Teaching in Higher Education (TEACH HIGH EDUC )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

Teaching in Higher Education addresses the roles of teaching, learning and the curriculum in higher education in order to explore and clarify the intellectual challenges which they present. The journal is interdisciplinary and aims to open up discussion across subject areas by involving all those who share an enthusiasm for learning and teaching. In particular the journal: Critically examines the values and presuppositions underpinning teaching Identifies new agendas for research Introduces comparative perspectives and insights drawn from different cultures Aims to apply and develop sustained reflection, investigation and critique to learning and teaching in higher education Considers how teaching and research can be brought into closer relationship and how teaching in higher education can itself become a field of research.

  • Impact factor
    0.76
  • 5-year impact
    0.93
  • Cited half-life
    6.10
  • Immediacy index
    0.09
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.34
  • Website
    Teaching in Higher Education website
  • Other titles
    Teaching in higher education (Online)
  • ISSN
    1356-2517
  • OCLC
    45007367
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Self-assessment at tertiary level is a critical pedagogical and assessment tool to support students in their transition to professional careers where on-going learning and assessment is required. Beyond the safety-net of course content, external assessment and pre-determined criteria, novice professionals need to find ways to self-assess their on-going learning outside of credentialing environments. Self-assessment involves students' critical reflection on their knowledge, understanding and application of skills towards an activity, and is associated with goal setting. It supports learners to ‘know thyself’ in establishing their role and identity as a professional, encourages a deeper approach to learning and is a powerful means to develop their ontological sense of professional self. This paper analyses the role of self-assessment in a professional programme within an education faculty, and explores how students can utilise their understanding of course content as a means to develop their reflective practice to inform their professional self.
    Teaching in Higher Education 11/2014; 19(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Concerns about the ability of post-secondary students to read scholarly materials are well documented in the literature. A key aspect of reading at the deeper level expected of these students is connecting new information to prior knowledge. This study is based on an activity where students were explicitly required to make such connections as part of an in-class workshop on reading. Phenomenographic analysis of these connections showed that students could establish links between the scholarly article and their personal and academic knowledge. It also showed that students read at both surface and deep levels, making connections to the words in the text or on a deeper level, to the meaning of the text. These insights suggest ways of encouraging students to deepen their engagement with academic texts.
    Teaching in Higher Education 11/2014; 19(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In response to widespread support for mentoring schemes in higher education this article calls for a more critical investigation of the dynamics of power and control, which are intrinsic to the mentoring process, and questions presumptions that mentoring brings only positive benefits to its participants. It provides this more critical appraisal by using evidence from a mentoring project at one university in the UK. Attention is drawn to three keys issues: first, to the highly formalised nature of the mentoring project; second, to the extent to which the project socialises mentees to ‘fit in’ to university life; and third, to tensions in the mentoring relationship which centre on academic skills development. Together these issues allow the beginning of a more critical interpretation of how mentoring operates as a form of institutional control, as well as opening up, for scrutiny, some of mentoring's often taken-for-granted positive effects.
    Teaching in Higher Education 11/2014; 19(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: According to Michel Foucault, modernity is predicated on the emergence of an instrumental idea of knowledge, which does not affect the constitution of the individual as a subject. This article aims to explore this thesis in the context of British Higher Education through a problematization of widening participation policies, and how they have been increasingly constructed in economic-instrumental terms. This approach suggests two main considerations within the framework of Foucault's argument. First, widening participation initiatives have contributed to reinforce an idea of knowledge as an instrumental set of notions external to the subject rather than a process of transformation of the self. Second, widening participation initiatives have been dominated by a neoliberal approach to the problem of inequality which has turned students into seemingly equal consumers of knowledge. However, it will be argued, this approach contributes to reproduce in different ways the inequality gap between students of different socioeconomic backgrounds.
    Teaching in Higher Education 11/2014; 19(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article examines the challenges experienced by Arabic-speaking students and lecturers at meeting the proposed learning outcomes in English Literature (EL) at a residential university in Algeria. An overview of the history of foreign languages (French and English) in the curricula in Algerian schools and tertiary education institutions has been provided to identify possible contributing factors and underlying causes of the challenges faced in teaching and learning EL today. The authors believe that current practice and attitudes towards foreign language teaching and learning have not developed in a vacuum, but need to be positioned within the context of past events. Three overarching factors that emerged from the empirical dimension of the study that appears to inhibit success in EL studies were inappropriate teaching strategies, inadequate language proficiency and poor student self-efficacy.
