Aging and Mental Health (AGING MENT HEALTH )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

Aging & Mental Health provides a forum for the rapidly expanding field which investigates the relationship between the aging process and mental health. The international impact of the journal is now well recognized. It has readers in over 30 countries, a good impact factor and has been accepted for coverage in MEDLINE, Current Contents and other widely used indexing systems. The journal addresses the mental changes associated with normal and abnormal or pathological aging, as well as the psychological and psychiatric problems of the aging population. Aging & Mental Health covers the biological, psychological and social aspects of aging as they relate to mental health. In particular it encourages an integrated approach between the various biopsychosocial processes and etiological factors associated with psychological changes in the elderly. It also emphasizes the various strategies, therapies and services which may be directed at improving the mental health of the elderly. In this way the journal has a strong alliance between the theoretical, experimental and applied sciences across a range of issues affecting mental health and aging. The journal provides an original and dynamic focus to help integrate the normal and abnormal aspects of mental health in aging. In addition, theoretical issues can be set in the context of the important new practical developments in this field.

  • Impact factor
    1.68
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.98
  • Cited half-life
    6.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.28
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.64
  • Website
    Aging & Mental Health website
  • Other titles
    Aging & mental health (Online), Aging and mental health
  • ISSN
    1360-7863
  • OCLC
    37914852
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Prior research identifies that psychological outcomes among dementia caregivers are associated with their use of coping strategies. Few studies have tested the association of coping and health longitudinally. Method: This study examined factors associated with the use of coping strategies over time and their associations with physical and mental health outcomes in a population-based sample of 226 dementia caregivers in Cache County, Utah, USA. Caregivers annually completed the Ways of Coping Checklist-Revised, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and a health interview. Care-recipient cognitive and functional abilities were obtained using the Mini-Mental State Exam and the Clinical Dementia Rating. Neuropsychiatric symptoms were assessed using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Results: Caregivers most frequently identified providing care as a problem (37.6%). Linear mixed models of caregiver coping strategies found that the use of most strategies were stable except for increasing Avoidance among adult child caregivers (β = 0.14, p = 0.048). On average, increased Wishful Thinking (β = 2.48, p < 0.001) or Blames Self (β = 1.06, p = 0.002) was associated with higher anxiety scores. Increased use of Blames Others among males (interaction, β = 0.28, p = 0.02) and greater use of Wishful Thinking among younger caregivers (interaction, β = -0.01, p = 0.01) were associated with more caregiver health conditions. Coping strategies were not associated with change in anxiety or health conditions over time. Conclusion: Our results emphasize the importance of caregiver coping strategies on caregiver health and well-being and may identify subgroups of persons at risk for worse outcomes.
    Aging and Mental Health 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Natural disasters are associated with catastrophic losses. Disaster survivors return to devastated communities and rebuild homes or relocate permanently, although the long-term psychological consequences are not well understood. The authors examined predictors of psychological outcomes in 219 residents of disaster-affected communities in south Louisiana. Method: Current coastal residents with severe property damage from the 2005 Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and exposure to the 2010 British Petroleum Deepwater Horizon oil spill were compared and contrasted with former coastal residents and an indirectly affected control group. Participants completed measures of storm exposure and stressors, religiosity, perceived social support, and mental health. Results: Non-organizational religiosity was a significant predictor of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions. Follow-up analyses revealed that more frequent participation in non-organizational religious behaviors was associated with a heightened risk of PTSD. Low income and being a coastal fisher were significant predictors of depression symptoms in bivariate and multivariate models. Perceived social support had a protective effect for all mental health outcomes, which also held for symptoms of depression and GAD in multivariate models. Conclusion: People who experienced recent and severe trauma related to natural and technological disasters are at risk for adverse psychological outcomes in the years after these events. Individuals with low income, low social support, and high levels of non-organizational religiosity are also at greater risk. Implications of these data for current views on the post-disaster psychological reactions and the development of age-sensitive interventions to promote long-term recovery are discussed.
    Aging and Mental Health 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Despite efforts to promote health equity, many American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations, including older adults, experience elevated levels of depression. Although adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and social support are well-documented risk and protective factors for depression in the general population, little is known about AI/AN populations, especially older adults. The purpose of this study was to examine factors related to depression among a sample of AI older adults in the midwest. Method: Data were collected using a self-administered survey completed by 233 AIs over the age of 50. The survey included standardized measures such as the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form, ACE Questionnaire, and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Hierarchical multivariate regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the main hypotheses of the study. Results: Two dimensions of ACE (i.e., childhood neglect, household dysfunction) were positively associated with depressive symptoms; social support was negatively associated with depressive symptoms. Perceived health and living alone were also significant predictors. Conclusion: ACE may play a significant role in depression among AI/AN across the life course and into old age. Social support offers a promising mechanism to bolster resilience among AI/AN older adults.
