The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology (INT J BIOCHEM CELL B)

Publisher: Elsevier

Journal description

The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology publishes papers containing the results of original research in all areas of contemporary biochemistry. This includes biochemical studies employing techniques of cell and molecular biology and all areas of biomedical research. The journal also contains a regular series of up-to-the-minute reviews highlighting major developments in modern biochemistry written by internationally renowned experts in the field. Because of the breadth of subjects covered by the journal, the aim and significance of every study should be made clear to readers who are not expert in the subject of the paper. New to the journal is a section entitled 'Molecules in Focus' which each month will publish an article focusing on a topical molecule and highlighting its potential industrial and/or pharmaceutical applications.

Current impact factor: 4.24

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 4.24
2012 Impact Factor 4.152
2011 Impact Factor 4.634
2010 Impact Factor 4.956
2009 Impact Factor 4.887
2008 Impact Factor 4.178
2007 Impact Factor 4.009
2006 Impact Factor 4.804
2005 Impact Factor 3.871
2004 Impact Factor 3.578
2003 Impact Factor 3.571
2002 Impact Factor 3.044
2001 Impact Factor 3.258
2000 Impact Factor 2.91
1999 Impact Factor 2.556
1998 Impact Factor 1.585
1997 Impact Factor 1.229
1996 Impact Factor 1.124
1995 Impact Factor 1.059

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 4.91
Cited half-life 5.90
Immediacy index 0.63
Eigenfactor 0.04
Article influence 1.65
Website International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology, The website
Other titles International journal of biochemistry & cell biology (Online), International journal of biochemistry and cell biology, Int. j. biochem. cell biol
ISSN 1357-2725
OCLC 39284324
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Insufficient and/or improper protein degradation is associated with the development of various human pathologies. Enzymatic therapy with proteolytic enzymes aimed to improve insufficient proteolytic activity was suggested as a treatment of protease deficiency-induced disorders. Since in many cases human degradome is incapable of degrading the entire target protein(s), other organisms can be used as a source of proteases exhibiting activities distinct from human enzymes, and plants are perspective candidates for this source. In this study recombinant wheat cysteine protease Triticain-α was shown to refold in vitro into an autocatalytically activated proteolytic enzyme possessing glutenase and collagenase activities at acidic (or close to neutral) pH levels at the temperature of human body. Mass-spectrometry analysis of the products of Triticain-α-catalyzed gluten hydrolysis revealed multiple cleavage sites within the sequences of gliadin toxic peptides, in particular, in the major toxic 33-mer α-gliadin-derived peptide initiating inflammatory responses to gluten in celiac disease (CD) patients. Triticain-α was found to be relatively stable in the conditions simulating stomach environment. We conclude that Triticain-α can be exploited as a basic compound for development of (i) pharmaceuticals for oral administration aimed at release of the active enzyme into the gastric lumen for CD treatment, and (ii) topically active pharmaceuticals for wound debridement applications.
    The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 03/2015; 62:115-224.
