathological pain, with the latter subdivided into neuropathic and dysfunctional pain. Nociceptive pain is high-threshold pain provoked by noxious stimuli; inflammatory pain is adaptive, low-threshold pain associated with peripheral tissue inflammation; pathological pain is maladaptive, low-threshold pain caused by structural damage to the nervous system (neuropathic) or by its abnormal function (dysfunctional). Most of the published data show that in PV, there is no active peripheral tissue inflammation. Similarly, no neural damage has been demonstrated. It is reasonable to consider PV as dysfunctional pain induced by exposure to acute physical or psychological precipitating events in the presence of an individual predisposition to produce or maintain abnormal central sensitisation.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 03/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Early pregnancy complication remains a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Despite the paucity of evidence to support consultant-led early pregnancy unit over nurse- or sonographer-led services, hospitals have devoted scarce resources to appoint consultants to lead their early pregnancy units. We compared the management and outcomes of confirmed and suspected ectopic pregnancy 1 year before and 1 year after the transition from a nurse-led to a consultant-led early pregnancy unit in a London hospital. Our study showed improvements in the rates of negative laparoscopy, ruptured ectopic pregnancy during follow-up, need for laparotomy, ITU admission and length of stay and statistically significant reduction in operative intervention, without concomitant rise in morbidity or mortality in women with confirmed or suspected ectopic pregnancies.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 03/2014;
  • Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 02/2014; 34(2):196-7.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The evidence that perioperative antibiotics for caesarean delivery are effective in reducing infective morbidity is unequivocal. In developing countries, especially those with high HIV-prevalence, clinicians have increasingly become anxious about the efficacy of perioperative antibiotics, hence the adoption of treatment regimens, as described in this study. We set out to investigate if these fears have a basis by conducting a randomised clinical trial. The setting was two tertiary units in a developing country with a significant HIV-prevalence. The outcome measures assessed were: pyrexia, wound infection, admission with puerperal sepsis, laparotomy for pelvic abscess and duration of hospital stay. There was no statistically significant difference between the two arms of the study with regard to the above outcomes. Our conclusion is that the two antibiotic regimens are equivalent in preventing infection, therefore there is no justification for subjecting patients to week-long antibiotics and the unnecessary increase in nurse workload.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 02/2014; 34(2):160-4.
  • Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 02/2014; 34(2):191.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to assess factors associated with para-aortic lymph node metastasis in endometrioid adenocarcinoma. The data of 157 patients with endometrioid adenocancer, who underwent staging surgery, was reviewed retrospectively. A total of 23 patients (14.6%) had pelvic and 19 patients (12.1%) had para-aortic lymph node metastasis; 21% (4/19) of the patients with para-aortic lymph node involvement did not have pelvic lymph node metastasis. Para-aortic lymph node involvement was significantly more common in the presence of LVSI and pelvic lymph node metastasis, and pelvic lymph node metastasis was the only independent risk factor for para-aortic lymph node involvement. The sensitivity and NPV of positive pelvic lymph node in the prediction of para-aortic lymph node metastasis were found to be 78.9% and 97%, respectively. The corresponding rates for obturator and/or external iliac lymph node were 63.1% and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, although pelvic lymph node metastasis is the only independent risk factor for para-aortic lymph node involvement, negative pelvic lymph node is not enough to omit para-aortic lymph node dissection. On the other hand, intraoperative frozen section examination of obturator and/or external iliac lymph node to omit para-aortic lymphadenectomy might be a good option for the patients who have high medical risks for surgery.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 02/2014; 34(2):177-81.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Fetal/neonatal hyperthyroidism is a well-known complication of maternal Graves' disease with high concentrations of TSH-receptor antibodies (TRAb). Few data are available on the management of fetal hyperthyroidism in surgically treated Graves' disease. Methods: Clinical, ultrasound and biochemical data are reported in a fetus/neonate whose mother underwent a thyroidectomy > 10 years before and whose sibling was thin and hyperthyroid at birth. Results: Maternal TRAb were persistently > 40 U/l; unequivocal signs of fetal hyperthyroidism were identified at 29 weeks gestational age (GA). The fetus was treated through maternal antithyroid drug (ATD) administration; the dose was reduced gradually once fetal tachycardia and valve dysfunction disappeared and normal T4 was confirmed by fetal blood sampling. Maternal euthyroidism was maintained. The neonate showed normal growth for GA and T4 concentration at birth but severe hyperthyroidism relapsed from day 13 until day 58. TSH remained strongly suppressed throughout the pre- and postnatal course. Conclusions: Prenatal ATD in a taper-off regime allowed normal T4 and growth in a hyperthyroid fetus from a thyroidectomised Graves' mother. Fetal TSH cannot be used to adjust the ATD dose. Prenatal ATD appears to postpone the onset but does not affect the severity or duration of the neonatal hyperthyroid flare.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology: the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 02/2014; 34(2):117-22.

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