Infection and Drug Resistance

Description

An international, peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that focuses on the optimal treatment of infection (bacterial, fungal and viral) and the development and institution of preventative strategies to minimize the development and spread of resistance. The journal is specifically concerned with the epidemiology of antibiotic resistance and the mechanisms of resistance development and diffusion in both hospitals and the community. In particular, research and clinical development of novel mechanism of action anti-infectives and the optimal use of existing therapies will be highlighted. Other areas of coverage include diagnostic and early detection of infection, proteomic and genomic studies to characterize surface proteins in resistant organisms, and educational and infection control strategies. With increased mortality, morbidity and healthcare costs associated with developing resistance, research, clinical studies and programs designed to improve outcomes and patient adherence and satisfaction will be given priority. The journal is characterized by the rapid reporting of reviews, guidelines, original research and clinical studies in all areas of infection and drug resistance.

Publications in this journal

  • Infection and Drug Resistance 12/2014; 2014(7):337-342.
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    ABSTRACT: Antibiotic de-escalation is a potential strategy advocated to conserve the effectiveness of broad-spectrum antibiotics. The aim of this study was to examine the safety and feasibility of antibiotic de-escalation in patients admitted with bacteremic pneumonia.
    Infection and Drug Resistance 01/2014; 7:177-82.
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    ABSTRACT: Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobial treatment. Diagnostic techniques have clearly improved in the last years and allow earlier identification of bacterial strains in some cases, but these techniques are still quite expensive and not readily available in all institutions. Moreover, the ever increasing rates of resistance to antimicrobials, especially in Gram-negative pathogens, are threatening the outcome for such patients because of the lack of effective medical treatment; ICU physicians are therefore resorting to combination therapies to overcome resistance, with the direct consequence of promoting further resistance. A more appropriate use of available antimicrobials in the ICU should be pursued, and adjustments in doses and dosing through pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have recently shown promising results in improving outcomes and reducing antimicrobial resistance. The aim of multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programs is to improve antimicrobial prescription, and in this review we analyze the available experiences of such programs carried out in ICUs, with emphasis on results, challenges, and pitfalls. Any effective intervention aimed at improving antibiotic usage in ICUs must be brought about at the present time; otherwise, we will face the challenge of intractable infections in critically ill patients in the near future.
    Infection and Drug Resistance 01/2014; 7:261-71.
  • Junichi Yoshida, Yukiko Harada, Tetsuya Kikuchi, Ikuyo Asano, Takako Ueno, Nobuo Matsubara
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to elucidate risk factors, including ward antimicrobial use density (AUD), for central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a 430-bed community hospital using central venous lines with closed-hub systems. We calculated AUD as (total dose)/(defined daily dose × patient days) ×1,000 for a total of 20 drugs, nine wards, and 24 months. Into each line day data, we inputed AUD and device utilization ratios, number of central line days, and CLABSI. The ratio of susceptible strains in isolates were subjected to correlation analysis with AUD. Of a total of 9,997 line days over 24 months, CLABSI was present in 33 cases (3.3 ‰), 14 (42.4%) of which were on surgical wards out of nine wards. Of a total of 43 strains isolated, eight (18.6%) were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); none of the MRSA-positive patients had received cefotiam before the onset of infection. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that central line day 7 had the highest accuracy. Logistic regression analysis showed the central line day showed an odds ratio of 5.511 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.936-15.690 as did AUD of cefotiam showing an odds ratio of 0.220 with 95% confidence interval of 0.00527-0.922 (P=0.038). Susceptible strains ratio and AUD showed a negative correlation (R (2)=0.1897). Thus, CLABSI could be prevented by making the number of central line days as short as possible. The preventative role of AUD remains to be investigated.
