Brain Injury Journal Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: International Association for the Study of Traumatic Brain Injury; European Brain Injury Society, Informa Healthcare

Journal description

This journal covers all aspects of brain injury from basic science, neurological techniques and outcomes to vocational aspects, with studies of rehabilitation and outcome of both patients and their families. It addresses both adult and pediatric issues and it embraces issues such as family and peer relationships, effects of alcohol and drugs, communication problems and management techniques and creating new programs. Brain Injury uses case studies to illustrate different approaches to a subject, and provides a forum for the appraisal of theories which may influence future research. Brain Injury is the official journal of the International Brain Injury Association (IBIA) and the European Brain Injury Society (EBIS).

Current impact factor: 1.86

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 1.861
2012 Impact Factor 1.513
2011 Impact Factor 1.36
2010 Impact Factor 1.75
2009 Impact Factor 1.533
2008 Impact Factor 1.116
2007 Impact Factor 1.25
2006 Impact Factor 1.182
2005 Impact Factor 1.471
2004 Impact Factor 1.136
2003 Impact Factor 1.12
2002 Impact Factor 1.043
2001 Impact Factor 0.924
2000 Impact Factor 0.914
1999 Impact Factor 1.017
1998 Impact Factor 1.085
1997 Impact Factor 1.256
1996 Impact Factor 0.843
1995 Impact Factor 0.88

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.06
Cited half-life 7.50
Immediacy index 0.38
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.55
Website Brain Injury website
Other titles Brain injury (Online), BI
ISSN 1362-301X
OCLC 38266063
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Informa Healthcare

