Sport Education and Society (SPORT EDUC SOC )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

Sport, Education and Society is an international journal which provides a focal point for the publication of research on pedagogy, policy and the wide range of associated social, cultural, political and ethical issues in physical activity and sport. The journal will concentrate both on the forms, contents and contexts of physical education and sport found in schools, colleges and other sites of formal education, and the pedagogies of play, callisthenics, gymnastics and sport found in familial environments, various sport clubs, the leisure industry, as well as private fitness and health studios, dance schools, gymnastic clubs and rehabilitation centres. Sport, Education and Society therefore wishes to encourage contributions not only from sports scientists working in the field of pedagogy but also from professionals with interests in theoretical and empirical issues relating to pedagogy, policy and the curriculum in physical activity and sport.

  • Impact factor
    1.17
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.25
  • Cited half-life
    7.60
  • Immediacy index
    0.11
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.43
  • Website
    Sport, Education and Society website
  • Other titles
    Sport, education and society (Online)
  • ISSN
    1357-3322
  • OCLC
    44547794
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the debate over health, one political message has become more and more dominant in western societies over the past decade: Get moving! The logic seems to be that physical activity per se equals better health and that the more physical activity, the better one's health. This logic has, among other things, induced an increased political focus on educational settings and physical education (PE) as a central place for promoting health by increasing physical activity. Today PE is often explicitly identified with health in contemporary school curricula, and this means that PE teachers unavoidably encounter contemporary perceptions of health and physical activity in their professional practice. Taking as its starting point four different teaching resources produced for health education in the Danish Primary School, this article presents four different health cultures and their recommendations for physical activity as a health-promoting practice. The aim is to challenge current perceptions of health and the related recommendations for physical activity in providing a springboard for health communicators and PE teachers to reflect on the health cultures they encounter and maybe to consider how these aligns their own preferred health culture.
    Sport Education and Society 11/2014; 19(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: All over the westernised world, sport has been promoted as a ‘solution’ to many of the social ‘problems’ and challenges that face modern societies. This study draw on Foucault's concept of governmentality to examine the ways in which Swedish Government Official Reports on sport, from 1922 to 1998, define social problems and legitimate governing, and sport as a solution, in the name of benefiting Swedish society. The analysis shows that citizens' ‘good’ and ‘healthy’ behaviour and bodies are in focus of problematisation throughout the studied period. In relation to this, sport is seen as an important tool and solution. Parallel with increased critique of sport in contemporary times, a neo-liberal governmentality is embraced which in turn affect how ‘problems’ and ‘solutions’ are thought of in individualistic and rational ways.
    Sport Education and Society 11/2014; 19(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper explores the role of reflexivity in habituation by contrasting the learning of aerobics and basketball with the acquisition of gendered bodily skills. The discussion is inspired by the paper So, how did Bourdieu learn to play tennis? Habitus, consciousness and habituation, by Noble and Watkins (2003), which represents a fruitful contribution to the debate on the roles of reflexivity and consciousness in learning. Still, this model of habituation remains one-dimensional, since it only addresses habituation involving reflexivity. Based on fieldwork at both a basketball club and an aerobic group for Muslim women, along with interviews with participants in the two arenas, we suggest that even though habituation often involves reflexivity, there are also forms of habituation that do not involve high degrees of consciousness. The paper adds to the on-going theoretical debate about the hybridisation of habitus and reflexivity by offering concrete and empirically based examples of different degrees of reflexivity involved in processes of habituation. This adds to a theoretical underpinning of habitus as a lived, changing category.
    Sport Education and Society 11/2014; 19(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: After critically analyzing some of the Spanish physical education's (PE) main justifications and pointing out their problematic effects on teachers and students, the paper proposes an alternative orientation to teaching and learning PE that fosters consciousness, centeredness and transformation. Drawing from arguments and examples taken from ‘Eastern’ martial arts, the paper introduces the Conscious System for the Movement Technique (CSMT)—a ‘Western,’ ontological, and holistic approach whose purpose is to help people find paths that may allow them to transcend present paradigms, become interpreters of themselves, and acquire knowledge about the use of their body as a totality that, essentially, is ‘the reflection of a complex and mysterious functioning.’ Following this introduction to the CSMT, the paper explains its methodological principles, process, practical applications and transformative effects.
    Sport Education and Society 11/2014; 19(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: While remarkably positive findings have been presented in research focusing on Sport Education in school settings, investigations on how preservice teachers learn to teach a new curriculum in physical education have been described as ‘the missing link’ in curriculum research. The purpose of this study was to introduce Sport Education to students in a Russian physical education pedagogical college, and to track their understanding of the model through a series of learning experiences. An action research methodology was employed as the main design of this study, which included four experience steps: lecturing, participating, planning and teaching. The most significant finding related to the knowledge that preservice teachers received during their intensive participation. In particular, this cohort of preservice teachers began with the misconception that Sport Education is a model where the teacher is essentially substituted by the students in terms of the operation of the class. However, by the end of the experience, the preservice teachers held the belief that Sport Education is more like a completely different teaching style where the teacher becomes a facilitator of class events. Nonetheless, their previous histories with physical education and their apprenticeships of observation strongly shaped their future intentions to teach the model.
