Clinical Interventions in Aging (Clin Interv Aging )

Publisher: Society for Applied Research in Aging, Dove Medical Press

Description

An international, peer-reviewed journal focusing on evidence-based reports on the value or lack thereof of treatments intended to prevent or delay the onset of maladaptive correlates of aging in human beings. Official journal of the Society for Applied Research in Aging (SARA).

Impact factor 1.82

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    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    2.41
  • Cited half-life
    4.20
  • Immediacy index
    0.25
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.67
  • Website
    Clinical Interventions in Aging website
  • ISSN
    1176-9092
  • OCLC
    123067223
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Dove Medical Press

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On institutional repository, central repository or subject -based repository, including PubMed Central
    • Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License
    • UK funded authors may use a Creative Commons Attribution License
    • On a non-profit server
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Published source (journal and Dove Medical Press) must be acknowledged as original place of publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF may be used
    • All titles are open access journals
    • Publisher last contacted on 20/01/2013
  • Classification
    ​ blue

Publications in this journal

  • Clinical Interventions in Aging 07/2014; 2014(9):1039-1042.
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    ABSTRACT: Maintaining a stable and adequate sleeping pattern is associated with good health and disease prevention. As a restorative process, sleep is important for supporting immune function and aiding the body in healing and recovery. Aging is associated with characteristic changes to sleep quantity and quality, which make it more difficult to adjust sleep–wake rhythms to changing environmental conditions. Sleep disturbance and abnormal sleep–wake cycles are commonly reported in seriously ill older patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). A combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors appears to contribute to these disruptions. Little is known regarding the effect that sleep disturbance has on health status in the oldest of old (80+), a group, who with diminishing physiological reserve and increasing prevalence of frailty, is at a greater risk of adverse health outcomes, such as cognitive decline and mortality. Here we review how sleep is altered in the ICU, with particular attention to older patients, especially those aged 80 years. Further work is required to understand what impact sleep disturbance has on frailty levels and poor outcomes in older critically ill patients.
    Clinical Interventions in Aging 06/2014; 9:969.
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    ABSTRACT: Exercise therapy is generally recommended for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Comorbidity, which is highly prevalent in OA, may interfere with exercise therapy. To date, there is no evidence-based protocol for the treatment of patients with knee OA and comorbidity. Special protocols adapted to the comorbidity may facilitate the application of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA and one or more comorbidities.
    Clinical Interventions in Aging 04/2014; 9:829-42.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of two sessions of resistance exercise with different volumes on post-exercise hypotension, forearm blood flow, and forearm vascular resistance in hypertensive elderly subjects. The study was conducted with ten hypertensive elderly (65±3 years, 28.7±3 kg/m(2)) subjected to three experimental sessions, ie, a control session, exercise with a set (S1), and exercise with three sets (S3). For each session, the subjects were evaluated before and after intervention. In the pre-intervention period, blood pressure, forearm blood flow, and forearm vascular resistance were measured after 10 minutes of rest in the supine position. Thereafter, the subjects were taken to the gym to perform their exercise sessions or remained at rest during the same time period. Both S1 and S3 comprised a set of ten repetitions of ten exercises, with an interval of 90 seconds between exercises. Subsequently, the measurements were again performed at 10, 30, 50, 70, and 90 minutes of recovery (post-intervention) in the supine position. Post-exercise hypotension was greater in S3 than in S1 (systolic blood pressure, -26.5±4.2 mmHg versus -17.9±4.7 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure, -13.8±4.9 mmHg versus -7.7±5 mmHg, P<0.05). Similarly, forearm blood flow and forearm vascular resistance changed significantly in both sessions with an increase and decrease, respectively, that was more evident in S3 than in S1 (P<0.05). Resistance exercises with higher volume were more effective in causing post-exercise hypotension, being accompanied by an increase in forearm blood flow and a reduction of forearm vascular resistance.
