Neurogenetics (Neurogenetics )

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Description

Neurogenetics publishes findings that contribute to a better understanding of the genetic basis of normal and abnormal function of the nervous system. Neurogenetic disorders is the main focus of the journal. Neurogenetics therefore includes findings in humans and other organisms that help understand neurological disease mechanisms and publishes papers from many different fields such as biophysics cell biology human genetics neuroanatomy neurochemistry neurology neuropathology neurosurgery and psychiatry. Neurogenetics is published quaterly in hardcopy and online on the World Wide Web and includes Review articles Original articles Short communications and Letters to the editors.

  • Impact factor
    3.58
  • 5-year impact
    3.37
  • Cited half-life
    4.70
  • Immediacy index
    0.66
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    1.23
  • Website
    Neurogenetics website
  • Other titles
    Neurogenetics (Online)
  • ISSN
    1364-6753
  • OCLC
    43498218
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors own final version only can be archived
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's website or institutional repository
    • On funders designated website/repository after 12 months at the funders request or as a result of legal obligation
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mitochondrial myopathies belong to a larger group of systemic diseases caused by morphological or biochemical abnormalities of mitochondria. Mitochondrial disorders can be caused by mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genome. Only 5 % of all mitochondrial disorders are autosomal dominant. We analyzed DNA from members of the previously reported Puerto Rican kindred with an autosomal dominant mitochondrial myopathy (Heimann-Patterson et al. 1997). Linkage analysis suggested a putative locus on the pericentric region of the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q11). Using the tools of integrative genomics, we established chromosome 22 open reading frame 16 (C22orf16) (later designated as CHCHD10) as the only high-scoring mitochondrial candidate gene in our minimal candidate region. Sequence analysis revealed a double-missense mutation (R15S and G58R) in cis in CHCHD10 which encodes a coiled coil-helix-coiled coil-helix protein of unknown function. These two mutations completely co-segregated with the disease phenotype and were absent in 1,481 Caucasian and 80 Hispanic (including 32 Puerto Rican) controls. Expression profiling showed that CHCHD10 is enriched in skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial localization of the CHCHD10 protein was confirmed using immunofluorescence in cells expressing either wild-type or mutant CHCHD10. We found that the expression of the G58R, but not the R15S, mutation induced mitochondrial fragmentation. Our findings identify a novel gene causing mitochondrial myopathy, thereby expanding the spectrum of mitochondrial myopathies caused by nuclear genes. Our findings also suggest a role for CHCHD10 in the morphologic remodeling of the mitochondria.
    Neurogenetics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We performed an innovative systematic meta-analysis of 60 gene expression profiles of whole normal human brain, to provide a quantitative transcriptome reference map of it, i.e. a reference typical value of expression for each of the 39,250 known, mapped and 26,026 uncharacterized (unmapped) transcripts. To this aim, we used the software named Transcriptome Mapper (TRAM), which is able to generate transcriptome maps based on gene expression data from multiple sources. We also analyzed differential expression by comparing the brain transcriptome with those derived from human foetal brain gene expression, from a pool of human tissues (except the brain) and from the two normal human brain regions cerebellum and cerebral cortex, which are two of the main regions severely affected when cognitive impairment occurs, as happens in the case of trisomy 21. Data were downloaded from microarray databases, processed and analyzed using TRAM software and validated in vitro by assaying gene expression through several magnitude orders by 'real-time' reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The excellent agreement between in silico and experimental data suggested that our transcriptome maps may be a useful quantitative reference benchmark for gene expression studies related to the human brain. Furthermore, our analysis yielded biological insights about those genes which have an intrinsic over-/under-expression in the brain, in addition offering a basis for the regional analysis of gene expression. This could be useful for the study of chromosomal alterations associated to cognitive impairment, such as trisomy 21, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability.