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • On author's personal website or institution website
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • On a non-profit server
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • NIH funded authors may post articles to PubMed Central for release 12 months after publication
    • Wellcome Trust authors may deposit in Europe PMC after 6 months
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • Brain Injury 08/2015; DOI:10.3109/02699052.2015.1063694
  • Brain Injury 08/2015;
  • Brain Injury 08/2015; DOI:10.3109/02699052.2015.1055302
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    ABSTRACT: This study describes the case of a 57 year old gentleman with a previous severe brain injury who developed a severe psychotic disorder 19 years after the injury. This appears to have been precipitated by heavy psychedelic substance use, including cannabis, salvia divinorum, ketamine, LSD, cocaine and DMT amongst others. The psychosis remained in the absence of drug intoxication and was associated with prominent apathy, lack of concern and abulia. This study discusses the heavy psychedelic substance misuse possibly potentiating a transition to psychosis in this individual. Little work has been undertaken in this area as substance misuse has traditionally been an exclusion criteria for investigating psychosis in this patient group. It is suggested that psychedelic substance misuse should be investigated as a risk factor for psychotic illness in patients with brain injury, as this case clearly suggests.
    Brain Injury 08/2015; DOI:10.3109/02699052.2015.1046491
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    ABSTRACT: The goal of this investigation is to examine the prevalence of poor subjective sleep in patients with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and examine the relationship between subjective sleep quality and postconcussive symptoms (PCS), above and beyond the typical demographic and psychological distress variables. Individuals with a history of mTBI completed online questionnaires. Regression analysis was utilized to determine if subjective sleep quality would predict PCS severity, above and beyond demographic variables and psychological distress. Individuals with a history of mTBI (n = 158) completed surveys online. Sleep quality was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and PCS with the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI). Demographic information was collected and psychological distress was measured using the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18). In this sample, 92% of patients with mTBI reported poor sleep. Sleep quality significantly accounted for the variance in PCS, above and beyond demographics, time since injury and psychological distress (p < 0.001), although only a small amount of the variance in PCS was explained. Results indicate that poor subjective sleep quality is a significant problem in those with mTBI. While sleep is associated with PCS severity, psychological distress is a more potent predictor.
    Brain Injury 08/2015; DOI:10.3109/02699052.2015.1045030
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    ABSTRACT: This study assessed pilot feasibility and validity of a mobile health (mHealth) system for tracking mood-related symptoms after traumatic brain injury (TBI). A prospective, repeated measures design was used to assess compliance with daily ecological momentary assessments (EMA) conducted via a smartphone application over an 8-week period. An mHealth system was developed specifically for individuals with TBI and utilized previously validated tools for depressive and anxiety symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7). Feasibility was assessed in 20 community-dwelling adults with TBI via an assessment of compliance, satisfaction and usability of the smartphone applications. The authors also developed and implemented a clinical patient safety management mechanism for those endorsing suicidality. Participants correctly completed 73.4% of all scheduled assessments, demonstrating good compliance. Daily assessments took <2 minutes to complete. Participants reported high satisfaction with smartphone applications (6.3 of 7) and found them easy to use (6.2 of 7). Comparison of assessments obtained via telephone-based interview and EMA demonstrated high correlations (r = 0.81-0.97), supporting the validity of conducting these assessments via smartphone application in this population. EMA conducted via smartphone demonstrates initial feasibility among adults with TBI and presents numerous opportunities for long-term monitoring of mood-related symptoms in real-world settings.
    Brain Injury 08/2015; DOI:10.3109/02699052.2015.1045031
  • Brain Injury 08/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the relationship between disability, length of stay (LOS) and anticholinergic burden (ACB) with people following acquired brain or spinal cord injury. A retrospective case note review assessed total rehabilitation unit admission. Assessment of 52 consecutive patients with acquired brain/spinal injury and neuropathy in an in-patient neuro-rehabilitation unit of a UK university hospital. Data analysed included: Northwick Park Dependency Score (NPDS), Rehabilitation complexity Scale (RCS), Functional Independence Measure and Functional Assessment Measure FIM-FAM (UK version 2.2), LOS and ACB. Outcome was different in RCS, NPDS and FIM-FAM between admission and discharge. A positive change was reported in ACB results in a positive change in NPDS, with no significant effect on FIM-FAM, either Motor or Cognitive, or on the RCS. Change in ACB correlated to the length of hospital stay (regression correlation = -6.64; SE = 3.89). There was a significant harmful impact of increase in ACB score during hospital stay, from low to high ACB on NPDS (OR = 9.65; 95% CI = 1.36-68.64) and FIM-FAM Total scores (OR = 0.03; 95% CI = 0.002-0.35). There was a statistically significant correlation of ACB and neuro-disability measures and LOS amongst this patient cohort.
    Brain Injury 08/2015; DOI:10.3109/02699052.2015.1060358
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    ABSTRACT: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in paediatric patients after the first year of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of locally administered allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), in the acute period after a TBI. MSC were isolated from peritoneal fat of healthy rats, expanded in vitro and labelled with the green fluorescent protein. Rats were placed in one of three experimental groups: (1) Control: TBI, (2) IP-Control: TBI + local saline and (3) IP-Treat: TBI + 2 × 10(5) MSC 24 hours after receiving a moderate, unilateral, controlled cortical impact. Motor and cognitive behavioural tests were performed to evaluate functional recovery. Histological examination and immunohistochemistry were used to identify cell distribution. Improved performance was found on motor tests in the MSC-treated group compared to control groups. MSC were found in the perilesional area and their number decreased with time after transplantation. MSC treatment increased the cell density in the hippocampus (CA3 pyramidal cells and granule cells in the dentate gyrus) and enhanced neurogenesis in this area. MSC cell therapy resulted in better recovery of motor function compared with the control group. This cellular therapy might be considered for patients suffering from TBI.