    Infection and Drug Resistance 01/2014; 7:331-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Antimicrobials are an extremely valuable resource across the spectrum of modern medicine. Their development has been associated with dramatic reductions in communicable disease mortality and has facilitated technological advances in cancer therapy, transplantation, and surgery. However, this resource is threatened by the dwindling supply of new antimicrobials and the global increase in antimicrobial resistance. There is an urgent need for antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) to protect our remaining antimicrobials for future generations. AMS emphasizes sensible, appropriate antimicrobial management for the benefit of the individual and society as a whole. Within the English National Health Service (NHS), a series of recent policy initiatives have focused on all aspects of AMS, including best practice guidelines for antimicrobial prescribing, enhanced surveillance mechanisms for monitoring antimicrobial use across primary and secondary care, and new prescribing competencies for doctors in training. Here we provide a concise summary to clarify the current position and importance of AMS within the NHS and review the evidence base for AMS recommendations. The evidence supports the impact of AMS strategies on modifying prescribing practice in hospitals, with beneficial effects on both antimicrobial resistance and the incidence of Clostridium difficile, and no evidence of increased sepsis-related mortality. There is also a promising role for novel diagnostic technologies in AMS, both in enhancing microbiological diagnosis and improving the specificity of sepsis diagnosis. More work is needed to establish an evidence base for interventions to improve public and patient education regarding the role of antibiotics in common clinical syndromes, such as respiratory tract infection. Future priorities include establishing novel approaches to antimicrobial management (eg, duration of therapy, combination regimens) to protect against resistance and working with the pharmaceutical industry to promote the development of new antimicrobials.
    Infection and Drug Resistance 01/2014; 7:145-152.
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    ABSTRACT: Raltegravir is an integrase strand-transfer inhibitor approved for the treatment of HIV infection. It was the first medication in a novel class of antiretroviral agents to be approved for use in the United States in 2007. Raltegravir exhibits potent activity against wild-type HIV-1, but resistance development has been noted through three different pathways. It is metabolized primarily through uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 and has a single inactive glucuronide metabolite. Raltegravir is not a substrate, inhibitor, or inducer of cytochrome P450 enzymes and exhibits low potential for drug-drug interactions; however, strong uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 inhibitors or inducers can alter the pharmacokinetics of raltegravir. It is well tolerated, and the most commonly reported adverse effects include headache, nausea, and diarrhea. Serious adverse effects with raltegravir are rare but include rhabdomyolysis and severe skin and hypersensitivity reactions. It has been approved for use in both treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced patients and is a preferred first-line agent in both United States and European HIV treatment guidelines. Although initial approval was granted on 48-week data, 5-year clinical data have recently been published. This article reviews the data supporting long-term efficacy and safety of raltegravir in the treatment of HIV infection.
    Infection and Drug Resistance 01/2014; 7:73-84.
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    ABSTRACT: Bacterial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to widespread antibiotic resistance among pathogens. This review aims to give an overview of the major horizontal transfer mechanisms and their evolution and then demonstrate the human lower gastrointestinal tract as an environment in which horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants occurs. Finally, implications for antibiotic usage and the development of resistant infections and persistence of antibiotic resistance genes in populations as a result of horizontal gene transfer in the large intestine will be discussed.
    Infection and Drug Resistance 01/2014; 7:167-76.
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the virulence factors including hemolysin production, β-lactamase production, and biofilm formation. Antimicrobial resistance and plasmid content of 20 Escherichia coli isolates obtained from feces and Tigris water were screened. Ten clinical and ten environmental E. coli isolates were collected from children diarrhea and swim areas on Tigris River in Baghdad city, Iraq, respectively. The bacterial isolates were identified by cultural characteristics, Gram stain, biochemical tests, and screened for the presence of E. coli O157:H7 serotype. Bacterial E. coli isolates were investigated for hemolysin production, biofilm formation, and β-lactamase production. Antibiotics susceptibility and plasmid content were determined. A total of ten clinical and ten water E. coli isolates were studied. Results showed that all E. coli isolates give negative results for latex O157:H7. Virulence factors analysis showed that 6/10 water isolates and 2/10 clinical isolates were hemolytic, 5/10 water isolates and 3/10 clinical isolates were biofilm formation, and 7/10 water isolates and 4/10 clinical isolates were β-lactamase producer. Antibiotics profile showed that all bacterial isolates were multidrug resistant. All E. coli isolates (100%) were resistant to carbenicillin, cefodizime, imipenem, and piperacillin. The plasmid DNA analysis showed that all E. coli isolates contained plasmid with molecular weight range between 4.507 kbp and 5.07 kbp, but clinical isolates contained multiple small and mega plasmids. Our study revealed that E. coli isolates from river water exhibit a higher level of hemolysin production, β-lactamase production, and biofilm formation than feces isolates may be due to long adaptation. On the other hand, clinical E. coli isolates from feces showed higher level of antibiotic resistance and have multiple plasmids.
    Infection and Drug Resistance 01/2014; 7:317-322.