    Aging and Mental Health 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The aim was to assess the reliability and validity of the quality of life (QoL) instrument CASP-19, and three shorter versions of CASP-12 in large population sample of older adults from the HAPIEE (Health, Alcohol, and Psychosocial factors In Eastern Europe) study. Methods: From the Czech Republic, Russia, and Poland, 13,210 HAPIEE participants aged 50 or older completed the retirement questionnaire including CASP-19 at baseline. Three shorter 12-item versions were also derived from original 19-item instrument. Psychometric validation used confirmatory factor analysis, Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, and construct validity. Results: The second-order four-factor model of CASP-19 did not provide a good fit to the data. Two-factor CASP-12v.3 including residual covariances for negative items to account for the method effect of negative items had the best fit to the data in all countries (CFI = 0.98, TLI = 0.97, RMSEA = 0.05, and WRMR = 1.65 in the Czech Republic; 0.96, 0.94, 0.07, and 2.70 in Poland; and 0.93, 0.90, 0.08, and 3.04 in Russia). Goodness-of-fit indices for the two-factor structure were substantially better than second-order models. Conclusions: This large population-based study is the first validation study of CASP scale in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), which includes a general population sample in Russia, Poland, and the Czech Republic. The results of this study have demonstrated that the CASP-12v.3 is a valid and reliable tool for assessing QoL among adults aged 50 years or older. This version of CASP is recommended for use in future studies investigating QoL in the CEE populations.
    Aging and Mental Health 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: This paper examines the mediating effect of child-grandparent conflict on the relationship between child trauma exposure and grandparenting stress. Methods: Data was collected from a sample of custodial grandparents who participated in kinship care or relative caregiving programs (n = 251). Grandparenting stress was measured with Parenting Stress Scale (Berry & Jones, 1995 ) modified for grandparents. A series of regression models and structural equation models (SEM) were used to test the relationship between the number of different types of child trauma exposures and grandparenting stress, and to examine the mediating effect of child-grandparent conflicts on the relationship. Results: Almost three-fourths (72%) of children had experienced at least one type of traumatic exposure. The SEM model shows that child's trauma exposure indirectly affected grandparenting stress, mediated by child-grandparenting conflicts though no direct path between the child's trauma exposure variable and grandparenting stress was found. A higher level of child-grandparent conflicts was also associated with a lower level of emotional well-being among custodial grandparents. Conclusion: Based on these findings, recommendations are made about how to tailor a trauma-informed approach to the needs of custodial grandparents.
    Aging and Mental Health 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Depression and depressive symptoms predict death, but it is less clear if more general measures of life satisfaction (LS) predict death. Our objectives were to determine: (1) if LS predicts mortality over a five-year period in community-living older adults; and (2) which aspects of LS predict death. Method: 1751 adults over the age of 65 who were living in the community were sampled from a representative population sampling frame in 1991/1992 and followed five years later. Age, gender, and education were self-reported. An index of multimorbidity and the Older American Resource Survey measured health and functional status, and the Terrible-Delightful Scale assessed overall LS as well as satisfaction with: health, finances, family, friends, housing, recreation, self-esteem, religion, and transportation. Cox proportional hazards models examined the influence of LS on time to death. Results: 417 participants died during the five-year study period. Overall LS and all aspects of LS except finances, religion, and self-esteem predicted death in unadjusted analyses. In fully adjusted analyses, LS with health, housing, and recreation predicted death. Other aspects of LS did not predict death after accounting for functional status and multimorbidity. Conclusion: LS predicted death, but certain aspects of LS are more strongly associated with death. The effect of LS is complex and may be mediated or confounded by health and functional status. It is important to consider different domains of LS when considering the impact of this important emotional indicator on mortality among older adults.
