Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia (Health Inform Manag )

Publisher: Health Information Management Association of Australia

Description

  • Impact factor
    0.62
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    2.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Other titles
    HIMJ, Health information management journal, Health information management
  • ISSN
    1322-4913
  • OCLC
    56362223
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 01/2011; 28(1):31.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):185.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):150-5.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):174-8.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this paper is to present a profile and comparison of demographic, educational and work characteristics of health information managers working in public hospitals in New South Wales and Victoria. A cross-sectional survey was designed to collect data from a sample of 141 health information managers (HIMs) from 41 NSW public hospitals and 165 HIMs from 30 Victorian public hospitals. Before analysis the data were split into responses from 'managerial HIMs' and 'coder HIMs' to reflect the differences in their respective roles. The results showed that public hospital HIMs are predominantly female, young and mobile. Differences in employment and education between managerial and coder HIMs are presented, as are significant differences between public hospital HIMs in NSW and Victoria. Casemix-based funding and computerisation of clinical information are considered to be the main drivers of change to the role of the HIM.
    Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):162-7.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):174-8.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):169-71.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):185.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):189-91.
  • Source
    Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):186-8.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Database administration is one of those professions that makes it hard to explain to others what you do for a living. We typically fit in between the people who build servers and the people who need to store and retrieve data from those same servers. We are therefore expected to know and understand a lot about a lot, and it can be overwhelming at times. So much so that you will sometimes stop to take a moment to reflect upon where you are in life and wonder, “How did I get here?”
    Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):186-8.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this paper is to present the results of a survey of Australian health information management students relating to their career aspirations and expectations and anticipated involvement in professional activities following graduation. To explain reasons for the differences in results between states and student years, interviews were conducted with academic staff and other health information management educators. Three hundred and sixty three students completed the questionnaire in 1996, which represented a response rate of 86%. It was found that the majority of students thought they had made the correct career choice and were confident they would find full-time employment within six months of graduation. A high percentage of students also indicated that they would undertake continuing education after graduation. There was less support for involvement in the activities of their professional association, particularly at a national level. Students in New South Wales and Queensland indicated that they would be significantly less likely to work in the field of health information management for the rest of their careers. They also reported they would be significantly less likely to conduct research in an area related to health information management. Victorian students were significantly more likely to present a paper at a conference than students from Queensland, New South Wales or Western Australia. Western Australian students were significantly more likely to report that they would undertake postgraduate studies compared to students from the other three states.
    Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):156-61.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):182-4.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):169-71.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):189-91.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):172-4.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):147-50.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 02/2000; 29(4):182-4.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 01/2000; 29(3):130-1.
  • Health information management: journal of the Health Information Management Association of Australia 01/2000; 29(3):126-7.

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