Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape (EPILEPTIC DISORD)

Publisher: John Libbey Eurotext

Journal description

The first epilepsy journal to include a CD-Rom. Epileptic Disorders publishes articles concerned with the clinical manifestations of epilepsy, but with all aspects of the diagnosis, natural history and management of seizure disorders including neurophysiological, imaging and other ancillary techniques. A major feature of the journal is the video-sequences available on a CD-Rom supplement included with each issue of the journal. The online version of Epileptic Disorders is now available. It gives you access to all the journal's archives either by pay per view or by subscription. Epileptic Disorders is already indexed in Current Contents and Medline.

Current impact factor: 0.90

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 0.899
2012 Impact Factor 1.165
2011 Impact Factor 1.495
2010 Impact Factor 1.092
2009 Impact Factor 1.198
2008 Impact Factor 1.068
2007 Impact Factor 0.919
2006 Impact Factor 1.202
2005 Impact Factor 1.074
2004 Impact Factor 1.118
2003 Impact Factor 0.804
2002 Impact Factor 0.81
2001 Impact Factor 0.8
2000 Impact Factor 0.5
1999 Impact Factor

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.34
Cited half-life 6.40
Immediacy index 0.06
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.46
Website Epileptic Disorders website
Other titles Epileptic disorders
ISSN 1294-9361
OCLC 43206751
Material type Periodical, Videorecording
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Visual material

