School Leadership and Management (Sch Leader Manag )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

School Leadership & Management is a well-established international journal that publishes articles, reports, news and information on all aspects of the organisation and management of schools and colleges. The journal is fundamentally concerned with the improvement of practice and so contributions from practitioners are particularly welcome provided that the relationship between theory and practice is made explicit. Contributors are encouraged to make use of original documents, schedules and developmental material if this would be of interest to other practitioners. Areas of coverage include: staff appraisal and development; management effectiveness; modular curriculum, schools-industry/external linkages; policy-making and implementation; organisational development; improving performance; leadership, team-building and effective delegation; management of time and tasks; monitoring and review activities; management information systems; marketing; reorganisation and the management of effective change.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    School Leadership & Management website
  • Other titles
    School leadership & management (Online), School leadership and management
  • ISSN
    1363-2434
  • OCLC
    37927773
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article considers a secondary science department that has, since 2000, developed distributed leadership as a form of human capacity building. Using a longitudinal ethnographic case study allowed us to consider how distributed leadership can be nurtured and developed in a department. Our analysis centres on two key issues: the nature and pattern of distributed leadership practices and the continuity that provides coherence to those practices. From our analysis, there appear to be two major conclusions. The first of these is the need for administrators to be purposeful in the appointments that they make to formal leadership positions. To enact distributed leadership practices requires leaders who can exercise both formal power and influence. The second conclusion relates to the time required for continuity of leadership practices to give rise to changes that lead to teachers managing the teaching and learning programme.
    School Leadership and Management 05/2014; 34(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article presents findings from a study of five head teachers who were responsible for the management of serious teacher misbehaviour (TMB) in England. In cases that included the downloading of extreme pornography on a school laptop and a sexual relationship with a pupil, the multiple impacts of TMB were potentially devastating to the well-being of pupils, staff and the reputation of the schools. The article highlights a number of strategies for managing serious TMB considered best practice by the head teachers as well as discussing other, more nuanced issues that accompany such cases including trust relations, the influence of gender and the difficulty of simultaneous immersion and detachment required of head teachers to effectively manage such cases.
    School Leadership and Management 05/2014; 34(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: School leadership has been well researched in developed countries. However, in Asia, particularly in Indonesia, school leadership has not been well explored. Using survey data from a sample of 475 teachers in six Lampung school districts, this paper examines the relationships between school principal leadership styles and school principal decision-making styles in an Indonesian school context. Findings are that most of the relationships between school principal leadership styles and school principal decision-making styles are significant. These findings suggest that teachers perceive that principals should exhibit much more transformational leadership style and rational decision-making style but avoid laissez-faire leadership style and avoidant decision-making style.
    School Leadership and Management 05/2014; 34(3).
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, the author explores the development of school staff who are employed to support pupils in the classroom, specifically the teaching assistant/higher level teaching assistant role. These roles have undergone considerable change following the introduction of Workforce Reform and Remodelling in English schools and the National Agreement. In practice, the introduction of this agreement into schools appears to have a powerful gendered aspect which limits choice and agency for individuals and prevents the development of a coherent workforce. I argue that the discourse of maternality within which the school support role has evolved supposes a level of self-sacrifice and conscientiousness which is gendered and conceals the exploitative nature of the role in terms of poor pay and career prospects. Furthermore, the growth of support staff in English schools to undertake roles previously assigned to teachers has had the effect of disaggregating and de-professionalising the teacher role and weakening the traditional job boundaries which defined the work of support staff.
    School Leadership and Management 05/2014; 34(3).
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    ABSTRACT: This article argues that although there are increasing similarities in priorities across different national education systems, contextual differences raise questions about the replication of sets of change strategies based on particular understandings of the nature of educational change across these different systems. This article begins with an overview of some of the dominant constructions of the management of change in the literature, particularly from Western economically developed democracies. It then outlines the Pakistani educational system to highlight some of the issues raised by the application of these change policies and models to a developing country. This article draws from a research study which explored the views and experiences of school leaders and teachers with regard to the management of a large-scale reform programme at the higher secondary level in Pakistan. The findings of this study illustrate the way in which there is a dissonance between the culture and practices of a specific national educational system and the assumptions embedded in the sets of reform strategies that have been imported from other systems. This article concludes by exploring how change management processes can be reconceptualised in order to be sensitive to the context of education in a developing country.
    School Leadership and Management 05/2014; 34(3).