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    ABSTRACT: Francisella tularensis is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterium that causes life-threatening tularemia. Although the prevalence of natural infection is low, F. tularensis remains a tier I priority pathogen due to its extreme virulence and ease of aerosol dissemination. F. tularensis can infect a host through multiple routes, including the intradermal and respiratory routes. Respiratory infection can result from a very small inoculum (ten organisms or fewer) and is the most lethal form of infection. Following infection, F. tularensis employs strategies for immune evasion that delay the immune response, permitting systemic distribution and induction of sepsis. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of F. tularensis in an immunological context, with emphasis on the host response and bacterial evasion of that response.
    Infection and Drug Resistance 01/2014; 7:239-51.
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    ABSTRACT: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) occurrence, causative pathogens, and resistance patterns in surgical intensive care units (SICU) are different between Western and developing Asian countries. In Thailand, resistant organisms have progressively increased in the last decade. However, the evidence describing causes of VAP and its outcomes, especially secondary to resistant pathogens, in Asian developing countries' SICUs is very limited. Therefore, the objective of this study was to describe the incidence, pathogen characteristics, and risk factors that impact mortality and patient survival following VAP in a tertiary Northern Thai SICU.
    Infection and Drug Resistance 01/2014; 7:203-10.
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    ABSTRACT: Antibiotic resistance is an increasing public health concern around the world. Rapid increase in the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has been the target of extensive research efforts to develop a novel class of antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small cationic amphiphilic peptides, which play an important role in the defense against bacterial infections through disruption of their membranes. They have been regarded as a potential source of future antibiotics, owing to a remarkable set of advantageous properties such as broad-spectrum activity, and they do not readily induce drug-resistance. However, AMPs have some intrinsic drawbacks, such as susceptibility to enzymatic degradation, toxicity, and high production cost. Currently, a new class of AMPs termed "peptidomimetics" have been developed, which can mimic the bactericidal mechanism of AMPs, while being stable to enzymatic degradation and displaying potent activity against multidrug-resistant bacteria. This review will focus on current findings of antimicrobial peptidomimetics. The potential future directions in the development of more potent analogs of peptidomimetics as a new generation of antimicrobial agents are also presented.
    Infection and Drug Resistance 01/2014; 7:229-37.
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    ABSTRACT: Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is the most common health care-associated infection contributing to death. Studies have indicated that there may be differences in the causative pathogens and outcomes of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and non-ventilator-associated pneumonia (NV-HAP). However, with limited NV-HAP-specific data available, treatment is generally based on data from studies of VAP. The Phase 3 Assessment of Telavancin for Treatment of Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia (ATTAIN) studies were two double-blind randomized controlled trials that demonstrated the non-inferiority of telavancin to vancomycin for treatment of Gram-positive HAP. We conducted a post hoc subgroup analysis of patients enrolled in the ATTAIN studies who had NV-HAP.
    Infection and Drug Resistance 01/2014; 7:129-135.
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    ABSTRACT: This review describes Escherichia coli O157 outbreaks in the United Kingdom, beginning from the first, in the 1980s, to those recorded in 2013. We point out that the United Kingdom differs from other countries, particularly the United States, in that it has had a considerable number of outbreaks associated with butchers, but very few caused by contaminated burgers. Two of the butcher-associated outbreaks (in central Scotland in 1996 and South Wales in 2005) were very large and are considered here in detail; the reviewer conducted detailed investigations into both outbreaks. Also considered is the very large outbreak that occurred in visitors to an open farm in Surrey in 2009. Detailed descriptions of some milk-borne outbreaks and incidents connected with camping and childrens' nurseries have been published, and these are also considered in this review. Large outbreaks in the United Kingdom have sometimes led to policy developments regarding food safety, and these are considered, together with public reactions to them, their health effect, and their value, as examples to follow or eschew in terms of the procedures to be adopted in response to incidents of this kind. Regulatory and legal consequences are also considered. As a wise man said, making predictions is difficult, particularly about the future. This review follows this position but points out that although human infections caused by E. coli O157 are rare in the United Kingdom, their incidence has not changed significantly in the last 17 years. This review points out that although a response to an outbreak is to say "lessons must be learned", this response has been tempered by forgetfulness. Accordingly, this review restricts its recommendations regarding outbreaks to two: the crucial importance of a rapid response and the importance of experience, and even "gut feeling", when an inspector is evaluating the safety of a food business.
    Infection and Drug Resistance 01/2014; 7:211-22.