    Sport Education and Society 11/2014; 19(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: During the past decades, significant progress has been made in the development of physical education and sport pedagogy (PESP) research with the field reaching a level of maturity and critical mass. In light of this development, it seems worthwhile to take an overarching view on existing evidence in order to identify a number of emerging challenges that researchers in PESP might want to address in future studies. We argue that there is an emerging consensus (in the English-language research community) that pedagogy is the proper object of study of educational research in physical education and sport, confirmed by the increasing prevalence of studies that explore relations between the components of teachers, teaching and teacher education, curriculum and learners and learning. At the same time, and despite evidence of development, we acknowledge that compared with other Kinesiology fields, PESP research has lacked influence and impact. In the present contribution, three features of future research in PESP are considered: practice-referenced research, a programmatic approach and interdisciplinary research. We conclude that strong leadership will be required to facilitate a future agenda, and that PESP researcher may need to begin to scale up their work and publish it in a wider range of educational research journals.
    Sport Education and Society 10/2014; 19(7).
  • Sport Education and Society 10/2014; 19(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Looked-after children are arguably one of the most disadvantaged groups in society and constitute a ‘hidden group’ in relation to sport and physical activity research, policy and practice. Research on looked-after children has explored the views of caregivers, practitioners and policy-makers who have often been asked to speak for children on their behalf. Through the use of the mosaic approach and innovative participatory methods, including peer interviewing, the purpose of this paper was to provide an insight into a new area of research in the field of sport and physical activity. As such, it reports on initial findings from a wider project with looked-after children that explores their sport and physical activity experiences. Specifically, it asks the following: (1) What are the sport and physical activity experiences of looked-after children? (2) What meanings and values do looked-after children ascribe to their engagement in sport and physical activity? Findings from the voices of four male looked-after children highlight that these young people used sport as a means to an end; to spend time with friends and develop stocks of social capital. However, due to changes in placement, they also experienced disrupted patterns of engagement coupled with additional institutional constraints that shaped access to sporting activities.
    Sport Education and Society 10/2014; 19(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: How might Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy (PESP) communities in the UK, Europe, Australasia and elsewhere go about researching the implications of neoliberalism and increasing privatisation of Education for the entitlements of young people to a common, comprehensive, high quality, equitable Physical Education (PE)? Our analyses suggest that research attention to the politics of identity, essentially, how pupils are positioned within institutions in ‘relation to’ various discourses, cultures and values given by the curriculum, pedagogical and assessment practices of schooling and Initial Teacher Education Physical Education (ITEPE) is a necessary but insufficient research agenda if the profession's project is social justice and pursuit of democratic ideals. The paper calls for some refocusing and expansion of sociological and educational research interests so that equal regard is paid to the political economy of education including ‘relations between’ PE and the new forms of governance and school organisation now featuring in countries across the globe. Together these relations within and between are altering the education landscape in new and unpredictable ways, including how social, cultural and physical capital is distributed and ‘consumed’ in and through PE in schools and ITEPE.
    Sport Education and Society 10/2014; 19(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Three decades after Daryl Siedentop announced sport pedagogy to be the forgotten sport science, the seven articles in this special issue collectively present sport pedagogy as an emergent field of research and practice. Each contribution presents one or more foci that invite attention to what and how we conduct our research, the political backcloth of research, the issues and challenges that accompany research programmes and where attention must be afforded to ensure an optimistic future for the field of sport pedagogy. As a field we must look beyond as well as within. Just as it is important to revisit what we consider to be the core of our discipline, it is also valuable to look beyond and across our discipline to ensure vibrant and progressive research.
    Sport Education and Society 10/2014; 19(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The European Union Sport Unit has identified the societal and educational role of sport as a central topic in its new research agenda. It is argued that European Union (EU) citizens should be supported to learn continuously across the life course. In the sport/physical activity (PA) context, the role of teachers, coaches and exercise instructors (among others) is pivotal to the delivery of this aspiration. Yet, in this paper, we argue that entrenched barriers between teaching, coaching and exercise instruction and the lack of a well-developed, integrative underpinning knowledge base centred on pedagogy are serious impediments. We suggest that the development of a new integrative subdiscipline in the Academy may help pedagogy, and pedagogy academics, to make a stronger contribution to addressing these barriers and gaps. ‘Sport & Exercise Pedagogy’ (SEP) is proposed as an education-based, boundary-crossing, multi/interdisciplinary area of study located in the field known variously as ‘Sport & Exercise Sciences’, ‘Kinesiology’ and ‘Human Movement Sciences’. SEP places individuals and their life course learning at its core. A new cross-border1 policy initiative from the island of Ireland illustrates the potential for SEP to contribute to PA/public health agendas.
    Sport Education and Society 10/2014; 19(7).
