International Microbiology (INT MICROBIOL )

Publisher: Sociedad Española de Microbiología, Springer Verlag

Description

International Microbiology, the official journal of the Spanish Society for Microbiology (SEM), aims to advance and disseminate information in the fields of basic and applied microbiology among microbiologists around the world. The journal publishes two kinds of contributions: Articles (original research and short reviews) and Complements (perspectives, opinion, book reviews, editorials, etc). A feature of International Microbiology that distinguishes it from many other microbiology journals is a broadening of the term ''microbiology'' to include eukaryotic microorganisms, as well as the publication of articles about microbiologists and their work and questions related to the history and sociology of this science. It offers short publication times and a complete copy-editing service. The journal encourages submissions in the following areas: Microorganisms (viruses, prokaryotes, protists, moulds, yeast); Microbial biology (taxonomy, genetics, morphology, physiology, ecology, pathogenesis); Microbial applications (environmental, soil, industrial, food and medical microbiology, biodeterioration, bioremediation, biotechnology); State of the art of microbiology in different regions of the world; Outstanding microbiologists; Microbiology and education; The history and sociology of microbiology.

  • Impact factor
    2.56
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    2.07
  • Cited half-life
    7.90
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.57
  • Website
    International Microbiology website
  • Other titles
    International microbiology (Online)
  • ISSN
    1139-6709
  • OCLC
    48268850
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors own final version only can be archived
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's website or institutional repository
    • On funders designated website/repository after 12 months at the funders request or as a result of legal obligation
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • International Microbiology 01/2014;
  • International Microbiology 01/2014; 17(1):41-48.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A microcosm cultivation-based method was set up to investigate the growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), isolated from a water sample acquired at a depth of 50 m from the northern basin of Lake Kivu. For this purpose, both CARD-FISH and qPCR targeting of archaeal 16S rRNA and amoA genes were used. Archaeal cell growth at the end of the 246-day microcosm experiment accounted for 35 % of the SybrGold-stained cells, which corresponded to 6.61 × 10^6 cells/ml and 1.76 ± 0.09 × 10^6 archaeal 16S rRNA gene copies/ml. Clone libraries and DGGE fingerprinting confirmed the dominance of AOA phylotypes in the archaeal community microcosm. The majority of the identified archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences in the clone libraries were affiliated with Thaumarchaeota Marine Group 1.1a. Subsequent cultivation of the AOA community on deep-well microtiter plates in medium containing different carbon sources to stimulate archaeal growth failed to show significant differences in archaeal abundance (ANOVA t14 = –1.058, P = 0.308 and ANOVA t14 = 1.584, P = 0.135 for yeast extract and simple organic acids, respectively). The lack of growth stimulation by organic compounds is in concordance with the oligotrophic status of Lake Kivu. Finally, the addition of antibiotics to the growth medium resulted in archaeal cell counts that were signifi cantly lower than those obtained from cultures in antibiotic-free medium (ANOVA t14 = 12.12, P < 0.001).
    International Microbiology 12/2013; 16(3):177-189.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Surfaces of medical implants are generally designed to encourage soft- and/or hard-tissue adherence, eventually leading to tissue- or osseo-integration. Unfortunately, this feature may also encourage bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. To understand the mechanisms of bone tissue infection associated with contaminated biomaterials, a detailed understanding of bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation on biomaterial surfaces is needed. In this study, a continuous-flow modular reactor composed of several modular units placed in parallel was designed to evaluate the activity of circulating bacterial suspensions and thus their predilection for biofilm formation during 72 h of incubation. Hydroxyapatite discs were placed in each modular unit and then removed at fixed times to quantify biofilm accumulation. Biofilm formation on each replicate of material, unchanged in structure, morphology, or cell density, was reproducibly observed. The modular reactor therefore proved to be a useful tool for following mature biofilm formation on different surfaces and under conditions similar to those prevailing near human-bone implants.
    International Microbiology 09/2013; 16(3):191-8.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The movement for open access to science seeks to achieve unrestricted and free access to academic publications on the Internet. To this end, two mechanisms have been established: the gold road, in which scientific journals are openly accessible, and the green road, in which publications are self-archived in repositories. The publication of the Finch Report in 2012, advocating exclusively the adoption of the gold road, generated a debate as to whether either of the two options should be prioritized. The recommendations of the Finch Report stirred controversy among academicians specialized in open access issues, who felt that the role played by repositories was not adequately considered and because the green road places the burden of publishing costs basically on authors. The Finch Report's conclusions are compatible with the characteristics of science communication in the UK and they could surely also be applied to the (few) countries with a powerful publishing industry and substantial research funding. In Spain, both the current national legislation and the existing rules at universities largely advocate the green road. This is directly related to the structure of scientific communication in Spain, where many journals have little commercial significance, the system of charging a fee to authors has not been adopted, and there is a good repository infrastructure. As for open access policies, the performance of the scientific communication system in each country should be carefully analyzed to determine the most suitable open access strategy.