    Neurogenetics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy are the two most common inherited optic neuropathies. The latter has been associated with mutations in the OPA1 and OPA3 genes. To date, only six families with OPA3-associated dominant optic atrophy have been reported. In order to identify additional families, we performed Sanger sequencing of the OPA3 gene in 75 unrelated optic neuropathy patients. Affected individuals from two families were found to harbour the c.313C > G, p.(Gln105Glu) change in heterozygous state; this genetic defect has been previously reported in four dominant optic atrophy families. Intra- and interfamilial variability in age of onset and presenting symptoms was observed. Although dominant OPA3 mutations are typically associated with optic atrophy and cataracts, the former can be observed in isolation; we report a case with no lens opacities at age 38. Conversely, it is important to consider OPA3-related disease in individuals with bilateral infantile-onset cataracts and to assess optic nerve health in those whose vision fail to improve following lens surgery. The papillomacular bundle is primarily affected and vision is typically worse than 20/40. Notably, we describe one subject who retained normal acuities into the fifth decade of life. The condition can be associated with extraocular clinical features: two affected individuals in the present study had sensorineural hearing loss. The clinical heterogeneity observed in the individuals reported here (all having the same genetic defect in OPA3) suggests that the molecular pathology of the disorder is likely to be complex.
    Neurogenetics 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aggressive behaviour is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Despite of moderate heritability estimates, progress in identifying the genetic factors underlying aggressive behaviour has been limited. There are currently three genetic mouse models of high and low aggression created using selective breeding. This is the first study to offer a global transcriptomic characterization of the prefrontal cortex across all three genetic mouse models of aggression. A systems biology approach has been applied to transcriptomic data across the three pairs of selected inbred mouse strains (Turku Aggressive (TA) and Turku Non-Aggressive (TNA), Short Attack Latency (SAL) and Long Attack Latency (LAL) mice and North Carolina Aggressive (NC900) and North Carolina Non-Aggressive (NC100)), providing novel insight into the neurobiological mechanisms and genetics underlying aggression. First, weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was performed to identify modules of highly correlated genes associated with aggression. Probe sets belonging to gene modules uncovered by WGCNA were carried forward for network analysis using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). The RankProd non-parametric algorithm was then used to statistically evaluate expression differences across the genes belonging to modules significantly associated with aggression. IPA uncovered two pathways, involving NF-kB and MAPKs. The secondary RankProd analysis yielded 14 differentially expressed genes, some of which have previously been implicated in pathways associated with aggressive behaviour, such as Adrbk2. The results highlighted plausible candidate genes and gene networks implicated in aggression-related behaviour.
    Neurogenetics 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and seriously disabling adult-onset neurological disease. Ninety percent of ALS patients are sporadic cases (sALS) with no clear genetic linkage. Accumulating evidence indicates that various microRNAs (miRNAs), expressed in a spatially and temporally controlled manner in the brain, play a key role in neuronal development. In addition, microRNA dysregulation contributes to some mental disorders and neurodegeneration diseases. In our research, the expression of one selected miRNA, miR-338-3p, which previously we have found over-expressed in blood leukocytes, was studied in several different tissues from sALS patients. For the first time, we detected a specific microRNA disease-related upregulation, miR-338-3p, in blood leukocytes as well in cerebrospinal fluid, serum, and spinal cord from sALS patients. Besides, staining of in situ hybridization showed that the signals of miR-338-3p were localized in the grey matter of spinal cord tissues from sALS autopsied patients. We propose that miRNA profiles found in tissue samples from sALS patients can be relevant to understand sALS pathogenesis and lead to set up effective biomarkers for sALS early diagnosis.
    Neurogenetics 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics, frequently associated with psychiatric co-morbidities. Despite the significant level of heritability, the genetic architecture of TS still remains elusive. Herein, we investigated an Italian family where an 8-year-old boy, his father, and paternal uncle have a diagnosis of TS. Array-CGH and high resolution SNP-array analyses revealed a heterozygous microdeletion of ∼135 kb at the 7q36.2 locus in the proband and his father. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses confirmed the presence of the alteration also in the paternal uncle. The deletion selectively involves the first exon of the DPP6 gene, leading to a down-regulation of its expression, as demonstrated by the reduced messenger RNA (mRNA) levels assessed by RT-qPCR. The DPP6 gene encodes for a type II membrane glycoprotein expressed predominantly in the central nervous system. To date, a de novo DPP6 exonic duplication, of uncertain significance, was reported in one patient with TS. Moreover, the DPP6 gene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and, notably, in haloperidol-induced dyskinesia. This first familial case provides evidence for association between DPP6 haploinsufficiency and TS, further suggesting a plausible molecular link between TS and ASD, and might shed some light on the efficacy and tolerability profiles of antidopaminergic agents used for tic management, thus prompting further studies on a larger cohort of patients.