    Brain Injury 08/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in paediatric patients after the first year of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of locally administered allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), in the acute period after a TBI. Methodology: MSC were isolated from peritoneal fat of healthy rats, expanded in vitro and labelled with the green fluorescent protein. Rats were placed in one of three experimental groups: (1) Control: TBI, (2) IP-Control: TBI + local saline and (3) IP-Treat: TBI + 2 × 105 MSC 24 hours after receiving a moderate, unilateral, controlled cortical impact. Motor and cognitive behavioural tests were performed to evaluate functional recovery. Histological examination and immunohistochemistry were used to identify cell distribution. Main results: Improved performance was found on motor tests in the MSC-treated group compared to control groups. MSC were found in the perilesional area and their number decreased with time after transplantation. MSC treatment increased the cell density in the hippocampus (CA3 pyramidal cells and granule cells in the dentate gyrus) and enhanced neurogenesis in this area. Conclusion: MSC cell therapy resulted in better recovery of motor function compared with the control group. This cellular therapy might be considered for patients suffering from TBI.
    Brain Injury 08/2015; DOI:10.3109/02699052.2015.1053525
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    ABSTRACT: Hyperglycaemia-induced progression of brain and erythrocyte oxidative injuries might be modulated by melatonin and selenium as potent antioxidants. The present study was conducted to explore whether melatonin and selenium protect against diabetic brain and erythrocyte oxidative stress levels in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Seventy rats were equally divided into seven groups. The first and second groups were used as untreated and placebo treated controls. The third group was treated with STZ to induce diabetes. The fourth and sixth groups received 10 mg kg(-1) melatonin. The fifth and seventh groups were treated with 1.5 mg kg(-1) selenium (sodium selenite). The sixth and seventh groups were treated with STZ administered with melatonin and selenium as described for the fourth and fifth groups. Brain and erythrocyte lipid peroxidation levels and plasma IL-1β and IL-4 levels were high in the STZ group, although they were low in melatonin and selenium treatments. Decreased glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, total antioxidant status, vitamins A and vitamin E values in brain and erythrocyte of STZ group were increased by melatonin and selenium treatments. Melatonin and selenium induced protective effects against diabetes-induced brain and erythrocyte oxidative injuries through regulation of the antioxidant level and cytokine production.
    Brain Injury 08/2015; DOI:10.3109/02699052.2015.1053526
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate if metacognitive strategy instruction (MSI) improves the receptive language skills of adults with cognitive-communication disorders secondary to acquired brain injury (ABI). An ABA intervention programme was implemented with eight adults with ABI, aged 25-70 years. The Measure of Cognitive-Linguistic Abilities (MCLA) was administered at baseline and following treatment. The treatment employed in this study involved three components: individual goal-based therapy, group remediation therapy using self-instruction and home practice. No receptive language sub-tests of the MCLA reached statistical significance. However, participants' raw score improvements in receptive language sub-tests indicated that MSI may be effective at remediating CCDs following ABI. Preliminary findings indicate that MSI may be effective in improving receptive language skills in adults with CCDs following ABI. Further research involving a more rigorous study, a larger sample size and a more reliable outcome measure is necessary and may provide statistically significant evidence for the effectiveness of MSI for remediating receptive language disorders.
    Brain Injury 07/2015; DOI:10.3109/02699052.2015.1043343
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate objectively and quantitatively human pupillary responses to a light stimulus under photopic conditions in individuals with non-blast-induced, chronic, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Seventeen individuals with chronic, non-blast-induced mTBI and 15 visually-normal (VN) controls were tested (aged 21-45 years). Pupillary responsivity to a brief step-input light stimulus was assessed objectively in each eye for 5 seconds using the Neuroptics PLR-200 monocular, hand-held pupillometer with its pre-set and automated eight parameter analysis. Five of the eight parameters assessed were significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.05) in the mTBI group as compared to the VN control group: maximum (or peak) constriction velocity, average constriction velocity, average dilation velocity, maximum diameter and amplitude of constriction. The remaining three parameters were similar in each group (p > 0.05): constriction latency, 75% dilation recovery time and minimum diameter. The slowed dilation dynamics and reduced maximum pupillary diameter in mTBI suggest deficiency primarily of the sympathetic control system. The reduced peak velocities and related amplitudes suggest subtle parasympathetic involvement.
    Brain Injury 07/2015; DOI:10.3109/02699052.2015.1045029
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    ABSTRACT: Data on children's adjustment following parental acquired brain injury (ABI) are disparate and spare, and appear inconclusive. Nonetheless, they suggest that children's well-being is at risk, but often neglected. Indeed, lack of a unifying conceptual model makes it difficult to integrate available evidence, in order to circumscribe relevant factors and understand how these may influence children's outcomes in more or less favourable ways. The present review proposes the coping competence model as a theoretical framework apt to clarify these issues and organize the available evidence. In brief, the model states that impact of parental ABI on children reflects the extent of the challenges children face and their preponderant ways of coping with them, i.e. pro-socially, anti-socially or asocially. Evidence shows that children deal with some common socioaffective as well as achievement challenges. Further, it is consistent with the three main coping modalities supported by the model. Overall, children's outcomes appear variable, but clearly at risk and in need of special attention. This review summarizes these outcomes, raises conceptual as well as methodological questions to be addressed in future research and eventually presents relevant issues for support and clinical services.
    Brain Injury 07/2015; DOI:10.3109/02699052.2014.976272
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    ABSTRACT: To provide new information on properties of skateboarders who were hospital admitted with head injuries with details of the injuries including region of head impact. Hospital records of patients aged 15 and older with a skateboard injury admitted to one Level II Trauma Centre during a 10-year period were reviewed. Data on demographic, exposure, severity, diagnostic and clinical factors for patients with head injury (HI) and without HI (N-HI) were compared analytically. While there were no differences for patients with HI and N-HI by age, gender, mechanism of injury or alcohol use, patients with HI were more severely injured. Although significantly more head impacts occurred to the occipital region of the head, haematomas and/or contusions were much more likely to occur in the frontal region of the brain. Acute neurosurgical intervention was needed in 14% of HI skateboarders. Skateboarding is not an innocuous recreational activity, with head injury present in 75% of patients who were hospital-admitted. Pre-hospital treatment protocols should be aware of this growing injured population. Falls while on a skateboard lead to impacts to the back of head with a contra-coup brain injury resulting in severe and sometimes fatal outcomes. The very low prevalence of helmet use among skateboarders with head injuries indicates that greater efforts should be directed toward incentives for their use.
    Brain Injury 07/2015; DOI:10.3109/02699052.2014.989404