    Aging and Mental Health 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects twice as many women as men. Gender differences in symptom profile, living conditions, coping style and response might affect the outcome of psychosocial interventions (PSIs). Objectives: Our aim was to review gender differences in the available high-quality phase III trials on PSI in AD and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) by considering the gender ratio in the investigated samples. Design: Randomized controlled trials published in 2000-2012 were stepwise analyzed by statistically testing the representativeness of the gender ratio and examining reported gender differences. Results: Forty-five studies (62% of 73 studies) reported gender ratios for each subsample and were included. In these studies, females were underrepresented in the control groups. In the 14 studies (19%) reporting analyses of gender differences, women were underrepresented in both intervention and control groups. However, in the six studies (8%) reporting significant gender differences in outcome, gender distribution was in accordance with prevalence rates. Conclusion: Current evidence is insufficient for reliable conclusions on gender differences in PSI outcome in AD and aMCI, as 81% of the available clinical trials either not reported the gender ratio of their samples, or underrepresent females. Further research is needed addressing gender differences, and clinical trials should routinely control for gender bias.
    Aging and Mental Health 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Previous work suggests that husbands and wives are likely to share affective states so that depression or happiness in one spouse is predictive of depression or happiness in the other. Studies that have examined spousal affect similarity, however, have been concentrated in the Western world where the meaning of marriage may be different than it is in other cultural contexts. Marriage in India, unlike that in the United States, is focused on the extended family so that love and intimacy between spouses are downplayed. This study examined affect and well-being similarity between 603 older married couples in India using pilot data from the Longitudinal Aging Study of India. Method: We ran linear regression models to assess the relationship between the well-being states of husbands and wives using dyadic observations for four different measures: depressive symptoms, dissatisfaction with daily life, social isolation, and overall life satisfaction. Results: Across all four measures, the well-being scores of one spouse were positively and significantly associated with the well-being scores of the other. These associations did not vary by marital satisfaction, but were slightly stronger for respondents reporting poor health. Conclusion: Our increased understanding of social connectedness has prompted a shift from the consideration of single individuals to a broader understanding of individuals in the context of their social environments. The results of this study suggest that interventions designed to foster well-being among older adults in India might benefit from a focus on couples as a unit rather than individuals.
    Aging and Mental Health 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of agitation in mild cognitive impairment (MCI, Petersen's criteria) and patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD), and to characterize the associated behavioral symptoms. Method: A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a prospective, longitudinal study on behavioral symptoms was performed, including 268 MCI and 393 AD patients. Behavioral assessment was performed through Middelheim Frontality Score (MFS), Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Rating Scale (Behave-AD) and Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD). Agitated behavior was considered to be clinically relevant when one or more items of the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI) occurred at least once a week. Results: The prevalence of agitation in AD (76%) was higher than in MCI (60%; p < 0.001). Patients with agitation showed more severe frontal lobe, behavioral and depressive symptoms (MFS, Behave-AD and CSDD total scores). In agitated AD patients, all behavioral symptoms and types of agitation were more severe compared to non-agitated AD patients, but in agitated MCI patients only for diurnal rhythm disturbances. This resulted in more severe Behave-AD global scores in patients with agitation as compared to patients without agitation. Comparing MCI and AD patients, MCI patients with agitation showed more severe behavioral and depressive symptoms than AD patients without agitation. The structure of agitation in AD consisted of more aggressive and physically non-aggressive behavior than in MCI. Conclusion: Frontal lobe, behavioral and depressive symptoms are more severe in MCI and AD patients with clinically relevant agitation as compared to patients without agitation. However, this association is less pronounced in MCI.
    Aging and Mental Health 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: This study intends to explore older patients' experiences of the emotional support received from registered nurses (RNs). We also aimed to gain deeper knowledge about the process of how getting the support they need is managed by the patient. Methods: The study was conducted using the grounded theory method. Data were collected by interviewing 18 patients between 80 and 96 years old. Results: Reasons why older patients experienced the emotional support received from the RN are reflected in the categories 'Meets my needs when I am irresolute', 'Meets my needs when I am vulnerable' and 'Meets my needs when I am in need of sympathy'. Reasons to the emotional support resulted in that patients experienced 'A sense of being able to hand over', which is therefore the core category of this study. Conclusion: Older patients' experiences of emotional support are about obtaining relief. Patients were active participants and had strategies for which they wanted to share their emotions with the RN. In order to develop participatory care for older patients, we need more knowledge about how emotional support can be used as a nursing intervention.
