Hematology Research and Reviews Journal Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Dove Medical Press

Journal description

An international, peer- reviewed, open access, online journal publishing laboratory, experimental and clinical aspects of hematology. Original research, short reports, reviews, case reports and commentaries are invited.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Journal of Hematology Research and Reviews - Dove Press Open Access Publisher
ISSN 1179-2736
Document type Journal / Internet Resource

Publisher details

Dove Medical Press

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On institutional repository, central repository or subject -based repository, including PubMed Central
    • Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License
    • UK funded authors may use a Creative Commons Attribution License
    • On a non-profit server
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Published source (journal and Dove Medical Press) must be acknowledged as original place of publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF may be used
    • All titles are open access journals
    • Publisher last contacted on 20/01/2013
  • Classification

Publications in this journal

  • Hematology Research and Reviews 11/2015; DOI:10.2147/JBM.S90179
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    ABSTRACT: Multiple myeloma is a malignancy involving plasma cell proliferation within the bone marrow. Survival of patients diagnosed with myeloma has significantly improved in the last decade, following the approval of novel agents. Despite great strides achieved in the management of multiple myeloma, it is still considered an incurable disease as the majority of patients relapse after initiation of therapy. Additionally, the duration of response generally decreases with an increasing number of therapy lines. The need to overcome resistance to therapy dictates research into more potent agents and those with novel mechanisms of action. A therapeutic option for relapsed/refractory myeloma includes histone deacetylase inhibition. Various histone deacetylase inhibitors, including the newly approved panobinostat, are currently under evaluation in this setting. Panobinostat for multiple myeloma is used in combination with other potent therapeutic agents, such as proteasome inhibitors and steroids. Ongoing research evaluating other panobinostat-containing regimens will provide additional insight into its place in myeloma management.
    Hematology Research and Reviews 10/2015; 6:269. DOI:10.2147/JBM.S69140
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    ABSTRACT: Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) encompasses numerous diverse conditions resulting in peripheral hypereosinophilia that cannot be explained by hypersensitivity, infection, or atopy and that is not associated with known systemic diseases with specific organ involvement. HES is often attributed to neoplastic or reactive causes, such as chronic eosinophilic leukemia, although a majority of cases remains unexplained and are considered idiopathic. Here, we review the current diagnosis and management of HES and present a unique case of profound hypereosinophilia associated with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia requiring intensive management. This case clearly illustrates the limitations of current knowledge with respect to hypereosinophilia syndrome as well as the challenges associated with its classification and management.
    Hematology Research and Reviews 09/2015; 6:257-60. DOI:10.2147/JBM.S90078
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    ABSTRACT: Total joint arthroplasty can be associated with major blood loss and require subsequent blood transfusions for postoperative anemia. Measures to effectively and safely decrease blood loss and reduce the need for blood transfusions would help improve patient safety and lower health care costs. A possible pharmacological option to reduce surgical blood loss in total joint arthroplasty is the use of tranexamic acid. Abundant literature has shown that intravenous and/or topical administration of tranexamic acid is effective in reducing blood loss and blood transfusions, with no increased risk of venous thromboembolic events or other complications.
    Hematology Research and Reviews 08/2015; 6:239. DOI:10.2147/JBM.S61915
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    ABSTRACT: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative treatment currently in use for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). The first successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was performed in 1984. To date, approximately 1,200 transplants have been reported. Given the high prevalence of this disorder in Africa, and its emergence in the developed world through immigration, this number is relatively small. There are many reasons for this; primary among them are the availability of a donor, the risks associated with this complex procedure, and the cost and availability of resources in the developing world. Of these, it is fair to say that the risks associated with the procedure have steadily decreased to the point where, if currently performed in a center with experience using a matched sibling donor, overall survival is close to 100% and event-free survival is over 90%. While there is little controversy around offering hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to symptomatic SCD patients with a matched sibling donor, there is much debate surrounding the use of this modality in "less severe" patients. An overview of the current state of our understanding of the pathology and treatment of SCD is important to show that our current strategy is not having the desired impact on survival of homozygous SCD patients, and should be changed to significantly impact the small proportion of these patients who have matched siblings and could be cured, especially those without overt clinical manifestations. Both patient families and providers must be made to understand the progressive nature of SCD, and should be encouraged to screen full siblings of patients with homozygous SCD for their potential to be donors. Matched siblings should be referred to an experienced transplant center for evaluation and counseling. In this review, we will discuss the rationale for these opinions and make recommendations for patient selection.
    Hematology Research and Reviews 07/2015; 6:229-38. DOI:10.2147/JBM.S60515
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To compare the safety and efficacy of dabigatran to warfarin for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a disease comprised of two conditions: deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. VTE is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with an annual incidence estimated at 1-3 cases per 1,000 individuals. This incidence increases with age from 0.1 per 1,000 in adolescence to eight per 1,000 in those 80 years of age and older. As the proportion of patients 65 years of age and older expands, the number of patients presenting with VTE will also increase. Anticoagulation remains the cornerstone of VTE treatment. Traditionally, vitamin K antagonists have been used to minimize the risk of thrombus extension and for secondary prevention. Unpredictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, routine monitoring, drug-food and drug-drug interactions, and potentially severe adverse events have all been cited as barriers to optimal care. Dabigatran has been proposed as a suitable alternative to warfarin therapy in the treatment of VTE. Therefore, a critical appraisal of dabigatran's safety and efficacy is necessary to determine its role in therapy. Conclusion: Dabigatran remains an alternative to warfarin therapy for the treatment of VTE. However, dabigatran also has distinct disadvantages that warrant consideration. Clinicians must ensure that drug characteristics align with patient characteristics to optimize patient outcomes.
    Hematology Research and Reviews 06/2015; 6:177. DOI:10.2147/JBM.S54033
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    ABSTRACT: Transfusional iron overload is a major target in the care of patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia (TDT) and other refractory anemias. Iron accumulates in the liver, heart, and endocrine organs leading to a wide array of complications. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of the approved iron chelators, deferoxamine, deferiprone, and deferasirox, and the evidence behind the use of each, as monotherapy or as part of combination therapy. We also review the different guidelines on iron chelation in TDT. This review also discusses future prospects and directions in the treatment of transfusional iron overload in TDT whether through innovation in chelation or other therapies, such as novel agents that improve transfusion dependence.
    Hematology Research and Reviews 06/2015; 6:197-209. DOI:10.2147/JBM.S72463