    Clinical Interventions in Aging 01/2014; 9:2151-2158.
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    ABSTRACT: The goal of this study was to investigate the anti-osteoporosis effect of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) in vivo, and explore its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory properties in Sprague Dawley rats and its anticancer properties in patients. A total of 120 healthy female Sprague Dawley rats aged 6 months were divided into four groups: 1) sham-operated control (Sham group, n=30); 2) ovariectomized (OVX group, n=30); 3) ovariectomized rats supplemented with EVOO (OVX + Olive, n=30); 4) ovariectomized rats supplemented with estrogen (OVX + E2, n=30). EVOO and estrogen were administered by oral gavage at a dose of 1 mL/100 g weight on a daily basis for 12 consecutive weeks. Twelve weeks later blood samples were obtained to detect the levels of calcium, alkaline phosphatase, phosphorus, interleukin-6 (IL-6), malonyldialdehyde (MDA), and nitrate content. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometer measured bone mineral density (BMD) of ovariectomized Sprague Dawley rats that had been fed olive oil for 3 months. Blood samples from patients, who regularly consumed olive oil over a 1 year period were also used to measure carbohydrate antigen 125, carcino-embryonic antigen, α-fetoprotein, and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels. BMD of lumbar spine and left femur was also evaluated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Animal experiments showed that EVOO significantly increased BMD and decreased phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, IL-6, MDA, and nitrate levels. However, it had no significant effect on the Ca(2+) level. In clinical follow-up, EVOO also improved patient BMD levels on L3, L4, and left femoral neck, and reduced carbohydrate antigen 125, α-fetoprotein, and carcino-embryonic antigen levels. But it had no significant effect on the carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level. EVOO illustrated significant anti-osteoporosis, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties in vivo. However, further studies are required to determine the active component(s) responsible for these effects.
    Clinical Interventions in Aging 01/2014; 9:2087-2095.
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    ABSTRACT: When a hospitalized older patient falls or develops delirium, there are significant consequences for the patient and the health care system. Assessments of inattention and altered consciousness, markers for delirium, were analyzed to determine if they were also associated with falls. This retrospective case-control study from a regional tertiary Veterans Affairs referral center identified falls and delirium risk factors from quality databases from 2010 to 2012. Older fallers with complete delirium risk assessments prior to falling were identified. As a control, non-fallers were matched at a 3:1 ratio. Admission risk factors that were compared in fallers and non-fallers included altered consciousness, cognitive performance, attention, sensory deficits, and dehydration. Odds ratio (OR) was reported (95% confidence interval [CI]). After identifying 67 fallers, the control population (n=201) was matched on age (74.4±9.8 years) and ward (83.6% medical; 16.4% intensive care unit). Inattention as assessed by the Months of the Year Backward test was more common in fallers (67.2% versus 50.8%, OR=2.0; 95% CI: 1.1-3.7). Fallers tended to have altered consciousness prior to falling (28.4% versus 12.4%, OR=2.8; 95% CI: 1.3-5.8). In this case-control study, alterations in consciousness and inattention, assessed prior to falling, were more common in patients who fell. Brief assessments of consciousness and attention should be considered for inclusion in fall prediction.
    Clinical Interventions in Aging 01/2014; 9:2013-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Hypernatremia in the geriatric population is a common disorder associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Older people are predisposed to developing hypernatremia because of age-related physiologic changes such as decreased thirst drive, impaired urinary concentrating ability, and reduced total body water. Medications may exacerbate this predisposition. Hypernatremia and dehydration occurring in nursing homes are considered indicators of neglect that warrant reporting, but there are other nonavoidable causes of hypernatremia, and consideration at time of presentation is essential to prevent delay in diagnosis and management. We describe a case illustrating the importance of the consideration of alternate explanations for hypernatremia in a nursing home resident, followed by a review of hypernatremia in the elderly population, to underscore that neglect is the etiology of exclusion after alternatives have been considered.
    Clinical Interventions in Aging 01/2014; 9:1987-92.