  • School Leadership and Management 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Driven by the country's need to compete in a global economy, the UK government is imposing rapid and relentless educational change on schools. School leaders face the challenge of managing the impact of externally driven change and supporting others' resilience while frequently paying scant attention to their own. Six semi-structured interviews with headteachers and a review of the literature provide an insight into complex relationships which underpin school leaders' emotional resilience. A model is proposed which suggests where attention should be focused to strengthen resilience. Recommendations are made affecting headteachers, school governors, authors of leadership development materials and government policy-makers.
    School Leadership and Management 01/2014; 34(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Educational partnerships with area-based approaches comprise an increasingly well-grounded and internationally extended strategy for equitable improvement. However, literature shows a lack of focused inquiry on the assessment of these educational collaborative programmes. This article aims to develop and validate an instrument to assess these types of programmes across countries. Two successful programmes were assessed in Spain and the USA in order to test the validity of the measurement model. Results confirm that the model provides a valid tool to assess the effectiveness of collaborative performance, helping school principals, district leaders and policy-makers to enact evidence-based decision-making.
    School Leadership and Management 01/2014; 34(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In England, governing bodies continue to be responsible for the conduct of publicly funded schools. This article compares the governing of publicly funded primary schools (for 5–11 year olds) and secondary schools (for 11–18 year olds). The research analysed policy documents and the governing of 16 primary and 14 secondary schools. The main governance mode for both primary schools and secondary schools is hierarchical and similar in nature, and the governing bodies of primary and secondary schools use broadly similar governing instruments. However, they differ in significant ways. In primary schools, governing is smaller in scale and less complex. Primary school governing is closer to the school and children, and the images held by governors of the system to be governed are better developed in primary schools. Functional knowledge was more useful in primary school governing, and the use of informal meetings as instruments of governance was more widespread in primary school governing. The findings and their implications need to be taken into account in the analysis of and policy making for school governing.
    School Leadership and Management 01/2014; 34(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recent changes in the English education system have resulted in the September 2012 Inspection framework. To a far greater extent than its predecessors this schedule looks to create a stronger relationship between the inspection agency Ofsted (Office for Standards in Education), and to extend the agency's already substantial reach and influence into the areas of teacher professional development and pupil attainment. An explicitly far tougher framework, the 2012 schedule places far greater emphasis on teaching and learning and on lesson observation as a means of judging teacher effectiveness and pupil attainment whilst concomitantly aiming to enhance the credibility of both judgements and agency by creating an enhanced professional relationship between inspectors and school staff. Drawing on Clarke's theoretical framework of performance paradoxes in public service inspection, this paper argues that in attempting to address concerns over the agencies' independence, the 2012 Inspection Framework and concomitant re-modelling of the inspection workforce serve rather to compound them. The paper concludes that this combined with profound changes in the English educational landscape presents problems for the agency which may in the longer term prove intractable.
    School Leadership and Management 01/2014; 34(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Most schools currently employ three generations of teachers and leaders: Baby Boomers (1946–65), Generation X (1966–80) and Generation Y (1981–2003). However, the implications for school leaders of multi-generational schools remain relatively unexplored. This paper examines the empirical multi-disciplinary generations at work evidence to identify differences and similarities in how generational cohorts approach work/life balance, authority, collaboration and careers. The paper defines generational characteristics and introduces the review methods employed. The findings are organised within three important leadership actions: stimulating professional growth and capacity, building collaborative cultures, and establishing work conditions. The conclusion presents future research directions.
    School Leadership and Management 01/2014; 34(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A growing number of organisations – universities, non-profits, independent consultants – are emerging as partners to school systems pursuing systemic improvement. This proliferation invites questions probing the interaction between school systems and their consulting partners. Drawing on a cross-disciplinary review of literature, this theoretical paper (1) explores the processes and strategies used by consulting organisations as partners to school systems and (2) proposes a conceptual framework as a starting point for implementation and evaluation of effective consulting for systemic improvement.
    School Leadership and Management 01/2014; 34(2).
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    ABSTRACT: An exploratory study of two grammar schools in the South East of England is used to justify and demonstrate a self-assessed approach that investigates trait emotional intelligence (EI) among school leaders. First, the theoretical underpinnings of ability and trait EI approaches are critically compared based on recent relevant literature. Then the results from TEIQue-SF, a self-evaluation questionnaire, are presented and discussed. Finally, notwithstanding limitations of the study and the approach taken, we suggest that with further empirical research, a refined and usable self-assessed approach could be a useful way for practitioners to evaluate trait EI among school leaders in the future.