  • Source
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    ABSTRACT: The establishment and maintenance of epithelial polarity must be correctly controlled for normal development and homeostasis. Tight Junctions (TJ) in vertebrates define apical and basolateral membrane domains in polarized epithelia via bi-directional, complex signalling pathways between TJ themselves and the cytoskeleton they are associated with. RhoGTPases are central to these processes and evidence suggests that their regulation is coordinated by interactions between GEFs and GAPs with junctional, cytoplasmic adapter proteins. In this InFocus review we determine that the expression, localization or stability of a variety of these adaptor proteins is altered in various cancers, potentially representing an important mechanistic link between loss of polarity and cancer. We focus here, on two well characterized RhoGTPases Cdc42 and RhoA who's GEFs and GAPs are predominantly localized to TJ via cytoplasmic adaptor proteins. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 03/2015; 8. DOI:10.1016/j.biocel.2015.02.020
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Insufficient and/or improper protein degradation is associated with the development of various human pathologies. Enzymatic therapy with proteolytic enzymes aimed to improve insufficient proteolytic activity was suggested as a treatment of protease deficiency-induced disorders. Since in many cases human degradome is incapable of degrading the entire target protein(s), other organisms can be used as a source of proteases exhibiting activities distinct from human enzymes, and plants are perspective candidates for this source. In this study recombinant wheat cysteine protease Triticain-α was shown to refold in vitro into an autocatalytically activated proteolytic enzyme possessing glutenase and collagenase activities at acidic (or close to neutral) pH levels at the temperature of human body. Mass-specrometry analysis of the products of Triticain-α-catalyzed gluten hydrolysis revealed multiple cleavage sites within the sequences of gliadin toxic peptides, in particular, in the major toxic 33-mer α-gliadin-derived peptide initiating inflammatory responses to gluten in Celiac Disease (CD) patients. Triticain-α was found to be relatively stable in the conditions simulating stomach environment. We conclude that Triticain-α can be exploited as a basic compound for development of (i) pharmaceuticals for oral administration aimed at release of the active enzyme into the gastric lumen for CD treatment, and (ii) topically active pharmaceuticals for wound debridement applications. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 03/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.biocel.2015.03.001
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    ABSTRACT: Polo-like kinases (PLKs) family has long been known to be critical for cell cycle and recent studies have pointed to new dimensions of PLKs function in the nervous system. Our previous study has verified that the levels of PLK3 in the brain are severely down-regulated in prion-related diseases. However, the associations of PLKs with prion protein remain unclear. In the present study, we confirmed that PrP protein constitutively interacts with PLK3 as determined by both in vitro and in vivo assays. Both the kinase domain and polo-box domain of PLK3 were proved to bind PrP proteins expressed in mammalian cell lines. Overexpression of PLK3 did not affect the level of wild-type PrP, but significantly decreased the levels of the mutated PrPs in cultured cells. The kinase domain appeared to be responsible for the clearance of abnormally aggregated PrPs, but this function seemed to be independent of its kinase activity. RNA-mediated knockdown of PLK3 obviously aggravated the accumulation of cytosolic PrP. Moreover, PLK3-overexpression in a scrapie infected cell line caused notable reduce of PrP(Sc) level in a dose-dependent manner, but had minimal effect on the expression of PrP(C) in its normal partner cell line. Our findings here confirmed the molecular interaction between PLK3 and PrP and outlined the regulatory activity of PLK3 on the degradation of abnormal PrPs, even its pathogenic isoform PrP(Sc). We therefore assume that the recovery of PLK3 in the early-stage of prion infection may be helpful to prevent the toxic accumulation of PrP(Sc) in the brain tissues. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 02/2015; 62. DOI:10.1016/j.biocel.2015.02.011
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    ABSTRACT: Hypertension can increase mechanical stretch on the vessel wall, an important stimulus that induces collagen remodeling. Prolyl-4-hydroxylaseα1 (P4Hα1) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are essential for collagen synthesis and degradation. However, the effect of mechanical strain and collagen synthesis remains largely unknown. This study aimed to identify the effect of stretch on MMPs and P4Hα1 and the involved signaling pathways. Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) were stimulated with mechanical stretch (0, 10% and 18% strain), and production of P4Hα1 as well as production and gelatinolytic activity of MMP-2 was force-dependently increased. Mechanical stretch at 18% also increased the expression of type I and III collagen and the phosphorylation of Akt, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). MMP-2 production and activity enhanced by 18% stretch were inhibited by the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002. Blockade of p38 MAPK or JNK inhibited the promoting effect of stretch on P4Hα1. The in vivo model of aortic banding showed increased protein levels of MMP-2, P4Hα1 and collagen I and III in the aorta. Thus, mechanical stretch increased MMP-2 and P4Hα1 expression in HASMCs via AKT-P38 MAPK-JNK signaling, thereby inducing vascular remodeling. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 02/2015; 62. DOI:10.1016/j.biocel.2015.02.009