    Neurogenetics 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Since identification of mutations in the ATM gene leading to ataxia-telangiectasia, enormous efforts have been devoted to discovering the roles this protein plays in DNA repair as well as other cellular functions. Even before the identification of ATM mutations, it was clear that other diseases with different genomic loci had very similar neurological symptoms. There has been significant progress in understanding why cancer and immunodeficiency occur in ataxia-telangiectasia even though many details remain to be determined, but the field is no closer to determining why the nervous system requires ATM and other DNA repair genes. Even though rodent disease models have similar DNA repair abnormalities as the human diseases, they have no consistent, robust neuropathological phenotype making it difficult to understand the neurological underpinnings of disease. Therefore, it may be useful to reassess the neurological and neuropathological characteristics of ataxia-telangiectasia in human patients to look for potential commonalities in DNA repair diseases that result in ataxia. In doing so, it is clear that ataxia-telangiectasia and similar diseases share neurological features other than merely ataxia, such as length-dependent motor and sensory neuropathies, and that the neuroanatomical localization for these symptoms is understood. Cells affected in ataxia-telangiectasia and similar diseases are some of the largest single nucleated cells in the body. In addition, a subset of these diseases also has extrapyramidal movements and oculomotor apraxia. These neurological and neuropathological similarities may indicate a common DNA repair related pathogenesis with very large cell size as a critical risk factor.
    Neurogenetics 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain (DYNC1H1) gene has been increasingly associated with neurodegenerative disorders including axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2), intellectual disability and malformations of cortical development. In addition, evidence from mouse models (Loa, catabolite repressor-activator (Cra) and Sprawling (Swl)) has shown that mutations in Dync1h1 cause a range of neurodegenerative phenotypes with motor and sensory neuron involvement. In this current study, we examined the possible contribution of other cytoplasmic dynein subunits that bind to DYNC1H1 as a cause of inherited peripheral neuropathy. We focused on screening the cytoplasmic dynein intermediate, light intermediate and light chain genes in a cohort of families with inherited peripheral neuropathies. Nine genes were screened and ten variants were detected, but none was identified as pathogenic, indicating that cytoplasmic dynein intermediate, light intermediate and light chains are not a cause of neuropathy in our cohort.
    Neurogenetics 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids is a neurodegenerative disease associated with mutations in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene (CSF1R). A 44-year-old woman with a 7-year history of depression presented with neurological signs and a recent cognitive decline. The diagnosis of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids was suspected based on the findings of a predominant frontal leukoencephalopathy and neuroaxonal spheroids on brain biopsy. She shares with her mother a novel CSF1R exon 18 missense mutation (c.2350G > A; p.V784M). The mother has a long-standing bipolar disorder and mild multifocal white matter abnormalities in her 70s. This is the first report of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids due to this novel CSF1R missense mutation. Our report suggests that either marked intrafamilial variability or incomplete penetrance can be associated with CSF1R mutations. The observation of a small bone cyst in our patient supports the hypothesis that hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids and polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy may belong to a spectrum of overlapping phenotypes.
    Neurogenetics 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Recessive mutations in genes of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor synthesis pathway have been demonstrated as causative of GPI deficiency disorders associated with intellectual disability, seizures, and diverse congenital anomalies. We performed whole exome sequencing in a patient with progressive encephalopathies and multiple dysmorphism with hypophosphatasia and identified novel compound heterozygous mutations, c.250G>T (p. Glu84*) and c.1342C>T (p. Arg488Trp), in PIGT encoding a subunit of the GPI transamidase complex. The surface expression of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) on patient granulocytes was lower than that of healthy controls. Transfection of the Arg488Trp mutant PIGT construct, but not the Glu84* mutant, into PIGT-deficient cells partially restored the expression of GPI-APs DAF and CD59. These results indicate that PIGT mutations caused neurological impairment and multiple congenital anomalies in this patient.