Publisher details

John Libbey Eurotext

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On author's personal website, institutional website, institutional server or institutional repository
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 03/2015; DOI:10.1684/epd.2015.0735
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    ABSTRACT: Ictal vocalizations in the form of both articulate speech and non-speech vocalizations have been described in focal epilepsies, with seizures originating mainly from the frontal and temporal lobe, however, this phenomenon has not been described in generalized epilepsies. We report the case of an adolescent boy with juvenile-onset generalized epilepsy who presented with ictal "ovine vocalizations" (resembling the bleating of sheep). The ictal EEG revealed a clear correlate of vocalizations with time-locked generalized spikes and polyspike discharges. The 3T cerebral MRI ruled out any focal lesion. The boy is currently seizure-free under valproic acid, after twelve months of follow-up. We conclude that ictal non-speech vocalizations may be observed not only in focal or structural epilepsies, but also in generalized epilepsies; the exact underlying mechanism of this phenomenon needs to be further delineated. [Published with video sequence].
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 02/2015; DOI:10.1684/epd.2015.0727
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    ABSTRACT: Seizures are the most common sign of neurological dysfunction in full-term neonates, with an incidence estimated at 0.15-3.5/1,000 live births. Neonatal seizures often reflect severe underlying brain injury and are associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. Prognosis is primarily determined by the nature, site and extent of the underlying aetiology, making accurate diagnosis and identification of associated brain lesions essential. Data on neuroimaging in newborns presenting with seizures is limited and most studies report on MRI findings in infants with a specific underlying problem, such as hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, stroke or metabolic disorders. The aim of this review is to discuss the spectrum of neuroimaging findings in full-term newborns presenting with seizures, divided into subgroups with different underlying aetiologies. A standard neonatal MRI protocol is presented.
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 02/2015; DOI:10.1684/epd.2015.0730
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    ABSTRACT: Clinicians trained to interpret EEG in Africa are scarce. The region is challenged by inadequate access to healthcare professionals and a significant burden of disease, with the result that trained neurophysiologists and epileptologists may not be viewed as an immediate priority. However, approaches, specific to the African context, could be adopted to enable safe practice of basic EEG interpretation. Educational guidelines for the interpretation of paediatric studies, relevant to the region, are lacking. As a result, a handbook targeting this training need was developed and a pilot study undertaken to assess the efficacy of this tool to improve EEG-reporting skills for clinicians at a basic level. Eleven health practitioners, who manage children with epilepsy, from various African countries, were recruited. The group analysed selected EEGs before and after reading a training manual (the handbook). A survey was conducted on how useful the participants found the handbook. There was a trend (p<0.06) supporting improvement in the ability to analyse EEGs following reading of the handbook. The doctors who had one-on-one tutoring, in addition to access to the handbook, did significantly better in most EEG-reporting variables (p<0.01). The handbook was found to be a viable tool to promote EEG interpretation in the African setting, where foundation skills are needed. However, optimal outcomes were evident with additional individual tutoring, as well as on-going support to maintain skills. This curriculum will be adapted into a post-graduate qualification intended to generate clinicians with key basic EEG skills, but not fully trained electrophysiologists. Currently, in the African setting, for maximum impact on patient care, this approach is considered the most likely to have the furthest reach.
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 02/2015; DOI:10.1684/epd.2015.0729
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    ABSTRACT: Epilepsy surgery is a well-accepted treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy. The success of the epilepsy surgery depends upon an appropriate presurgical evaluation process which should ensure the selection of suitable patients who are likely to become seizure-free following surgery without any unacceptable deficit. The two basic goals of the presurgical evaluation are the accurate localization and delineation of the extent of the epileptogenic zone, and its complete and safe resection. The process of the presurgical evaluation requires a multimodality approach wherein each modality provides unique and complimentary information which is combined with the information provided by other modalities to generate a hypothesis with regard to the likely epileptogenic zone. The basic modalities for the presurgical evaluation are clinical history, long-term video-EEG recording, high-resolution MRI, and neuropsychological evaluation. The additional modalities include functional imaging studies, electrical and magnetic source imaging, functional MRI, and intracranial monitoring. Each modality has its own limitations and the information provided by none of them is absolute. Hence, a concordance among the different modalities is the key to surgical success. The presurgical evaluation is a step-wise process starting form the most basic and most reliable tests and progressing to more complex and invasive modalities. The number of tests required varies according to the complexity involved and may include very basic minimum investigations in a given case, to the use of all the available investigations in more complex cases. The proper selection of various investigations and their accurate interpretation at each stage is required to ensure a successful outcome. In this article, we intend to review some of these basic concepts of presurgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery, and try to provide a frame work of the presurgical evaluation process.
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 02/2015; DOI:10.1684/epd.2014.0720