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    ABSTRACT: Recent evidence has indicated that miRNAs play important roles in carcinogenesis. The identification of dysregulated miRNAs and the target genes they regulate might enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A microarray analysis was performed to identify dysregulated miRNAs in NPC tissue samples, and protein-coding genes targeted by three or more downregulated miRNAs were selected using miRWalk and used in a pathway enrichment analysis. Nineteen KEGG pathways were selected by DAVID, including the MAPK, focal adhesion, gap junction, ECM-receptor interaction, TGF-beta, and p53 signalling pathways, most of which are involved in NPC carcinogenesis and progression. MiR-143 was significantly downregulated in NPC cell lines and clinical samples. The ectopic expression of miR-143 suppressed NPC cell viability, colony formation, and anchorage-independent growth in vitro, and it inhibited xenograft tumour growth in vivo. Furthermore, KRAS was confirmed as a direct target of miR-143, and silencing KRAS expression suppressed NPC cell viability and proliferation. The miR-143/KRAS pathway provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate the development and progression of NPC, and it provides novel therapeutic targets for NPC. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.biocel.2015.02.006
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    ABSTRACT: Heat shock proteins, many of which function as molecular chaperones, play important roles in the lifecycle and pathogenesis of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The P. falciparum heat shock protein 70 (PfHsp70) family of chaperones is potentially regulated by a large complement of J proteins that localize to various intracellular compartments including the infected erythrocyte cytosol. While PfHsp70-1 has been shown to be an abundant cytosolic chaperone, its regulation by J proteins is poorly understood. In this study, we characterized the J protein PFB0595w, a homologue of the well-studied yeast cytosolic J protein, Sis1. PFB0595w, similarly to PfHsp70-1, was localized to the parasite cytosol and its expression was upregulated by heat shock. Additionally, recombinant PFB0595w was shown to be dimeric and to stimulate the in vitro ATPase activity of PfHsp70-1. Overall, the expression, localization and biochemical data for PFB0595w suggest that it may function as a cochaperone of PfHsp70-1, and advances current knowledge on the chaperone machinery of the parasite. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 02/2015; 62. DOI:10.1016/j.biocel.2015.02.008
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    ABSTRACT: Inherited Retinal Dystrophies (IRDs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare disorders characterized by a significant impairment in retinal function and vision. More than 150 genes have been associated with retinal dystrophies and the genetic overlap among different IRDs renders diagnosis and prognosis challenging. In this In Focus article, we give a summary on the pathogenic role of gene expression regulators in IRDs. Emphasis is given on key transcription factors that participate to regulatory gene networks controlling photoreceptor specification and maintenance, and their possible relevance as therapeutic targets. The increasing knowledge on the composition and function of these transcriptional regulatory networks indicates that intervening on transcription factors may be instrumental for a more effective treatment of some forms of IRDs, although the development of appropriate molecular tools to target them remains a formidable challenge. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.biocel.2015.02.007
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    ABSTRACT: MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs regulating gene expression. In this study, we demonstrated that retinoic acid (RA) treatment increases the expression of miR-512-3p. Overexpression of miR-512-3p inhibited cell adhesion, migration, and invasion in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines A549 and H1299. miR-512-3p inhibitor partially reversed these effects in H1299 cells stably expressing miR-512. We identified DOCK3, a RAC1-GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor), as a target gene of miR-512-3p. Overexpression of miR-512-3p led to the decrease of DOCK3 protein but not its mRNA. Knockdown of DOCK3 resulted in similar effects on adhesion, migration, and invasion as observed of miR-512-3p overexpression. Active RAC1 pull-down assay indicated that overexpression of miR-512-3p could decrease the activity of RAC1 with a higher efficiency than that of DOCK3 knockdown. Furthermore, expression of miR-512-3p was suppressed in most NSCLC patient tumor samples compared to its paired normal controls, suggesting that miR-512-3p might play a crucial role in lung cancer development. In conclusion, our results supported that miR-512-3p could inhibit tumor cell adhesion, migration, and invasion by regulating the RAC1 activity via DOCK3 in NSCLC A549 and H1299 cell lines. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.biocel.2015.02.005