    Aging and Mental Health 06/2014;
  • Aging and Mental Health 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Involuntary employment exit in later life has been shown to be a risk factor for poor physical and mental health. This study aims to examine the relationship between involuntary employment exit in later life and subsequent risk of reporting major depression or being prescribed anti-depressant medication (ADM). Method: Data were drawn from four waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). This is a nationally representative longitudinal cohort survey of persons employed in Sweden in 2003 and 2005. The sample was restricted to respondents who had exited the labour market aged 50+ years between 2006 and 2012 (N = 1433). Major depression was measured using the Symptom Checklist Core Depression Scale (SCL-CD6). Prescription ADM redeemed from a pharmacy was based on the National Prescribed Drug Register. Results: After controlling for socio-demographic variables, health, health behaviours, and baseline depression, involuntary employment exit was associated with an increased risk of reporting major depression (OR 3.16; CI 1.32-7.61) and becoming newly prescribed ADM (HR 2.08; CI 1.03-4.21) compared to voluntary employment exit. Conclusion: Involuntary employment exit represents a risk for subsequent depression in later life. Mental health and social services ought to consider identifying these individuals for possible intervention programs to reduce the burden of depression in later life.
    Aging and Mental Health 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: This review aims to explore the role of self-efficacy (SE) in the health-related quality of life (QoL) of family carers of people with dementia. Methods: A systematic review of literature identified a range of qualitative and quantitative studies. Search terms related to caring, SE, and dementia. Narrative synthesis was adopted to synthesise the findings. Results: Twenty-two studies met the full inclusion criteria, these included 17 quantitative, four qualitative, and one mixed-method study. A model describing the role of task/domain-specific SE beliefs in family carer health-related QoL was constructed. This model was informed by review findings and discussed in the context of existing conceptual models of carer adaptation and empirical research. Review findings offer support for the application of the SE theory to caring and for the two-factor view of carer appraisals and well-being. Findings do not support the independence of the negative and positive pathways. The review was valuable in highlighting methodological challenges confronting this area of research, particularly the conceptualisation and measurement issues surrounding both SE and health-related QoL. Conclusions: The model might have theoretical implications in guiding future research and advancing theoretical models of caring. It might also have clinical implications in facilitating the development of carer support services aimed at improving SE. The review highlights the need for future research, particularly longitudinal research, and further exploration of domain/task-specific SE beliefs, the influence of carer characteristics, and other mediating/moderating variables.
    Aging and Mental Health 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Booster sessions as a means of maintaining the benefits of psycho-educational programs have received little attention in caregiving research. Caregivers were offered a booster session following participation in a program entitled Learning to Become a Family Caregiver (LBFC) intended to facilitate transition to the caregiver role after diagnostic disclosure of dementia in a relative. The 90-minute booster session served to review program content and afforded the opportunity to discuss and practice learned skills. This study sought to test the efficacy of the booster session in maintaining or recovering program effects at six months post-program. Method: Participants in the program were randomly assigned to a group that received the booster session (n = 31) or a group that did not (n = 29). A third control group was also formed, which continued to receive only the usual care provided in memory clinics. Eligible participants - French-speaking primary caregivers of a relative diagnosed with Alzheimer's in the past nine months - were recruited in memory clinics in Quebec (Canada). Participants were blindly assessed before randomization and six months after the booster session on outcomes associated with a healthy role transition. Results: Prediction analyses revealed one significant positive effect of the booster session: emergence of preparedness to provide care. Moreover, with or without the booster session, the program continued to have a positive effect on psychological distress and contributed to the emergence of self-efficacy in dealing with caregiving situations. The booster session had no significant effect on knowledge of services, planning for future care needs, use of reframing as a coping strategy, perceived informal support, and family conflicts. Conclusion: The limited effect observed is discussed in terms of the booster session's content and intensity. Recommendations are made for designing future research on the effect of booster sessions, including the importance of including a placebo booster group.
    Aging and Mental Health 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: In research as well as in the practice of caregiver counselling, the subjective burden of family caregivers is considered an important characteristic of home care. The objective of the present study was to provide an extended validation of the German language version of the Burden Scale for Family Caregivers (BSFC) published in 2001. Methods: Extended validation was performed using medical, interview, and health insurance data of 351 informal caregivers and their relatives who had dementia. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to assess the internal consistency of the items, and an exploratory factor analysis was conducted to determine the structure of the BSFC. The discriminatory power and item difficulties of the 28 BSFC items were examined. Five research questions addressed construct validity. Question six addressed the BSFC score as a potential predictor of institutionalization at a follow-up time of 2.5 years (predictive validity). Results: Exploratory factor analysis indicated that the BSFC had a single-factor structure. Cronbach's alpha for the total scale was 0.93. A significant increase in the BSFC score was observed when the severity of cognitive impairment increased, persons with dementia showed disturbing behaviour, caregivers were diagnosed with depression, care requirements increased, or the family caregiver and the person with dementia lived together. Caregiver burden emerged as a significant predictor of institutionalization. The validity of the BSFC was confirmed by the results. Conclusion: The BSFC score allows for a valid assessment of the total caregiver burden in both research and practice. The BSFC is available for free in 20 languages ( http://www.caregiver-burden.eu ).