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    ABSTRACT: Although adrenocorticotropic hormone is the most commonly used treatment for infantile spasms in the United States, the optimal regimen for this indication is not known. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the optimal adrenocorticotropic hormone treatment duration. We conducted a retrospective chart review of response to adrenocorticotropic hormone among all patients with infantile spasms managed at our institution from January 2009 to September 2013. Treatment response was defined as clinical remission for greater than or equal to 28 days starting at any point within the adrenocorticotropic hormone course and remission of hypsarrhythmia (or definite EEG improvement if hypsarrhythmia was absent at baseline). For responders, the diagnostic and post-treatment EEG tracings were reviewed. Electroclinical remission was achieved in 21 of 39 patients (54%) receiving adrenocorticotropic hormone, including 11/25 (44%) receiving a long course (typically 12 weeks) and 10/14 (71%) receiving a short course (typically four weeks). The mean time to clinical remission was 5.8 days (median: 5 days; range: 1-20 days). Only one patient responded beyond two weeks of treatment. This study provides Class IV evidence that among patients with infantile spasms, the response to adrenocorticotropic hormone is most often determined early in the treatment course. Given the importance of rapid remission, clinicians should consider adding or changing treatment if infantile spasms do not resolve within two weeks of adrenocorticotropic hormone initiation. Further study is needed to determine the optimal adrenocorticotropic hormone regimen for infantile spasms.
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 02/2015; DOI:10.1684/epd.2014.0723
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    ABSTRACT: Myoclonic status epilepticus or mixed absence-myoclonic status is uncommon in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), often precipitated by sleep deprivation, withdrawal of medication, or inadequate antiepileptic drugs (Thomas et al., 2006; Crespel et al., 2013). Such episodes respond well to benzodiazepines or valproate ( Crespel et al., 2013 ). We present the video-EEG of a 24-year-old woman with JME and bipolar disorder. She had a confusional state five days after withdrawal of clonazepam (14 mg/d) and introduction of oxazepam (200 mg/d), followed by catatonic stupor with subtle myoclonus of the face and the arms. The EEG showed absence status (figures 1, 2), which stopped after IV injection of clonazepam (1 mg) (figure 3). Consciousness returned to normal [Published with video sequences and figures].
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 02/2015; DOI:10.1684/epd.2014.0719
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    ABSTRACT: Aim. In drug-responsive epilepsy patients, treatment non-compliance is a major factor in seizure recurrence, but adherence to prescribed regimens following epilepsy surgery has not been examined. We measured adherence to prescribed antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) after epilepsy surgery and investigated factors influencing treatment non-compliance. Methods. Postsurgical epilepsy patients (n=214) were monitored for 18.1±8.1 months. Adherence was measured using the Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) self-report questionnaire, with MPR<0.8 defined as non-adherence. Results. According to the MPR, 58 patients (27.1%) were non-adherent after surgery. There were no differences in demographic and clinical variables, such as age (p=0.057, t =-1.925), duration of illness (p=0.597, t=0.530), gender ratio (p=0.714, χ(2)=0.134), and place of residence (urban vs. rural; p=0.874, χ(2)=0.025), between adherent and non-adherent patients. Moreover, adherence was not related to surgical outcome as evaluated by the Engel classification (p=0.635, χ(2)=1.628) or to the types of AEDs after surgery (p=0.165, χ(2)=6.530). The most common reasons for non-adherence were seizure-free status for an extended period (26.5%), forgetfulness (19.1%), and an inability to buy the drugs locally (18.6%). Conclusion. Adherence to AEDs is improved after epilepsy surgery compared to presurgical estimates, but is still a common and serious problem. Targeted postsurgical management programs and communication strategies are necessary to improve adherence to AEDs after epilepsy surgery.
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 02/2015; DOI:10.1684/epd.2014.0722
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    ABSTRACT: "Formes frustes" of encephalopathy associated with anti-NMDAR antibody have been recently described in cases of chronic epilepsy. We report a young woman with a parietal lesion and anti-NMDAR antibody who acquired bilateral, secondary epileptogenesis in the temporal lobes within a period as short as six years. Removal of the primary epileptogenic lesion of oligoastrocytoma in the right parietal lobe resulted in seizure freedom, disappearance of secondary foci, and substantial decrease of the antibody titre. Chronic exposure to anti-NMDAR antibody, albeit at a low titre, may have resulted in a smoldering chronic course and relatively early acquisition of "reversible" secondary foci without development of a high degree of epileptogenicity and structural changes.
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 02/2015; DOI:10.1684/epd.2015.0725
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    ABSTRACT: Ring chromosomes are rare abnormalities caused by the fusion of the telomeric regions. Three-ring chromosome syndromes (Cr 20, Cr 17 and Cr 14) cause epilepsy with variable phenotypes. In ring 17 patients with mild phenotype, some authors have shown an epilepsy syndrome similar to that of ring 20. We report the first case of a girl with ring chromosome 17 and a normal neurological and general cognitive profile. She had had, from 9 years old, focal pharmacoresistant epilepsy associated with episodes of non-convulsive status epilepticus with mainly autonomic features. Cytogenetic analysis revealed an abnormal karyotype characterised by the presence of de novo ring chromosome 17 in 19% of metaphases. The array CGH (100 KB) did not show any genetic deletion. The clinical and epilepsy phenotype was, to a certain degree, similar to that of ring 20 syndrome.
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 01/2015; DOI:10.1684/epd.2015.0726
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    ABSTRACT: Ring chromosomes are rare abnormalities caused by the fusion of the telomeric regions. Three-ring chromosome syndromes (Cr 20, Cr 17 and Cr 14) cause epilepsy with variable phenotypes. In ring 17 patients with mild phenotype, some authors have shown an epilepsy syndrome similar to that of ring 20. We report the first case of a girl with ring chromosome 17 and a normal neurological and general cognitive profile. She had had, from 9 years old, focal pharmacoresistant epilepsy associated with episodes of non-convulsive status epilepticus with mainly autonomic features. Cytogenetic analysis revealed an abnormal karyotype characterised by the presence of de novo ring chromosome 17 in 19% of metaphases. The array CGH (100 KB) did not show any genetic deletion. The clinical and epilepsy phenotype was, to a certain degree, similar to that of ring 20 syndrome. KEYWORDS: chromosome analysis; focal epilepsy; ring 17 syndrome; ring 20 syndrome
