European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling (Eur J Psychother Counsell Health )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

The European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counselling & Health is a peer reviewed publication which aims to stimulate and inform debate and provide linkages throughout Europe within the expanding field of psychotherapy and counselling as a means to health. The journal raises important questions in terms of European practice, theory and research for psychotherapy and counselling practitioners, related professions, students and academics. The focus of the journal includes the following areas: the contributions from and debates between different European theoretical approaches to psychotherapy, counselling and health, and their respective traditions of practice and research the implications of individual and group psychotherapy and counselling for European health professionals in public, private and voluntary settings the managerial and training/education issues that arise from the increasing provision of psychotherapy and counselling in European health care settings the interaction between the psychological and the physical and the status of these categories. Dealing with key current, practical and theoretical issues, the journal is essential reading for informed practitioners across disciplines and geographic boundaries, who need a greater understanding of developments in psychotherapy and counselling in Europe. Key coverage: Clinical comment on practice - moving important issues to the forefront of discussion Broad ranging theoretical perspectives - providing contrasting, informed debate on a wide range of subjects Current research developments - ensuring that new information is brought to attention quickly and clearly International topics - bringing together European research interests New publications - highlighting and reviewing books of particular importance in this fast expanding field.

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
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  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
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  • Article influence
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  • Website
    European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counselling & Health website
  • Other titles
    European journal of psychotherapy, counselling, and health (Online)
  • ISSN
    1364-2537
  • OCLC
    45689948
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present naturalistic study was to explore the effectiveness of psychodynamic child psychotherapy in routine practice. The sample comprised 207 psychotherapies with children 4–12 years of age with a broad range of mental health problems. Data on two measures, children’s global assessment scale (CGAS) and strength and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ), were collected pre-post therapy. Within-group changes were analysed using repeated measures mixed-models ANOVA. Individual changes were examined by means of clinical significance. The analyses revealed improvement in general functioning, decrease in problem severity and problem impact on the child’s everyday life, as well as an increase in prosocial behaviour. For CGAS, an interaction effect was discovered suggesting a larger improvement for younger children (4–6 years) than for older children (10–12 years). After therapy, 38% (n 76) achieved clinically significant improvement. Time-limited psychotherapy proved favourable for children assigned to that particular treatment modality. The study generated similar results as previous well-controlled trials, revealing statistically significant results in a large sample and in spite the use of non-specific outcome measures. The study provides everyday evidence to the effectiveness of child psychodynamic treatment with parallel parental work for a broad range of child mental health problems.
    European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 07/2014; 16(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present article examines ways to integrate two, often contradictory, types of knowledge in supervision, which are sometimes represented either by supervisors or supervisees, and sometimes by different parts in the supervisee. These types of knowledge are in a dialectic relationship: they may define each other and at the same time influence and shape each other, yet remain two separate sources for understanding the therapeutic experience. One type is the primary, vague, and intuitive knowledge about patients and therapist–patient interactions, derived from actual participation in the therapeutic relationship. The other type is knowledge derived from theory, experience acquired mainly outside of the specific therapy, and dialog with colleagues.
    European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 07/2014; 16(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper issues related to adult learning, such as self-directed and experiential learning are shown to hold a trace of the unknown, which has implications for psychotherapy training and practice. The unknown is traced through the problematic of individualistic approaches that restrict the emergence of unknowns by limiting possibility of the other, hindering recognition of our own cultural position and seeking to avoid anxiety. Learning is also shown to have links with experiences of change and loss, having in common the generation of anxiety, seen as both the driving force to know and the need to close down unknowing. Subsequently, learning is viewed as involving the potential to repeat the already known as well as opening up the possibility for something new. Psychoanalysis and continental philosophy are shown, in different ways, to help our understanding of the reasons for the anxiety occurring in times of transition, also showing the way fragmentary experiences act as a reminder of death. It is proposed that the relational aspects of learning are an important factor in learning to tolerate the anxiety and adult learning is thus seen as requiring possibility of the other, in relationship, in order to permit the unknown.
    European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 07/2014; 16(3).
  • European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 07/2014; 16(3).
  • European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 07/2014; 16(3).
  • European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 07/2014; 16(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The National Institute for Clinical Excellence in the UK published its guideline on the treatment of children and adolescents who have been diagnosed with depression in 2005. Although the guideline has not been updated since, it is widely used in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services in England and Wales to advocate that all children and young people who have been diagnosed with depression should have access to individual cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) through the Children and Adolescent Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (CYP-IAPT) project. This article critically reviews the guideline in terms of the evidence that NICE cites for the efficacy of individual CBT. In particular, it provides a meta-review of four randomised control trials where the effectiveness of individual CBT was compared to another psychological therapy intervention, a non-specific control intervention and/or a wait-list. Each trial is considered separately, before looking at the overall evidence that they provide when the findings are considered as a whole. A trial comparing individual CBT to a non-psychological intervention (medication) is discussed separately. This review found that on present evidence, individual CBT cannot be viewed as evidence-based psychological therapy for children and young people who have been diagnosed with depression.