    Neurogenetics 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Gain-of-function mutations of alpha-synuclein (SNCA) are known to trigger Parkinson's disease (PD) with striatal dopaminergic deficits and a reduction of spontaneous movements. The longest size variant (allele 2) of the complex microsatellite repeat Rep1 within the SNCA gene promoter is known to confer a PD risk. We now observed this Rep1 allele 2 to show significantly decreased frequency in restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a genotyping study of 258 patients versus 235 healthy controls from Germany. Given that RLS is a disease with increased spontaneous movements and with increased striatal dopamine signaling, these novel data appear plausible. The scarcity of this alpha-synuclein gain-of-function variant in RLS might suggest that a low alpha-synuclein function via the SNARE complex in presynaptic vesicle release and neurotransmission of the striatum contributes to RLS pathogenesis.
    Neurogenetics 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: SYNJ1 has been recently identified by two independent groups as the gene defective in a novel form of autosomal recessive, early-onset atypical parkinsonism (PARK20). Two consanguineous families were initially reported (one of Sicilian and one of Iranian origins), with the same SYNJ1 homozygous mutation (c.773G > A, p.Arg258Gln) segregating with a similar phenotype of early-onset parkinsonism and additional atypical features. Here, we report the identification of the same SYNJ1 homozygous mutation in two affected siblings of a third pedigree. Both siblings had mild developmental psychomotor delay, followed, during the third decade of life, by progressive parkinsonism, dystonia, and mild cognitive impairment. One sibling suffered one episode of generalized seizures. Neuroimaging studies revealed severe nigrostriatal dopaminergic defects, mild striatal and very mild cortical hypometabolism. Treatment with dopamine agonists and anticholinergics resulted in partial improvements. Genetic analyses revealed in both siblings the SYNJ1 homozygous c.773G > A (p.Arg258Gln) mutation. Haplotype analysis suggests that the mutation has arisen independently in this family and the Sicilian PARK20 family previously described by us, in keeping with the hypothesis of a mutational hot spot. This is the third reported family with autosomal recessive, early-onset parkinsonism associated with the SYNJ1 p.Arg258Gln mutation. This work contributes to the definition of the genetic and clinical aspects of PARK20. This newly recognized form must be considered in the diagnostic work-up of patients with early-onset atypical parkinsonism. The presence of seizures might represent a red flag to suspect PARK20.
    Neurogenetics 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Recessive mutations in chromosome 10 open reading frame 2 (C10orf2) are relevant in infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA). In this study, we investigated the causative mutation in a Korean family with combined phenotypes of IOSCA, sensorimotor polyneuropathy, and myopathy. We investigated recessive mutations in a Korean family with two individuals affected by IOSCA. Causative mutations were investigated using whole exome sequencing. Electrophysiological analyses and muscle and nerve biopsies were performed, along with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and lower extremities. Compound heterozygous mutations c.1460C>T and c.1485-1G>A in C10orf2 were identified as causative of IOSCA. Skeletal muscle showed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. Both patients showed a period of normal development until 12-15 months, followed by ataxia, athetosis, hearing loss, and intellectual disability. Electrophysiological findings indicated motor and sensory polyneuropathies. Muscle biopsy revealed variations in the size and shape of myofibers with scattered, small, and angulated degenerating myofibers containing abnormal mitochondria; these observations are consistent with myopathy and may be the result of mtDNA deletions. Sural nerve biopsy revealed an axonal neuropathy. High-signal-intensity lesions in the middle cerebellar peduncles were correlated with clinical severity, and MRI of the lower legs was compatible with the hypothesis of length-dependent axonal degeneration. We identified novel compound heterozygous mutations of the C10orf2 gene as the cause of IOSCA with sensorimotor polyneuropathy and myopathy. Signs of motor neuropathy and myopathy were discovered for the first time in IOSCA patients with C10orf2 mutations. These results suggest that the clinical spectrum of IOSCA caused by C10orf2 mutations may be more variable than previously reported.
