Microbes and Environments (MICROBES ENVIRON )

Publisher: Nihon Biseibutsu Seitai Gakkai

Description

Microbes and Environments is the publication of the Japanese Society of Microbial Ecology. The Journal is issued four times per year.

Impact factor 2.42

  • Hide impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    2.21
  • Cited half-life
    4.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.28
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.54
  • Website
    Microbes and Environments website
  • Other titles
    Microbes and environments (Online)
  • ISSN
    1342-6311
  • OCLC
    55752872
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 exhibited chemotactic responses to l-malate, succinate, and fumarate. We constructed a plasmid library of 37 methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP) genes of P. fluorescens Pf0-1. To identify a MCP for l-malate, the plasmid library was screened using the PA2652 mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, a mutant defective in chemotaxis to l-malate. The introduction of Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 genes restored the ability of the PA2652 mutant to respond to l-malate. The Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 double mutant of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 showed no response to l-malate or succinate, while the Pfl01_0728 single mutant did not respond to fumarate. These results indicated that Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 were the major MCPs for l-malate and succinate, and Pfl01_0728 was also a major MCP for fumarate. The Pfl01_0728 and Pfl01_3768 double mutant unexpectedly exhibited stronger responses toward the tomato root exudate and amino acids such as proline, asparagine, methionine, and phenylalanine than those of the wild-type strain. The ctaA, ctaB, ctaC (genes of the major MCPs for amino acids), Pfl01_0728, and Pfl01_3768 quintuple mutant of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 was less competitive than the ctaA ctaB ctaC triple mutant in competitive root colonization, suggesting that chemotaxis to l-malate, succinate, and/or fumarate was involved in tomato root colonization by P. fluorescens Pf0-1.
    Microbes and Environments 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Eukaryotic communities involved in sewage treatment processes have been investigated by morphological identification, but have not yet been well-characterized using molecular approaches. In the present study, eukaryotic communities were characterized by constructing 18S rRNA gene clone libraries. The phylogenetic affiliations of a total of 843 clones were Alveolata, Fungi, Rhizaria, Euglenozoa, Stramenopiles, Amoebozoa, and Viridiplantae as protozoans and Rotifera, Gastrotricha, and Nematoda as metazoans. Sixty percent of the clones had <97% sequence identity to described eukaryotes, indicating the greater diversity of eukaryotes than previously recognized. A core OTU closely related to Epistylis chrysemydis was identified, and several OTUs were shared by 4-8 libraries. Members of the uncultured lineage LKM11 in Cryptomycota were predominant fungi in sewage treatment processes. This comparative study represents an initial step in furthering understanding of the diversity and role of eukaryotes in sewage treatment processes.
    Microbes and Environments 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We recently reported that the overexpression of GroEL2 played an important role in increasing the alkane tolerance of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4. In the present study, we examined the effects of the introduction of groEL2 on the alkane tolerance of other Rhodococcus strains. The introduction of groEL2 into Rhodococcus strains led to increased alkane tolerance. The translocation of R. rhodochrous ATCC12674 cells to and survival in the n-octane (C8) phase in two phase culture were significantly enhanced by the introduction of groEL2 derived from strain PR4, suggesting that engineering cells to overexpress GroEL2 represents an effective strategy for enhancing organic solvent tolerance in Rhodococcus.
    Microbes and Environments 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Heat inactivation of viruses was reported, however, the thermal resistance of viruses in droplets has not been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pattern of heat resistance of minute virus of mice (MVM), coxsackievirus B4 (CVB4), influenza A virus (H1N1), and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) contained in droplets. Four µL droplets containing viruses (> 10(4.5) TCID50) were applied onto warmed surface obtained by using a self-made heating device. Viral suspensions were exposed to temperatures ranging from 70 to 130°C for 0 to 90 min depending on the virus, and then the recovered viral preparations were tittered. Inactivation rates were calculated from curves that were analysed according to the first order kinetics model. Full inactivation was obtained for MVM in 90 min at 80°C and in 2 s at 130°C, for H1N1 in 14 s at 70°C and in 1 s at 110°C, for CVB4 and HSV-1 in 5 s and 7 s respectively at 70°C and in 1 s at 100°C. Clearly, MVM was more resistant than H1N1 that was more resistant than HSV-1 and CVB4, which was reflected by increasing inactivation rates. The impact of short time exposure to heat onto the infectivity of viruses contained in a small volume of suspension has been determined. For the first time, the inactivation of viral particles contained in drops exposed to temperatures higher than 100°C has been investigated. It appears that heating can have an unexpected faster virucidal effect than previously described.
