Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management

Publisher: Emerald

Description

As the essential resource for fashion management research, which can be applied in the workplace, the Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management seeks to draw contributions from around the world. With an eminent editorial team of industry experts, the journal covers all activities relating to the management and marketing functions in the garment manufacturing and retail sectors (as opposed to fibre or fabric issues).

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
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  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
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  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management website
  • Other titles
    Journal of fashion marketing and management (Online), Fashion marketing and management
  • ISSN
    1361-2026
  • OCLC
    50167017
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Emerald

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Voluntary deposit by author of author's pre-print or author's post-print allowed on author's personal website or Institutional repository, where there is no mandate to deposit
    • If mandated by a funding agency, the author's post-print may be deposited in any open access repository after a 24 months embargo period
    • Author's pre-print and Author's post-print not allowed on subject-based repository
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set statement
    • Non-commercial
    • Publisher last contacted on 02/04/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ Social co-creation refers to the process of using social media as a vehicle to carry out customer co-creation engagements. By allowing many customers to contribute to a specific co-creation initiative, social media makes co-creation platforms more efficient. The purpose of this paper is to examine: first, whether usability and information quality, visual appeal and image, interactivity, and web innovativeness, as perceived web site quality dimensions, were related to value equity; second, whether value equity was related to commitment and repurchase loyalty to social co-creation; and third, the moderating effects of aesthetic appreciation and fashion opinion leadership. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The conceptual foundation was based on the Quality-Value-Satisfaction model. Data were collected from US online apparel shoppers (n=691) using a consumer panel via an online survey. Structural equation modeling was employed to test the proposed model and research hypotheses. Findings ‐ Usability and information quality, visual appeal and image, interactivity, and web innovativeness had indirect influences on commitment and repurchase loyalty, mediated by value equity of social co-creation. Originality/value ‐ This proposed model may provide useful insights for apparel e-retailers to use in order to differentiate their e-strategies and develop successful social co-creation web sites. Furthermore, the proposed strategies will enable apparel e-retailers to fulfill customers' increasing demand for more interactive and online social shopping experiences that utilize the customer's own creativity.
    Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 10/2014; 18(4).
  • Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 07/2014; 18(3):338-356.
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to develop industry specific operational definitions for marketing dimensions and sub-variables in the luxury goods industry that will contribute to the growing body of company-based research on luxury brand management. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Case study of a leading luxury goods conglomerate provides operational definitions and insight into best practices for management of a luxury goods brand through an in-depth historical review and analysis of variables, measures, relationships, and patterns that emerged throughout the study of the sample company. Findings ‐ Successes and failures of brand management for the sample company for the umbrella variables of brand strategy, growth trade-offs, and strategic planning, and their associated sub-variables, were identified in the review of literature and were analyzed, adapted, and enumerated according to findings from the case study. Research limitations/implications ‐ Results limited to the study of one sample company. Common themes were identified in the management of a luxury brand that can be used by researchers to study other luxury companies. Practical implications ‐ Variables and measures for luxury brand management were identified throughout the review of literature and verified throughout the case study as being instrumental in brand management success of a leading luxury goods conglomerate and may be relevant to other luxury companies aiming to hone their brand management strategies. Originality/value ‐ Luxury goods research is increasing in prominence, but the majority of this research is consumer-based. This research contributes to the growing body of company-based luxury research.
    Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 05/2014; 18(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to explore the potentially conflicting positive and negative ethical aspects of wool apparel and the relative importance of these ethical attributes when consumers in the USA make wool apparel purchase decisions. Design/methodology/approach ‐ A two-stage mixed-method approach was used to explore the positive and negative ethical aspects of wool apparel and the relative importance of these ethical attributes in wool apparel purchase decisions. First, focus groups were used to identify ethical attributes that were important to wool apparel consumers in the USA. In the second stage, a conjoint survey was used to estimate the relative importance of the ethical and product attributes that were identified in the focus groups and the trade-offs made within this attribute set. Findings ‐ Seven themes of ethical issues related to wool apparel consumption emerged during the focus groups: animal welfare, workers' rights, environmental impact, extrinsic attributes, natural wool, country of origin (COO) and fair trade. In the conjoint analysis respondents identified COO as having the highest relative importance, followed by price, brand, ethical attributes and style. A cluster analysis of survey responses suggested there were two clusters that differed in the importance they attached to ethical labelling issues in wool apparel. The first cluster, did not place a great deal of importance on the ethical labelling issues included in the study, however, the second smaller cluster, ethical issues, specifically the humane treatment of sheep, were considered most important. Originality/value ‐ The study identified wool apparel attributes that were valued by American consumers. That product attributes were more important than ethical attributes suggests a focus on ethical credentials alone may not be effective in wool marketing. Wool apparel was more likely to be purchased by American consumers if they were made in the USA, reasonably priced, made by an independent brand, from humanely produced wool and in a comfortable style.
    Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 05/2014; 18(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to discuss and identify consumer-brand relationships in a luxury brand context. The focus is on consumer-brand relationship forms emerging in relation to step-down line extensions of luxury brands. The study is positioned within fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach - A qualitative research approach is adopted analyzing data from 13 open consumer-interviews. Photo collages of luxury brands and their step-down line extension logos were used as inspiration for informants in the interviews.Findings - Findings show that consumer-brand relationships mostly follow earlier identified consumer-brand relationships. However, five new relationship types (status, inspirational, impulse, rewarding, and turncoat) are identified. All but status-relationships can be generalized also to other contexts than the luxury brand context. Research limitations/implications - The study advances the understanding of luxury products and their step-down line extensions from a consumer perspective. However, due to the exploratory nature of the study the data is limited.Practical implications - This study showed that step-down line extensions are not perceived as that important that they couldn’t be replaced with another brand in the same product category. Informants often preferred step-down line extensions to parent brands due to their more suitable design, even when the informant was hypothetically asked if the opinion would change if economic issues weren’t a restraint. Managers are encouraged to analyze their brands based on a brand-relationship approach.Originality/value - The study uses the concept consumer-brand relationship as a new way to understand how consumers relate to line extensions in a luxury brand context. The approach is novel.
    Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 05/2014; 18(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this study is to invoke a consumer socialization approach to compare mothers and tween daughters on variables that may shape their clothing preferences and consumption behaviors. Additionally, this study explored the variables that predict how mothers and daughters respond to Pretty Brainy, an online clothing company that incorporates prosocial messaging into its product design and marketing. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Data were collected from 106 mother-daughter pairs using an online survey. In completing the survey, participants were instructed to view and evaluate the Pretty Brainy brand web site and clothing. Findings ‐ Mothers and daughters assigned similar degrees of importance to several clothing characteristics ‐ including aesthetics/design, comfort, fit, use of socially responsible construction/production methods, and use of high performance technology ‐ providing support for the consumer socialization model. Mothers and daughters were not similar on all clothing constructs explored, however, differing on the importance of some clothing characteristics examined (notably, brand name), as well as past socially responsible clothing purchase behavior, clothing involvement, and proximity of clothing to self. These differences may be explained in part by the mothers' and daughters' respective life stages. Among both mothers and daughters, attitude toward brand was the strongest predictor of purchase intention toward Pretty Brainy, which is consistent with established models of the attitude-intention relationship. Originality/value ‐ This study provides understanding about the influence of mothers upon tween girls' clothing consumption behaviors, helping to clarify inconsistencies in prior work as well as lending new insights into the role of mothers in socializing their daughters with respect to socially responsible clothing consumption.
    Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 03/2014; 18(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ Uppsala internationalisation theory is highly utilised due to its simplicity and applicability. However, there are contrasting results on its assumption that firms follow a gradual internationalisation process. Literature shows that firm strategies (e.g. targeting a niche market) and firm resources (e.g. brand image and asset specificity) may decrease barriers of entry. Global fashion retailers possess these characteristics and may not follow a gradual internationalisation pattern. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to examine whether fashion retailers that target a niche market, have a strong brand image and asset specificity will follow a gradual internationalisation pattern suggested by Uppsala. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Two aspects of internationalisation (speed of internationalisation and market selection) were analysed. Market selection was measured by three aspects of distance (geographic distance, economic distance, and culture distance). Data were collected utilising secondary sources and internationalisation patterns were calculated using existing formulas. Findings ‐ Overall, results provided partial support for Uppsala model. After cautious expansion early in internationalisation, fashion retailers experience a period where rapid expansion exists. During initial internationalisation, geographically and economically close markets were chosen, which mirror the Uppsala model. However, no incremental patterns were observed thereafter. In addition, after initially moving to culturally close countries, firms moved to countries with close cultural proximity to each other rather than close to home market. Research limitations/implications ‐ The findings are based on three cases of fast fashion retailers; thus, for further generalisation, if the findings will be applicable to other fashion firms which have different strategies and resources needs to be examined. Originality/value ‐ This study is one of the first attempts to research the applicability of Uppsala model to fashion retailers. By investigating fashion retailers that target niche markets, have strong brand image and asset specificity; the paper adds additional empirical evidence of situations where internationalisation does not follow the linear pattern that Uppsala model argues.
    Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 03/2014; 18(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this paper is to explore the decision-making process used by luxury fashion retail buyers in Greece in order to assess the applicability of Sheth’s (1981) model to the selection of brands and collections by retail buyers in luxury fashion resellers. It provides an insight into the decision-making practice of retail buyers in Greek luxury fashion retailers, where the buying task involves balancing the retailer’s commercial interests with a more cultural role in terms of shaping fashion trends and generating PR and publicity for the retailer. The task is further complicated by the power imbalance between retailer and brand, enabling brands to impose limitations on the buyer’s decision. Additionally, the combined influence of shortening product life cycles, increasing product variety and the emergence of a new and younger luxury fashion consumer requires a shift from intuitive to scientific, data-driven decision making.
    Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 03/2014; 18(1):85-106.
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to explore the unique resources that Indian apparel exporting firms claim to have and the key resources that help provide competitive advantage to these firms. Design/methodology/approach ‐ A web-based content analysis of texts available on "About Us" or related sections of the Indian export firms was conducted. Text data were coded and interpreted. Findings ‐ Physical resources seemed to be one of the most critical resources for their competitive advantages for the study samples. The ability to provide affordable and competitive prices for their products and experience in exporting were recognized as important firm resource described by the study samples. Research limitations/implications ‐ The study results supported the resource-based theory of the firm by showing additional key firm resources, such as ability to maintain domestic operations and to provide competitive prices that Indian apparel exporters claimed to have. Generalizability of the results is cautioned due to the content and analysis mode of the study data. Practical implications ‐ The results indicate that design capabilities, flexible production systems, and skilled labor are the key resources that provide Indian apparel industry the competitive advantage over its competitors. Therefore, Indian apparel exporters may want to continue to strengthen and emphasize these abilities to foreign buyers to complete in the global marketplace. Originality/value ‐ Given the importance of Indian apparel industry in the global market place, this study builds a knowledge base of the key resources possessed by the Indian apparel export firms.
    Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 01/2014; 18(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to derive a comprehensive model with integrated dimensions of trait constructs to understand the shoppers' dispositional traits in consumption. This study endeavors to gain empirical validation of a motivational network of shoppers' traits in consumption as well as to ascertain different shoppers' typology from the configurations of personal factor attributes. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Store-intercept method was used to collect data from a sample of 600 apparel adult shoppers at five shopping malls in Klang Valley, Malaysia. The factor structure of personal factors was achieved using confirmatory factory analysis. The hierarchical and non-hierarchical cluster analysis was employed to develop the shoppers' typology. Findings ‐ A relatively good fit in confirmatory factor analysis validates the applicability of the conceptualized personal factor attributes measurement model. The constitution of personal factor attributes results in three shoppers typology of Confident, Enthusiastic Shoppers; Moderate, Pragmatic Shoppers and Self-Confined, Apathetic Shoppers. Practical implications ‐ The study provides an understanding of the personal attribute factors and disseminates insightful information about profile of shoppers' typology. Accordingly, the implementation of the strategy which involving the personality and psychological desires of the consumers, is now possible. Originality/value ‐ This paper stipulates new insights to discern other dimensions in personality traits to examine the personal factor attributes, by considering the elemental traits, compound traits, situational traits and surface traits in a holistic manner. The findings of this study advance the knowledge on personal factor attributes that shape shopping behavior along with practical applications.
    Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 01/2014; 18(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to examine affect of cosmopolitanism and consumers' susceptibility to interpersonal influence on Indian consumers' fashion clothing involvement. Moderating effect of demographics was studied. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Survey technique through self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection in both metropolitan and non-metropolitan cities in India. Findings ‐ Utilitarian, value expressive factors of normative influence and cosmopolitanism influence Indian consumers' fashion clothing involvement. Type of city, income, and education moderated influence of normative values and cosmopolitanism on fashion clothing involvement. Research limitations/implications ‐ One of the major limitations of current research was that it had a large number of respondents in the age group of 18-40 years. Future research can attempt to reduce age biasness. Practical implications ‐ The findings can prove helpful to international apparel brands marketing luxury and fashion clothing in India. However, since conformance to social norms was important for Indians, clothing manufacturers should use reference groups, opinion leaders, and celebrities to generate awareness. A blend of global and local lifestyle should be used. International luxury brands can customize their products to combine ethnic tastes. Originality/value ‐ Fashion clothing market promises immense growth opportunities in India. There is limited research to examine influence cosmopolitanism on Indian consumers' consumption behaviour. Knowledge about influence of global lifestyle, brands, mass media, and services on Indian consumers' behaviour can help in targeting them effectively.
    Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 01/2014; 18(4).
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    ABSTRACT: To comprehend tablet catalog marketing, the purpose of the study is to obtain an integrated descriptive analysis of tablet catalogs and to compare the value propositions between retailers' and aggregators' applications (apps). Design/methodology/approach-A total of 28 tablet catalog apps were content analyzed in terms of interface attributes. Next, based on the results, a chi-square analysis was applied to compare the value proposition between retailers and aggregators.
    Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 01/2014; 18(3):321-337.
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ Excess consumption of apparel is driven by the apparel industry to offer more styles at lower prices in shorter time and the consumers' desire to change fashion. The purpose of this paper is to apply adaptable design in apparel as a sustainable design solution for excess consumption problem. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Guided by sustainable apparel design model C2CAD, two adaptable apparel prototypes for female college students were designed and developed. Focus group discussion and wear test were conducted with female college students to evaluate users' acceptance, fit, comfort, and adaptability of the two prototypes. Findings ‐ Both prototypes were comfortable to wear by users with different sizes, indicating the users could wear the garment when she changed size. The adaptations and conversions were easily and enjoyably figured out by the users. The users would keep and use the adaptable apparel for a long time. The users would also buy fewer apparel if they were to own the adaptable apparel. Adaptable apparel would increase apparel utilization, eliminate the need to purchase unnecessary additional amount of clothing, and reduce excess consumption. Originality/value ‐ This research provided a pilot study on adaptable apparel design as an innovative approach to help solve excessive consumption problem. The adaptable garment prototypes would allow the fashion-forward female college student to easily change the function, fit, and style of the environmentally friendly garments.
    Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 01/2014; 18(1):52-69.
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to study the reuse and recycling of garments from the fashion industry's perspective. Through multiple case studies the paper maps the emerging organizational field of post-retail responsibility of garments, describing how and why several fashion companies have engaged with reuse and recycling practices and which opportunities and challenges they face. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The study relies on the qualitative multiple explorative case study method. The data were collected from 12 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with seven fashion companies and documentation analyses of two companies. Data were analyzed using the thematic analyses approach. The main limitation of the study is the limited selection of cases and therefore a larger data set and further studies are required to extend the understanding of the phenomenon for more generalized statements and in-depth understanding. Findings ‐ The findings demonstrate that post-retail responsibility of fashion is an emerging field in the fashion industry that offers several business opportunities to fashion companies, but also requires rethinking of existing value propositions and engagement of a wider stakeholder group in order to find sustainable solutions for garments' end of life. The field is still new with limited best practice, however, two main strategies of how fashion companies address post-retail responsibility of their products can be distinguished: second hand retailing and product take-back schemes. Originality/value ‐ This paper contributes to research by advancing understanding of fashion industry's role in the end-of-life of their products and the associated opportunities and challenges. This study belongs to the first round of research that directly addresses the post-consumer textile waste from the fashion industry's perspective.
    Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management 01/2014; 18(4).