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Epilepsy is one of the most common and widespread neurological disorders affecting over 65 million people worldwide. Although estimates vary considerably, the annual incidence is considered to be almost 50 per 100,000 and prevalence around 700 per 100,000. It is thought, however, that more people are affected in low- and middle-income countries where resources to improve the care for people with epilepsy are limited. Of all people with epilepsy, around 80% live in resource-limited countries and up to 90% of these patients receive no treatment at all. National epilepsy programs to organize comprehensive care and cover educational, economic, and research aspects are necessary. A referral network will enable local healthcare workers to consult patients with more complex diseases and may ensure routine availability of inexpensive AEDs. Adequately identifying people with epilepsy and delivering cost-effective care in resource-limited countries is an important challenge for epileptologists and healthcare policy makers alike. Here we give an overview of the present situation and review the needs and the efforts currently being made in the field.
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 01/2015; DOI:10.1684/epd.2014.0721
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    ABSTRACT: Aim. To determine whether there is added benefit in detecting electrographic abnormalities from 16-24 hours of continuous video-EEG in adult medical/surgical ICU patients, compared to a 30-minute EEG. Methods. This was a prospectively enroled non-randomized study of 130 consecutive ICU patients for whom EEG was requested. For 117 patients, a 30-minute EEG was requested for altered mental state and/or suspected seizures; 83 patients continued with continuous video-EEG for 16-24 hours and 34 patients had only the 30-minute EEG. For 13 patients with prior seizures, continuous video-EEG was requested and was carried out for 16-24 hours. We gathered EEG data prospectively, and reviewed the medical records retrospectively to assess the impact of continuous video-EEG. Results. A total of 83 continuous video-EEG recordings were performed for 16-24 hours beyond 30 minutes of routine EEG. All were slow, and 34% showed epileptiform findings in the first 30 minutes, including 2% with seizures. Over 16-24 hours, 14% developed new or additional epileptiform abnormalities, including 6% with seizures. In 8%, treatment was changed based on continuous video-EEG. Among the 34 EEGs limited to 30 minutes, almost all were slow and 18% showed epileptiform activity, including 3% with seizures. Among the 13 patients with known seizures, continuous video-EEG was slow in all and 69% had epileptiform abnormalities in the first 30 minutes, including 31% with seizures. An additional 8% developed epileptiform abnormalities over 16-24 hours. In 46%, treatment was changed based on continuous video-EEG. Conclusion. This study indicates that if continuous video-EEG is not available, a 30-minute EEG in the ICU has a substantial diagnostic yield and will lead to the detection of the majority of epileptiform abnormalities. In a small percentage of patients, continuous video-EEG will lead to the detection of additional epileptiform abnormalities. In a sub-population, with a history of seizures prior to the initiation of EEG recording, the benefits of continuous video-EEG in monitoring seizure activity and influencing treatment may be greater.
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 12/2014; 16(4). DOI:10.1684/epd.2014.0715
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    ABSTRACT: Musicogenic seizure is classified as a rare form of complex reflex seizures. We present a patient with musicogenic seizures from whom invasive recordings were obtained using subdural arrays, as well as hippocampal depth electrodes. Interestingly, this patient had both spontaneous seizures and musicogenic seizures, and they originated from different hippocampi. Due to bilateral independent musicogenic seizures and spontaneous seizures, our patient was not eligible for surgery, but vagal nerve stimulation treatment was almost successful. [Published with video sequence].
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 12/2014; 16(4). DOI:10.1684/epd.2014.0706
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    ABSTRACT: To date, only a few studies have reported that, in tuberous sclerosis, TSC2 mutations are more frequently associated with infantile spasms and cognitive impairment compared to TSC1 mutations. We analyzed the mutational spectrum of patients with tuberous sclerosis in Korea and attempted to explore the associations between genotype and seizure type/outcome. We performed mutational analyses on 70 unrelated patients with clinically confirmed tuberous sclerosis by using direct DNA sequencing and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. The patients' medical records, including epilepsy type and outcome, were reviewed retrospectively. We identified pathogenic mutations in 55 patients (79%), 25 of which were novel. There were 12 TSC1 mutations and 43 TSC2 mutations. TSC1 mutations included 8 frameshift and 4 nonsense mutations. TSC2 mutations included 12 frameshift, 10 nonsense, 6 splicing, and 6 missense mutations, as well as 4 in-frame deletions and 5 large deletions. Fifty-eight patients had epilepsy (83%), including 19 patients with a history of infantile spasms. Compared to patients with TSC1 mutations, individuals with TSC2 mutations had a significantly higher frequency of epilepsy (p<0.05) and tended to have a higher frequency of infantile spasms (37% vs 17%; p<0.3). Most of the patients with TSC2 mutations who developed infantile spasms exhibited subsequent epilepsy (13/14; 93%). However, the presence/absence of infantile spasms did not influence seizure remission or cognitive outcome.
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 12/2014; 16(4). DOI:10.1684/epd.2014.0712
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    ABSTRACT: We present a case of autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies targeting contactin-associated protein-like 2. This case is notable because of the presentation with myoclonic status epilepticus and the prolonged clinical course of refractory seizures, which are demonstrated in the accompanying videos, and not previously associated with this condition. Treatment with prednisone, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange, rituximab, cyclophosphamide, and mycophenolate mofetil resulted in significant functional improvement. Historically, myoclonic status epilepticus is associated with a grave prognosis and minimal chance of meaningful recovery. This case demonstrates that autoimmune encephalitis remains an important differential diagnosis in patients with such a presentation, and that early recognition and the appropriate institution of immunotherapy can result in seizure control and functional recovery. [Published with video sequences].
    Epileptic disorders: international epilepsy journal with videotape 12/2014; 16(4). DOI:10.1684/epd.2014.0707