    International Microbiology 09/2013; 16(3):199-203.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A microcosm cultivation-based method was set up to investigate the growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), isolated from a water sample acquired at a depth of 50 m from the northern basin of Lake Kivu. For this purpose, both CARD-FISH and qPCR targeting of archaeal 16S rRNA and amoA genes were used. Archaeal cell growth at the end of the 246-day microcosm experiment accounted for 35% of the SybrGold-stained cells, which corresponded to 6.61 x 10(6) cells/ml and 1.76 +/- 0.09 x 10(6) archaeal 16S rRNA gene copies/ml. Clone libraries and DGGE fingerprinting confirmed the dominance of AOA phylotypes in the archaeal community microcosm. The majority of the identified archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences in the clone libraries were affiliated with Thaumarchaeota Marine Group 1 .1a. Subsequent cultivation of the AOA community on deep-well microtiter plates in medium containing different carbon sources to stimulate archaeal growth failed to show significant differences in archaeal abundance (ANOVA t14 = -1.058, P = 0.308 and ANOVA t14= 1.584, P = 0.135 for yeast extract and simple organic acids, respectively). The lack of growth stimulation by organic compounds is in concordance with the oligotrophic status of Lake Kivu. Finally, the addition of antibiotics to the growth medium resulted in archaeal cell counts that were significantly lower than those obtained from cultures in antibiotic-free medium (ANOVA t14 = 12.12, P < 0.001).
    International Microbiology 09/2013; 16(3):177-89.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bacteria, fungi, and plants have metabolic pathways for the utilization of nitrogen present in purine bases. In Klebsiella pneumoniae, the genes responsible for the assimilation of purine ring nitrogen are distributed in three separated clusters. We characterized the gene cluster involved in the metabolism of allantoate (genes KPN_01761 to KPN_01771). The functional assignments of HpxK, as an allantoate amidohydrolase, and of HpxU, as a regulator involved in the control of allantoate metabolism, were assessed experimentally. Gene hpxU encodes a repressor of the RpiR family that mediates the regulation of this system by allantoate. In this study, the binding of HpxU to the hpxF promoter and to the hpxU-hpxW intergenic region containing the divergent promoter for these genes was evidenced by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Allantoate released the HpxU repressor from its target operators whereas other purine intermediate metabolites, such as allantoin and oxamate, failed to induce complex dissociation. Sequence alignment of the four HpxU identified operators identified TGAA-N8-TTCA as the consensus motif recognized by the HpxU repressor.
    International Microbiology 09/2013; 16(3):165-76.
  • International Microbiology 06/2013; 16(2):125-32.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species are envisioned as promising vehicles for the mucosal delivery of therapeutic and prophylactic molecules, including the development of oral vaccines. In this study, we report on the expression of a synthetic nucleocapsid (NP) gene of influenza A virus in Lactobacillus casei. The NP gene was re-designed based on the tRNA pool and the codon usage preference of L. casei BL23. The codon-optimized NP gene was then cloned and expressed in L. casei RCEID02 under the control of a constitutive promoter, that of the lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene. The synthetic NP gene was further expressed in L. casei EM116 under the control of an inducible promoter, that of the structural gene of nisin (nisA) from Lactococcus lactis. Based on Western blot analysis, the specific protein band of NP, with a molecular mass of 56.0 kDa, was clearly detected in both expression systems. Thus, our study demonstrates the success of expressing a codon-optimized influenza A viral gene in L. casei. The suitability of the recombinant LAB strains for immunization purposes is currently under evaluation.
    International Microbiology 06/2013; 16(2):93-101.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable biocompatible polyesters, which accumulate as granules in the cytoplasm of many bacteria under unbalanced growth conditions. Medium-chain-length PHAs (mcl-PHAs), characterized by C6-C14 branched monomer chains and typically produced by Pseudomonas species, are promising thermoelastomers, as they can be further modified by introducing functional groups in the side chains. Functionalized PHAs are obtained either by feeding structurally related substrates processed through the beta-oxidation pathway, or using specific strains able to transform sugars or glycerol into unsaturated PHA by de novo fatty-acid biosynthesis. Functionalized mcl-PHAs provide modified mechanical and thermal properties, and consequently have new processing requirements and highly diverse potential applications in emergent fields such as biomedicine. However, process development and sample availability are limited due to the toxicity of some precursors and still low productivity, which hinder investigation. Conversely, improved mutant strains designed through systems biology approaches and cofeeding with low-cost substrates may contribute to the widespread application of these biopolymers. This review focuses on recent developments in the production of functionalized mcl-PHAs, placing particular emphasis on strain and bioprocess design for cost-effective production.
    International Microbiology 03/2013; 16(1):1-15.

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