    European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 07/2014; 16(3).
  • European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 01/2014; 16(1).
  • European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 01/2014; 16(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The author proposes that it has largely been underestimated that the therapeutic community is placed within two discourses – that of therapy and that of community – and has almost exclusively focused on the first. In so doing, it has been restricted within a medical or pseudo-medical conceptual framework. In an appeal to re-frame the discussion about the therapeutic community in relation to its forgotten discourse reference is principally made to the work of the French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan and to two of his sources – Heidegger and Socrates – and more specifically to Lacan’s notion of lack which is contrasted to modernity’s trope of expectation which corresponds to the Imaginary phallus.
    European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 01/2014; 16(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The author, following constructivist psychoanalysis, observes a dialectic at work in the therapeutic community between knowledge and authority of the analyst and his/her spontaneity on the one hand, and between the formal and informal roles that therapists adopt in a therapeutic community on the other hand. The key to successful therapy, he suggests, lies in maintaining this dialectic. He then goes on to discuss the function of staff teams in therapeutic communities and the importance of taking into account the patients’ unconscious representations of the team. He stresses the need for leadership in therapeutic communities and in engaging with moral issues and not just clinical ones.
    European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 01/2014; 16(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper the author reflects on research undertaken by the Association Myth and Reality in the context of the psychiatric reforms in Italy which resulted in the closure of the asylums and the organisation, over the last 20 years, of a network of services in the community. These include thousands of residential units operating on a rehabilitative model. The focus of this paper is on the concept of the therapeutic community as a dynamic evolutionary path, individually tailored to people with different diagnoses and different ages – e.g. psychosis; borderline; adolescents and children. The therapeutic – and more specifically the environmental – factors are presented here. This includes the aesthetics of living and the sensory/emotional climate in relation to the care of the self and protection, regulation and safety, transitional playful climate, everyday life and the sharing implicit in relationships. The emotional climate is a fundamental component that transverses and intersects all the other factors. Treatment is central to the group with its potential for containment and dynamism in relation to relationships, cohesion, belonging, integration of the self in the community and connections with social networks outside the group aimed at reintegration into society of the resident as a citizen. A system of evaluation through peer reviews between therapeutic communities in Italy is being built in order to continuously improve the quality of service delivery.
    European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 01/2014; 16(1).
  • European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 01/2014; 16(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Successfully facilitating learning for small therapy training programmes requires a special understanding of the psychological work of group processes. Students in therapy training spend almost every class together over two or more years. In these student groups, or cohorts, individuals manage themselves within a unique interpersonal and intragroup dynamic. Course instructors must develop their capacity to work effectively with this specific learning milieu. At the same time, the particular dynamics of the cohort context might not be understood by university management where increasingly few cohort contexts exist for students. Consequently, phenomena arising from the specialised nature of the group environment may not be well understood outside of the expertise of the course. In the first part of the paper, the international literature about learning in cohorts is reviewed. In the second part, this reflection is further developed to explore facilitation of a group that has some features of what might be described as negative cohesiveness, or what is described in family theory as enmeshment. Some consideration as to how to anticipate and off-set potential difficulties for groups in therapy training courses is also contributed.
    European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 01/2014; 16(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Romão de Sousa Foundation has worked for three years to establish Casa de Alba which aims to help individuals and families affected by mental health problems. Working within a relational-integrative framework, Casa de Alba has a multidisciplinary team which makes use of therapeutic community theory and a range of psychological therapies and psychosocial interventions including individual and group psychotherapy, occupational therapy, arts, yoga, psychiatric consultation and pharmacotherapy, as well as the encouragement of self-management in everyday activities within the house. The use of over 20 acres of outdoor space will form part of the day to day therapeutic programme with activities such as horticultural therapy, ridding, walking and sports. Supervision will be used to help the staff team integrate different modalities and approaches as well as to improve the service.
    European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 01/2014; 16(1).
  • European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 01/2014; 16(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The work of therapeutic communities (TCs) have been said to develop from a certain ‘impulse’ or ‘attitude of mind’. The origin and definitional function of these terms are briefly traced and their meaning explored. Subsequently, eight papers submitted to the Journal are reviewed in order to give a survey picture of the theoretical and practical concerns current within European TCs. This brief survey demonstrates that, while rooted in the TC tradition, a number of projects have made interesting developments in both practice and theory. These innovations and the flare which has gone into them can be taken as evidence that the TC impulse is alive and well. What TCs require now are wider and more effective means of transmission to others because at their best TCs are self-regulating systems which can potentially obviate the harm caused by the deregulating systems of traditional health and social care.
    European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 01/2014; 16(1).
  • European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling 01/2014; 16(1).