Vascular Health and Risk Management (Vasc Health Risk Manag)

Publisher: Dove Medical Press

Journal description

An international, peer-reviewed journal of therapeutics and risk management, focusing on concise rapid reporting of clinical studies on the processes involved in the maintenance of vascular health; the monitoring, prevention, and treatment of vascular disease and its sequelae; and the involvement of metabolic disorders, particularly diabetes. In addition, the journal will also seek to define drug usage in terms of ultimate uptake and acceptance by the patient and healthcare professional. Official journal of the International Society of Vascular Health (ISVH).

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Vascular Health and Risk Management website
ISSN 1176-6344
OCLC 163326870
Material type Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Dove Medical Press

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On institutional repository, central repository or subject -based repository, including PubMed Central
    • Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License
    • UK funded authors may use a Creative Commons Attribution License
    • On a non-profit server
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Published source (journal and Dove Medical Press) must be acknowledged as original place of publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF may be used
    • All titles are open access journals
    • Publisher last contacted on 20/01/2013
  • Classification
    ​ blue

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: The objective of this study is to explore the feasibility and efficacy of a new tech- nique for sutureless vascular anastomosis, using glued prosthesis, as a sole anastomosis fixation method in rabbits. Methods: Ten rabbits were randomly selected to conduct the experiment. Five rabbits underwent direct anastomosis of infrarenal abdominal aorta, with glued prosthesis. In five other rabbits, reconstruction was done by sutured anastomosis. All animals were immediately examined by echo-Doppler for patency of anastomosis. The burst pressure of the glued anastomosis was measured and compared with that of a sutured artery. The animals were euthanized, and tissue samples were taken for histological examination immediately after the experiment. Results: Compared to conventional anastomoses, sutureless vascular anastomoses required shorter time of creation and significantly reduced blood loss (P,5%). There was no significant difference on the average blood flow through the anastomosis between two groups at the end of surgery. All anastomoses with glued prosthesis, examined by echo-Doppler, were patent at the anastomotic site, except one, which was stenosed immediately after surgery. In the control group, except one with stenosis, all conventional anastomoses were patent. Mean burst pressure at the anastomotic site for sutureless anastomoses was lower than in control group. Macroscopically, the BioGlue did not demonstrate any adhesion to the surrounding tissue as it was covered by the vascular prosthesis. Histological examination showed low-grade inflammatory reaction in glued anastomoses versus no inflammatory reaction at the sutured anastomoses. Conclusion: This technique may provide a feasible and successful alternative in vascular surgery. However, further long-term studies are necessary to elucidate the break pressure and degree of inflammation at the anastomotic site. Keywords: sutureless vascular anastomosis, polytetrafluoroethylene prosthesis, BioGlue, rabbit aorta
    Vascular Health and Risk Management 03/2015; 2015:11 211–217(11):211-217.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have an increased cardiovascular risk. Although initially this increased risk was attributed to metabolic alterations associated with antiretroviral treatment, in recent years, the attention has been focused on the HIV disease itself. Inflammation, immune system activation, and endothelial dysfunction facilitated by HIV infection have been identified as key factors in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. In this review, we describe the epidemiology and pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in patients with HIV infection and summarize the latest knowledge on the relationship between traditional and novel inflammatory, immune activation, and endothelial dysfunction biomarkers on the cardiovascular risk associated with HIV infection.
    Vascular Health and Risk Management 01/2015;
  • Vascular Health and Risk Management 01/2013; 9:125-133.
  • Source
    Vascular Health and Risk Management 09/2008; 4(5):1145-1146.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: While there is no doubt that high risk patients (those with >20% ten year risk of future cardiovascular event) need more aggressive preventive therapy, a majority of cardiovascular events occur in individuals at intermediate risk (10%-20% ten year risk). Accurate risk assessment may be helpful in decreasing cardiovascular events through more appropriate targeting of preventive measures. It has been suggested that traditional risk assessment may be refined with the selective use of coronary artery calcium (CAC) or other methods of subclinical atherosclerosis measurement. Coronary calcification is a marker of atherosclerosis that can be quantified with the use of cardiac CT and it is proportional to the extent and severity of atherosclerotic disease. The published studies demonstrate a high sensitivity of CAC for the presence of coronary artery disease but a lower specificity for obstructive CAD depending on the magnitude of the CAC. Several large clinical trials found clear, incremental predictive value of CAC over the Framingham risk score when used in asymptomatic patients. Based on multiple observational studies, patients with increased plaque burdens (increased CAC) are approximately ten times more likely to suffer a cardiac event over the next 3-5 years. Coronary calcium scores have outperformed conventional risk factors, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) and carotid intima media thickness (IMT) as a predictor of cardiovascular events. The relevant prognostic information obtained may be useful to initiate or intensify appropriate treatment strategies to slow the progression of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Current data suggests intermediate risk patients may benefit most from further risk stratification with cardiac CT, as CAC testing is effective at identifying increased risk and in motivating effective behavioral changes. This article reviews information pertaining to the clinical use of CAC for assessing coronary atherosclerosis as a useful predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD) in certain population of patients.
    Vascular Health and Risk Management 04/2008; 4(2):315-24.