    Microbes and Environments 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The diversity and abundance of Burkholderia species in sugarcane field soils were investigated by a 16S rRNA gene-based approach using genus-specific primers. A total of 365,721 sequences generated by the Illumina MiSeq platform were assigned to the genus Burkholderia. Nearly 58% of these sequences were placed in a previously defined cluster, including stinkbug symbionts. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed a consistent number of 16S rRNA gene copies for Burkholderia species (10(7) g(-1) soil) across the sampled fields. C/N, pH, and nitrate concentrations were important factors shaping the Burkholderia community structure; however, their impacts were not significant considering the overall genus size.
    Microbes and Environments 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Concern regarding household biofilms has grown due to their widespread existence and potential to threaten human health by serving as pathogen reservoirs. Previous studies identified Methylobacterium as one of the dominant genera found in household biofilms. In the present study, we examined the mechanisms underlying biofilm formation by using the bacterial consortium found in household pink slime. A clone library analysis revealed that Methylobacterium was the predominant genus in household pink slime. In addition, 16 out of 21 pink-pigmented bacterial isolates were assigned to the genus Methylobacterium. Although all of the Methylobacterium isolates formed low-level biofilms, the amount of the biofilms formed by Methylobacterium sp. P-1M and P-18S was significantly increased by co-culturing with other Methylobacterium strains that belonged to a specific phylogenetic group. The single-species biofilm was easily washed from the glass surface, whereas the dual-species biofilm strongly adhered after washing. A confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis showed that the dual-species biofilms were significantly thicker and tighter than the single-species biofilms.
    Microbes and Environments 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We previously reported that R. erythropolis PR4 translocated from the aqueous to the alkane phase, and then grew in two phase cultures to which long-chain alkanes had been added. This was considered to be beneficial for bioremediation. In the present study, we investigated the proteins involved in the translocation of R. erythropolis PR4. The results of our proteogenomic analysis suggested that GroEL2 was upregulated more in cells that translocated inside of the pristane (C19) phase than in those located at the aqueous-alkane interface attached to the n-dodecane (C12) surface. PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) and PR4 (pK4-ΔEL2-1) strains were constructed to confirm the effects of the upregulation of GroEL2 in translocated cells. The expression of GroEL2 in PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) was 15.5-fold higher than that in PR4 (pK4-ΔEL2-1) in two phase cultures containing C12. The growth and cell surface lipophilicity of PR4 were enhanced by the introduction of pK4-EL2-1. These results suggested that the plasmid overexpression of groEL2 in PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) led to changes in cell localization, enhanced growth, and increased cell surface lipophilicity. Thus, we concluded that the overexpression of GroEL2 may play an important role in increasing the organic solvent tolerance of R. erythropolis PR4 in aqueous-alkane two phase cultures.
    Microbes and Environments 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to identify bacteria that may contribute to the onset of metabolic dysfunctions. We isolated and identified a candidate bacterium belonging to Lachnospiraceae (strain AJ110941) in the feces of hyperglycemic obese mice. The colonization of germ-free ob/ob mice by AJ110941 induced significant increases in fasting blood glucose levels as well as liver and mesenteric adipose tissue weights, and decreases in plasma insulin levels and HOMA-β values. These results indicated that the specific gut commensal bacterium AJ110941 influenced the development of obesity and diabetes in ob/ob mice with genetic susceptibility for obesity.
    Microbes and Environments 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The microbial monitoring of drinking water production systems is essential to assure water quality and minimize possible risks. However, the comparative impact of microbes from the surrounding aquifer and of those established within drinking water wells on water parameters remains poorly understood. High pressure jetting is a routine method to impede well clogging by fine sediments and also biofilms. In the present study, bacterial communities were investigated in a drinking water production system before, during, and after hydraulic purging. Variations were observed in bacterial communities between different wells of the same production system before maintenance, despite them having practically identical water chemistries. This may have reflected the distinct usage practices of the different wells, and also local aquifer heterogeneity. Hydraulic jetting of one well preferentially purged a subset of the dominating taxa, including lineages related to Diaphorobacter, Nitrospira, Sphingobium, Ralstonia, Alkanindiges, Janthinobacterium, and Pseudomonas spp, suggesting their tendency for growth in well-associated biofilms. Lineages of potential drinking water concern (i.e. Legionellaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Acinetobacter spp.) reacted distinctly to hydraulic jetting. Bacterial diversity was markedly reduced in drinking water 2 weeks after the cleaning procedure. The results of the present study provide a better understanding of drinking water wells as a microbial habitat, as well as their role in the microbiology of drinking water systems.
    Microbes and Environments 10/2014;