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    ABSTRACT: Excessive proliferation of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMC) is one of the major factors that trigger vascular remodeling in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Several studies have implicated that hypoxia inhibits the tumour suppressor p21 (CDKN1A). However, the precise mechanism is unknown. The mouse model of hypoxia-induced PH and in vitro experiments were used to assess the impact of microRNAs (miRNAs) on the expression of CDKN1A. In these experiments, the miRNA family miR-130 was identified to regulate the expression of CDKN1A. Transfection of HPASMC with miR-130 decreased the expression of CDKN1A and, in turn, significantly increased smooth muscle proliferation. Conversely, inhibition of miR-130 by anti-miRs and seed blockers increased the expression of CDKN1A. Reporter gene analysis proved a direct miR-130-CDKN1A target interaction. Exposure of HPASMC to hypoxia was found to induce the expression of miR-130 with concomitant decrease of CDKN1A. These findings were confirmed in the mouse model of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension showing that the use of seed blockers against miR-130 restored the expression of CDKN1A. These data suggest that miRNA family miR-130 plays an important role in the repression of CDKN1A by hypoxia. miR-130 enhances hypoxia-induced smooth muscle proliferation and might be involved in the development of right ventricular hypertrophy and vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 02/2015; 61. DOI:10.1016/j.biocel.2015.02.002
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    ABSTRACT: Protein kinase CK2 plays an essential role in cell viability in lower and higher eukaryotes. As a global regulator it phosphorylates and thereby regulates a broad array of cellular targets including a large number of transcription factors. Here, we have identified the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein δ (C/EBPδ) as a new substrate for CK2. Using point mutants of C/EBPδ the major phosphorylation site for CK2 was mapped to serine 57, which is located within the transactivation domain of C/EBPδ. For proper functioning as a transcription factor C/EBPδ has to be translocated into the nucleus where it forms heterodimers with other members of the C/EBP family of proteins and ATF4. Here, we found that CK2 phosphorylation does neither influence the subcellular localization of C/EBPδ nor its interaction with C/EBPβ, but rather does CK2 phosphorylation modulate the transcriptional activity of C/EBPδ. Moreover, we found that CK2 bound to C/EBPδ, which might help to target CK2 to the transcriptional machinery where it can phosphorylate other transcription factors or co-activators. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 02/2015; 61. DOI:10.1016/j.biocel.2015.02.004
  • The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.biocel.2015.01.019
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    ABSTRACT: For more than 50 years, reactive oxygen species have been considered as harmful agents, which can attack proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. In order to deal with reactive oxygen species, there is a sophisticated system developed in mitochondria to prevent possible damage. Indeed, increased reactive oxygen species levels contribute to pathomechanisms in several human diseases, either by its impaired defense system or increased production of reactive oxygen species. However, in the last two decades, the importance of reactive oxygen species in many cellular signaling pathways has been unraveled. Homeostatic levels were shown to be necessary for correct differentiation during embryonic expansion of stem cells. Although the mechanism is still not fully understood, we cannot only regard reactive oxygen species as a toxic by-product of mitochondrial respiration anymore.
    The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.biocel.2015.01.021
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    ABSTRACT: Phagocytosis, an evolutionarily conserved process in animals, plays a central role in host defense against pathogens. As reported, Rab6 GTPase was involved in the regulation of hemocytic phagocytosis in invertebrates. However, the role of Rab6 GTPase in mammalian phagocytosis remains to be addressed. In this study, the results showed that Rab6 GTPase took great effects on phagocytosis of mouse leukemic monocyte macrophages (RAW 264.7 cells). It was revealed that Rab6 GTPase was required during the phagosome maturation by its interaction with bicaudal-D1 (BICD1) protein. Further data presented that the Rab6 GTPase-regulated phagocytosis could influence the proliferation of Staphylococcus aureus in macrophages. Therefore, our study demonstrated a novel insight into the mechanism of regulation of mammalian phagocytosis by Rab6 GTPase and a novel strategy for the control of S. aureus. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 02/2015; 61. DOI:10.1016/j.biocel.2015.01.016