    School Leadership and Management 01/2014; 34(2):201-222.
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    ABSTRACT: Gratitude was an important missing factor in the extant relationship quality and relationship loyalty model. We introduced gratitude into the model of relationship quality and relationship loyalty. Two hundred and eighteen teachers from elementary schools in Taiwan were used to conduct an empirical research. The results show that teachers' gratitude has positive direct effects on teachers' trust, satisfaction and commitment. Teachers' trust has no significant effect on behavioural loyalty but has a significant effect on attitudinal loyalty. However, teachers' satisfaction has no significant effect on attitudinal loyalty but has a significant effect on behavioural loyalty. Teachers' commitment has a significant effect on behavioural and attitudinal loyalty. The mediating role of commitment implies that it (1) partially mediates the relationship between teachers' trust and attitudinal loyalty, and fully mediates the relationship between teachers' trust and behavioural loyalty; (2) partially mediates the relationship between teachers' satisfaction and behavioural loyalty, and fully mediates the relationship between teachers' trust and attitudinal loyalty.
    School Leadership and Management 01/2014; 34(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There are in excess of 5000 English-medium international schools worldwide. This article reports a study of the governing of such schools that explored in particular the implications of ownership and profit motive. The research entailed a questionnaire-based survey of international school head teachers and interviews with representatives of accrediting organisations, owners and head teachers of international schools. Governors in all settings found maintaining a strategic as opposed to an operational role difficult. The distinction between privately owned for-profit and not-for-profit categories of international schools could be unclear. It could change over time and private owners may gain financially personally in not-for-profit institutional settings. Head teachers in privately owned schools, even those schools operated for financial profit, viewed the governing arrangements positively, perhaps because they often had considerable autonomy over educational matters even though they may be excluded from the governing of financial/resource matters. This arrangement has implications for the governing model. Governing bodies of community-owned schools, which in the sample were all not-for-profit, were typically fully elected or self-perpetuating or a hybrid of the two. Fully elected boards, especially fully elected parent boards, and fully self-perpetuating boards can be problematic and the hybrid model has distinct advantages.
    School Leadership and Management 01/2014; 34(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The issue of emotions in school leadership is one that has received increasing attention in recent years. In this paper we present a case study of the emotional demands upon one principal as she undertakes a programme of school reform. This case study works against the common discourse of ‘emotional maturity’ inherent in an individual that is prevalent in leadership standards and literatures and shows how this principal's emotional work is constructed within the political frameworks of schools. This principal was both normalised into traditional ways of being a school principal and also sought to resist such normalisations. This paper provides an important contribution to understanding the ways that women leaders are negotiating the emotional terrain of enacting change and reform in their schools.
    School Leadership and Management 01/2014; 34(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper explores teachers' perspectives on the management of mandated educational change in order to understand how it may be managed more effectively. A case study of teachers' responses to the introduction of a quality teaching initiative in two New South Wales schools found that while some teachers described the strong negative impact of this externally initiated approach, others had taken charge of the required change and worked creatively with it. This suggests that it is possible for mandated change to be managed in positive ways, and an alternative approach is explored. Implications for governments, schools and teachers are discussed.
    School Leadership and Management 01/2014; 34(1):39-51.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: School leadership, head teacher professional development and school management practices in sub-Saharan Africa have varied little from the model of schooling established during colonial rule. Leadership for Learning (LfL) is a programme of school leadership developed at the University of Cambridge over a period of 10 years in conjunction with an international group of researchers and practitioners. This paper reports the results from questionnaire data gathered from a cohort of 125 head teachers who participated in the LfL programme in Ghana between 2009 and 2011, and speculates on the successes and barriers to leadership and learning. Implications arising from the scaling up of the LfL programme to include all Ghanaian schools are discussed.
    School Leadership and Management 01/2014; 34(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Educational partnerships with area-based approaches comprise an increasingly well- grounded and internationally extended strategy for equitable improvement. However, literature shows a lack of focused inquiry on the assessment of these educational collaborative programmes. This article aims to develop and validate an instrument to assess these types of programmes across countries. Two successful programmes were assessed in Spain and the USA in order to test the validity of the measurement model. Results confirm that the model provides a valid tool to assess the effectiveness of collaborative performance, helping school principals, district leaders and policy- makers to enact evidence-based decision-making. Keywords: educational collaborative networks; educational leadership; social capital; innovation; collaborative culture
    School Leadership and Management 12/2013;

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