    Teaching in Higher Education 11/2014; 19(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: While building a strong research profile is usually seen as key for those seeking a traditional academic position, teaching is also understood as central to academic practice. Still, we know little of how post-Ph.D. researchers seeking academic posts locate teaching and supervision in their academic practice, nor how their views may shift as they are hired into such positions. Drawing on a framework of identity-trajectory narrative, this two-year study of seven Canadian post-Ph.D. scientists examines in-depth the shifting place of teaching within their academic practice. A positive view of the role of teaching in the post-Ph.D. position evolved to a more complex positioning as individuals became pre-tenure. The contributions of this study include a focus on early career scientists (much previous research examines social scientists); its rare longitudinal reach following individuals across roles; and its integration of teaching within other academic work.
    Teaching in Higher Education 11/2014; 19(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study contributes to research linking diversity and higher education teaching to democratic learning outcomes. It explores processes and outcomes associated with the intergroup contact of Black and White students enrolled in two sections of a diversity education course at a public university in the southeastern United States. The goals of this study were: (1) to explore the intergroup dynamics that emerged when students interacted in both sections of the course; and (2) to identify student support for intergroup cooperation as a result of their experiences in the course. While one section of the course experienced a high degree of intergroup conflict, students in both sections reported support for intergroup cooperation at the end of the course.
    Teaching in Higher Education 11/2014; 19(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article considers how course design accommodates the adaptation of L2 students into the early stages of the master's dissertation (Social Sciences and Humanities) at a UK university. I present a contrastive process-oriented analysis of two students' experiences on different courses, extracted from a 13-month ethnographic study in which students' self-reports (journals; interviews) were triangulated with their assignments, interviews with lecturers and classroom observation. I identify two ‘literacy events’ in the early stages: discussing the topic and preparing the proposal. In order to make visible these events, I deploy Lave and Wenger's Community of Practice model, while taking a post-structuralist view of learning as a dynamic between language, identities, power relations, affordances and agency. Findings show unequal support for these events on the two courses; I argue that this exemplifies significantly different ideologies relating to the accommodation of L2 students, and discuss implications for course design.
    Teaching in Higher Education 11/2014; 19(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper explores the emotional journey associated with changing one's teaching and learning practices and how this constitutes emotional work. The paper analyses the emotions evident in the data from a small-scale phenomenological study of lecturers who are using technological tools in their teaching, learning and assessment practices in one higher education institution. The discussion illuminates the nature and scale of the emotional work experienced by some lecturers when changing their teaching and learning practices to incorporate technology. It indicates that this challenge is so extreme that even the most committed advocates of online teaching practices may consider giving up and reverting to traditional ways of teaching. The paper identifies strategies that lecturers use to manage the anxieties they experience in their adoption of online tools.
    Teaching in Higher Education 11/2014; 19(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we report on how teachers in Higher Education enact policy. Outcome-based education (OBE) serves as an example of a governmental educational policy introduced with the European Bologna reform. With a hermeneutic approach, we have studied how 14 teachers interpreted this policy and re-designed their courses. The findings show teachers' enactment of policy framed as different approaches to OBE: container, technocratic, pragmatic or ideological. The approaches range from being (1) highly regulated to being autonomous; and (2) from having a teacher-centred orientation to having a student-centred orientation to teaching–learning. Teachers who reinterpreted the policy to fit their learning-centred orientation used it to facilitate a joint development process together with colleagues. Thus, policy may stimulate development of teaching–learning.
    Teaching in Higher Education 10/2014; 19(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we identify beliefs about teaching and patterns of instruction valued and emphasized by science, technology, engineering, and mathematics faculty in higher education in the USA. Drawing on the notion that effective teaching is student-centered rather than teacher-centered and must include a balance of knowledge-, learner-, community-, and assessment-centered learning environments; we use qualitative interview data to explore how faculty's reported beliefs about teaching are associated with their consideration of these four types of environments. Findings indicated that although a range of beliefs about teaching emerged, most were firmly located in knowledge-centered learning environments, with little or no focus on the remaining three learning environments. Furthermore, even patterns of instruction that were heavily student-centered were situated within a knowledge-centered learning framework. We argue that for student-centered instruction to be truly successful, faculty must consider all four learning environments in crafting and facilitating the classroom environment.
    Teaching in Higher Education 10/2014; 19(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this study the learning process of 12 Dutch novice university teachers was monitored during a five-month induction programme. The teachers were interviewed before and after the programme and were asked to fill in several email logbooks during the programme. A change process was identified, in which experiencing and experimentation played a central role. In particular, modelling by the teacher educator, the observation of video cases, reflection on these with peers and experiencing success in their own practice seemed to be important incentives that encouraged teachers to adopt and eventually implement new pedagogical approaches. On the basis of our data, we think that teachers' conceptions and teaching practice are best developed simultaneously and that the design of induction programmes should support this process.
    Teaching in Higher Education 10/2014; 19(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Teaching in university has been widely debated in the past few years. However, this issue should not be limited solely to psychological and pedagogical matters. This paper examines university teaching in terms of its relational and human dimension which, as we would expect, also has an important impact on learning and student development. The communitarian critique of the principles of liberalism stresses the importance of this dimension of the teaching task and raises questions that need to be addressed in order to ensure that a university continues to be a unique life experience and an important social institution.