    Aging and Mental Health 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To estimate incidence, identify consequences and potential risk factors for harm in people with dementia who got lost in one UK policing region. Methods: In a retrospective observational study, data were extracted from missing-person records over a four-year period in one UK policing region (population of 2.1 million). Results: Two hundred and eighty-one incidents of getting lost were identified. Incidence of getting lost was estimated at 0.5% of the regional dementia population. Fifty-nine percent of reports came from domestic settings, 29% from care homes/hospitals, and 12% on excursions from home. Five percent (n = 15) sustained significant harm, including two deaths. Average age was 78 years (SD 8.3). Harm was associated with older age (mean difference 6.16 years, CI 1.86 to 10.46, p = 0.005, t = 2.82), length of time missing (Mdn time 2.48 hours; IQR 0.97 to 9.45, p = 0.02), and season (9% winter, 2% summer, p = 0.006). The length of time missing increased with delays in reporting to police (r = 0.15, p = 0.018), getting lost at night (Mdn time 1.70 hours, IQR 0.52-3.32, p = 0.028), driving themselves (Mdn time 2.45 hours, IQR 0.42-2.00, p = 0.001), and using public transport (Mdn 1.78 hours, IQR 1.07-3.92, p = 0.001). Conclusion: Incidence in this study suggests getting lost is a low-frequency event for people with dementia but for a small minority, the risks are considerable. Exploratory analyses suggest individual and environmental factors increase the risk of harm. Suitable methods need to be developed to replicate these findings in larger prospective samples. A focus on the predictors of harm may aid development of assessment protocols to ensure intervention is proportionate.
    Aging and Mental Health 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: We investigated grandmothers' personal growth, their engagement with grandchildren, their satisfaction with this role and how personal growth was related to engagement and satisfaction. Method: One thousand two hundred and five grandmothers completed a survey containing questions about: personal resources (age, education, whether partnered or not, health); engagement with grandchildren (number of grandchildren, hours spent per week, frequency of activities, satisfaction with being a grandmother); and personal growth (life satisfaction, generativity). Results: Participants had a positive sense of living productive and worthwhile lives with most reporting high scores on life satisfaction and generativity. Most were actively engaged with their grandchildren, participating in a wide range of activities. Active engagement was positively related to grandmother satisfaction. Hierarchical regressions showed that both life satisfaction and generativity were significantly predicted by grandmother resources and grandmother engagement. Conclusion: This group of grandmothers did not fit ageist stereotypes of disengagement and loss of function. Our study shows that grandmothering is a rewarding role, and women who engage with it have a positive sense of personal growth.
    Aging and Mental Health 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Approximately 32.7% of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in the USA are now over the age of 50. Women comprise a significant percentage of the US HIV epidemic and the percentage of women diagnosed with HIV continues to grow; however, little is known about women's experiences living and coping with HIV over time. The goal of this study was to explore the experiences of US women over 50 living with HIV to better understand how they make sense of their diagnosis and cope with their illness over time and during the aging process. Method: Nineteen women (mean age = 56.79, SD = 4.63) referred from Boston-area organizations and hospitals completed one-time, in-depth individual interviews, out of which 47% of the participants were identified as Black/African Americans, and 37% as White. The average time since diagnosis was 16.32 years (SD = 5.70). Inclusion criteria included: (1) female sex, (2) aged 50 or older, (3) HIV diagnosis, and (4) English speaking. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach and NVivo 9 software. Results: Findings are described across the following themes: (1) experiences at diagnosis, (2) uncertainty of disease course, (3) acceptance, and (4) living 'well' with HIV. Participants appeared to be well adjusted to their HIV diagnosis and described a progression to acceptance and survivorship; they identified strategies to 'live well' in the context of HIV. For some, health-related uncertainty about the future remained. These findings were organized into a model of coping with HIV. Conclusion: Themes and issues identified by this study may help guide interventions across the lifespan for women with HIV.
    Aging and Mental Health 06/2014;

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