    Neurogenetics 05/2014;
  • Neurogenetics 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common demyelinating neurodegenerative disease with a strong genetic component. Previous studies have associated genetic variants in IL2RA and IL7R in the pathophysiology of the disease. In this study, we describe the association between IL2RA (rs2104286) and IL7R (rs6897932) in the Canadian population. Genotyping 1,978 MS patients and 830 controls failed to identify any significant association between these variants and disease risk. However, stratified analysis for family history of disease and disease course identified a trend towards association for IL2RA in patients without a family history (p = 0.05; odds ratio = 0.77) and a significant association between IL7R and patients who developed progressive MS (PrMS) (p = 0.002; odds ratio = 0.73). Although not statistically significant, the effect of IL2RA (rs2104286) in patients without a family history of MS indicates that the genetic components for familial and sporadic disease are perhaps distinct. This data suggests that the onset of sporadic disease is likely determined by a large number of variants of small effect, whereas MS in patients with a family history of disease is caused by a few deleterious variants. In addition, the significant association between PrMS and rs6897932 indicates that IL7R may not be disease-causing but a determinant of disease course. Further characterization of the effect of IL2RA and IL7R genetic variants in defined MS subtypes is warranted to evaluate the effect of these genes on specific clinical outcomes and to further elucidate the mechanisms of disease onset and progression.
    Neurogenetics 04/2014;
  • Neurogenetics 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We report a 54-year-old man who was admitted to the hospital because of acute neurological symptoms due to a cerebral haemorrhage. Postmortem brain examination revealed a lobar haemorrhage and advanced AD neuropathologic changes associated with severe cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Genetic study evidenced the presence of a large APP locus duplication (APPdup) in the patient and a PSEN1 p.E318G polymorphism in him and his older asymptomatic sibling. The APPdup spanned 14.5 Mb and blocks of segmental duplications were detected in the breakpoints. We propose the replication-based mechanism of Fork Stalling Template Switching (FoSTeS) to explain this APPdup rearrangement.
    Neurogenetics 04/2014;
  • Neurogenetics 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: During cell stress, the transcription and translation of immediate early genes are prioritized, while most other messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are stored away in stress granules or degraded in processing bodies (P-bodies). TIA-1 is an mRNA-binding protein that needs to translocate from the nucleus to seed the formation of stress granules in the cytoplasm. Because other stress granule components such as TDP-43, FUS, ATXN2, SMN, MAPT, HNRNPA2B1, and HNRNPA1 are crucial for the motor neuron diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)/spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and for the frontotemporal dementia (FTD), here we studied mouse nervous tissue to identify mRNAs with selective dependence on Tia1 deletion. Transcriptome profiling with oligonucleotide microarrays in comparison of spinal cord and cerebellum, together with independent validation in quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and immunoblots demonstrated several strong and consistent dysregulations. In agreement with previously reported TIA1 knock down effects, cell cycle and apoptosis regulators were affected markedly with expression changes up to +2-fold, exhibiting increased levels for Cdkn1a, Ccnf, and Tprkb vs. decreased levels for Bid and Inca1 transcripts. Novel and surprisingly strong expression alterations were detected for fat storage and membrane trafficking factors, with prominent +3-fold upregulations of Plin4, Wdfy1, Tbc1d24, and Pnpla2 vs. a -2.4-fold downregulation of Cntn4 transcript, encoding an axonal membrane adhesion factor with established haploinsufficiency. In comparison, subtle effects on the RNA processing machinery included up to 1.2-fold upregulations of Dcp1b and Tial1. The effect on lipid dynamics factors is noteworthy, since also the gene deletion of Tardbp (encoding TDP-43) and Atxn2 led to fat metabolism phenotypes in mouse. In conclusion, genetic ablation of the stress granule nucleator TIA-1 has a novel major effect on mRNAs encoding lipid homeostasis factors in the brain, similar to the fasting effect.
    Neurogenetics 03/2014;

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