  • Sport Education and Society 10/2014; 19(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper centres on research that investigated the contemporary policy, curriculum and pedagogical landscape of Health and Physical Education (HPE) in Aotearoa New Zealand, in the light of increasing impressions that provision was moving to an ‘open market’ situation. Publicly available information sourced via the Internet was used to examine the public and privately funded initiatives, programmes and resources targeted towards the provision of HPE across all phases of education. The data arising revealed an array of government and non-governmental agencies and organisations acting as producers of resources and deliverers of HPE-related programmes in schools. It also clearly pointed to structural convergence between government and non-government sectors. This paper locates the findings from the research amidst developments in policy relations and networks spanning education, health and sport, and presents a theoretically oriented critical reexamination of the structural reconfiguration of contemporary HPE in Aotearoa New Zealand. Analysis brings together insights from Ball and Junemann’s work on policy networks and Bernstein’s theorising of the social construction of discourse to explore linkages between policy and pedagogic relations, and the discourses and practices in HPE. Attention is directed to the significance of changes in the nature of both the Official Recontextualizing Field and Pedagogic Recontextualizing field, and the connections between the two fields. Changes in the recontextualizing fields are discussed in relation to official pedagogic discourse of HPE and the pedagogic discourse of reproduction. This analysis brings to the fore prospective curriculum and pedagogic implications of new policy networks and new networks of providers associated with provision of HPE in schools. Discussion acknowledges potentially varied readings of contemporary developments and addresses the opportunities and challenges for teachers and teacher educators in Aotearoa New Zealand and internationally.
    Sport Education and Society 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A feature of academic literature on physical education teacher education (PETE) is the expectation that it can and should impact upon student teachers' beliefs and prospective practices in some significant ways. This is despite research over the last 20 years or more alluding to the apparent failure of PETE to ‘shake or stir’ (Evans et al., 1996) what might be termed the (typically conservative and conventional) pre-dispositions of student and early career PE teachers. In this article, we examine the perceptions of PE student teachers in Norway in order to ascertain just what it is that makes them so resistant to change and, for that matter, such infertile ground for sowing the seeds of reflexivity. The study involved semi-structured interviews with 41 PE student teachers from the three routes through teacher education available at Nord University College (Nord UC). Among the main themes identified in the data were the PE students' perceptions of: the purposes (and ostensible benefits) of school PE and PETE as well as the nature of PETE itself (including subsidiary themes of sporting and teaching skills, other ‘competencies’, school placements, mentoring and mentors, PETEs' (physical education teacher educators) teaching styles and the students teachers' relationships with the PETEs). The article concludes that, as far as the students at Nord UC were concerned, the significance of PETE revolved around the programme's efficacy in developing the sporting skills and teaching techniques they viewed as central to their preparation for teaching. The minimal impact of the more theoretical aspects of PETE appeared to be partly attributable to the students' perceptions of PE as synonymous with sport in schools and partly to their particularly pragmatic orientations towards PETE. In this vein, the students viewed experience as the most important, most legitimate ‘evidence’ on which to base their beliefs and practices and were resistant to the ‘theory’ of teacher education, rationalising their tendencies to select the evidence that suited them.
    Sport Education and Society 08/2014; 19(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A grand convergence looms. It seems at least plausible that health and physical education may soon be lived by students in ways that are radically different from the past and sharply at odds with the imaginings of its founders and generations of academic aficionados. Perhaps in some respects, the differences will be superficial and less important than the continuities. Nonetheless, I draw connections between some recent futurist literature, developments in social theory and trends in health education, physical education and school-based health intervention—fields that I collectively call ‘HPE’—in order to imagine their digital futures. I contend that there is much for these fields to consider as developments in digital technology, the commercialisation of education, the spread of surveillance culture and medicalisation reshape how people think about HPE and its reason for being. But rather than an apocalyptic warning, this is an invitation to others to engage with some important questions that, although already urgent, have gone largely unnoticed. For example, what kind of thing will eHPE be if/when it exists primarily to generate profits and monitor and measure the minutiae of everyday life? At the very least, my argument here is that if it is not already the case, questions of pedagogical process and effectiveness may soon struggle for relevance in HPE's digital future.
    Sport Education and Society 08/2014; 19(6).
  • Sport Education and Society 08/2014; 19(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper is based on analyses of ideas about girls and boys in sports as they are presented in textbooks used in coaching education programmes in Sweden. Specifically, it explores gender in relation to descriptions of girls' and boys' bodies and bodily development during puberty. Texts construct gender differences. Masculinity is shaped around being an athlete with a functional, naturally athletic body. Femininities are shaped in relation to the female specific body and in contrast to the male athletic body. Descriptions of girls' bodies and physical development emphasize problems that girls are expected to experience during the pubescent period. Gender theory and discourse analysis are used in the study. Ideas about gender are exemplified as well as how these ideas are presented by the use of different discourse types, genres and styles in the texts.
    Sport Education and Society 08/2014; 19(6).
  • Sport Education and Society 08/2014; 19(6).