    Teaching in Higher Education 10/2014; 19(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Research-intensive universities, such as the Russell Group in the UK, the Ivy League Colleges in the USA and the Sandstone Universities in Australia, enjoy particular status in the higher education landscape. They are, however, also often associated with social elitism and selectivity, and this has led to critique as higher education systems seek to widen access. This article looks at how academic staff are discursively constructed in five such institutions in South Africa through an analysis of documentation submitted as part of a national review. Three interrelated discourses are identified: a discourse of ‘staff as scholars’ whereby research is privileged over teaching, a discourse of ‘academic argumentation’ whereby a critical disposition is valued and is called upon by academics to resist development initiatives and a discourse of ‘trust’ whereby it is assumed that academics share a value system and should thus be trusted to undertake quality teaching without interference.
    Teaching in Higher Education 10/2014; 19(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study is to explore how students' experiences of enhancing and impeding factors and approaches to learning are related to students' study progress. A total of 93 students from the Faculty of Arts and Humanities participated in the study by answering a Learn-questionnaire regarding their experiences of the enhancing and impeding factors and their approaches to learning. Regression analysis showed that working impeded study progression whereas interesting teaching enhanced it. However, the results revealed that the factors that enhance or impede studying appear to be closely mediated by students' approaches to learning. For example, working was not problematic for students with good organising skills. The findings suggest that it may not be possible to identify the factors that would enhance or impede studying without taking individual differences into consideration. In addition, the results imply that the focus in teaching should be in developing students' self-regulation skills.
    Teaching in Higher Education 10/2014; 19(7).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study addresses the challenges concerning the internationalisation of higher education, with a particular focus on designing new international programmes. It presents a case study of a novel international study programme: the MA in Media Education at the Faculty of Education at the University of Lapland, Finland. The study looks into its curriculum as an affordance network and asks: How do the planned and experienced curricula respond to and support cultural inclusion? The results shed light on the risks of transforming existing domestic degree programmes into ‘international’ programmes. The core curriculum design challenges found in this study stem from the fact that the meaning of internationalisation has been defined ‘from within’; from the existing structures and expectations of the programme and the host institution. We suggest that more attention should be paid to students’ life-worlds and the entire multicultural ecosystem that builds on the affordances inscribed in the curriculum.
    Teaching in Higher Education 08/2014; in press.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Academic literacy practices can be alienating for new undergraduates, yet academic success depends on writing in ways that the academy deems acceptable and is related to the identity positions available to students. I describe an intervention in which aspects of academic practice were made visible and students participated collaboratively in academic writing in a first-year, first-semester, Education Studies module. Student-managed audio recordings show that, in contrast to much research evidence, students did not reject academic identities but rather used their talk to ‘tell themselves’ as academic. I discuss methodological and pedagogical implications arising from the findings and conclude that collaborative participation in academic practice and the associated talk require students to position themselves as participants in that practice and may be a way to reduce alienation and enable students to construct the self as ‘academic’.
    Teaching in Higher Education 05/2014; 19(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to analyze two certificate programs in regard to the impacts on alumni professional career and strengths and weaknesses of certificate programs in the views of their alumni. The sample consisted of 58 participants who completed one of the certificate programs. The results showed that alumni rated self-improvement as the biggest benefit, career advancement benefit as average, and career change benefit as low from the certificate programs. Also, alumni thought that all program components were of strong quality, but the majority of alumni still wanted to see an increased emphasis on teaching, interaction with other students, support, and assessment feedback focus of the program.
    Teaching in Higher Education 05/2014; 19(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper, I report my investigation of the use of metaphors in teaching theory in electronic engineering. I give a description of the nature of metaphors, how they are used in teaching the theory and some of the problems that might arise in the process. I investigate how some people react to the metaphors and how others forget the metaphors once they have learnt the theory. I suggest some reasons why this might happen.
    Teaching in Higher Education 05/2014; 19(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: As the USA experiences rapid growth of nontraditional adult students in higher education, educators and institutions will increasingly need to look beyond the traditional youth-centric educational models to better address adult learning needs. To date, no research has been conducted examining the learning experiences of adult students enrolled in a disciplinary course that was built upon core principles of adult learning. Ten adult students (mean age = 45.4 years), enrolled in an American university with a college dedicated to adult students, were interviewed to assess their learning experiences and felt impact after completing a psychology course created upon adult learning principles. Findings revealed that students progressed through a five-themed model that challenged their pre-existing meaning structures, caused emotional and cognitive disequilibrium, and pushed them toward irrevocable change.
    Teaching in Higher Education 05/2014; 19(4).

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