JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY (J PLANT PATHOL )

Publisher: Società italiana di patologia vegetale

Description

The Journal of Plant Pathology (JPP) is the international journal of the Italian Phytopathological Society (S.I.Pa.V), covering fundamental and applied aspects of plant pathology. JPP will publish original contribution written in English, in the form of full-lenght papers, short communication, disease notes, and review articles on mycology, bacteriology, virology, physiological plant pathology, plant-parasite interactions, post-harvest diseases, non infectious diseases, and plant protection. All contributions will be peer reviewed under the supervision of an international Editorial Board. JPP is published quarterly.

  • Impact factor
    0.77
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.05
  • Cited half-life
    5.70
  • Immediacy index
    0.19
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.29
  • Website
    Journal of Plant Pathology website
  • Other titles
    JPP
  • ISSN
    1125-4653
  • OCLC
    36896358
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Among fungal plant pathogens Rhizoctonia solani (teleomorph Thanatephorus cucumeris) stands out for being a collective species composed by a number of infraspecific entities defined as anastomosis groups (AGs). Actually, as hyphal anastomoses are essential for nuclear exchange and heterokaryon formation, AGs represent genetically isolated and phylogenetically diverging entities that can be considered as true biological species. Moreover, the existence of subgroups and subsets of isolates displaying a lower anastomosis affinity with tester strains has been pointed out in several AGs. Within AG-2 five subgroups and a number of subsets have been described, including the quite puzzling AG-2-1/Nt that was first characterized on the basis of isolates recovered from tobacco in Italy and France displaying quite a reduced anastomosis affinity with AG-2-1 tester strains. Despite a high DNA-sequence homology, the peculiarity of subset Nt has been outlined by means of biochemical and molecular techniques, such as polygalacturonase isozymes, composition of whole-cell fatty acids, and RFLPs of rDNA-ITS. The availability in gene bank of ITS sequences has recently increased the possibility to identify isolates belonging to this grouping, and investigations carried out throughout Europe have evidenced a more widespread distribution. Particularly, besides the reported occurrence on tobacco, Nt- isolates have been found on pepper, bean, periwinkle and sugar beet in Italy, sugar beet in Spain, cauliflower in Belgium, potato in Great Britain, and again tobacco in Turkey. Therefore it appears that the pathogenic ability of AG-2-1/Nt is not restricted to tobacco, and that future investigations may disclose an even higher host range.
    JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 09/2014; 91(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala known as ‘torzella’ was in the past largely cultivated in southern Italy, then abandoned, and revaluated in recent years. In a farm in Scafati, where torzella was cropped for the first time, collar rot symptoms were observed on about 20% of the plants. Isolates of Rhizoctonia solani Kühn, showing the typical hyphal branching and multinucleate cells, were recovered from affected tissues. Determination of anastomosis groups was carried out by pairing isolates with tester strains on 2% water agar (WA) in Petri plates. Hyphal anastomosis was only observed with tester isolates of AG-4, producing both C2 and C3 reactions. Moreover, typical AG-4 isozyme patterns were obtained after polygalacturonase gel electrophoresis. The clonal condition of the isolates was also assessed by examining tuft formation in pairings on PDA supplemented with 0.5% activated charcoal. Finally, a biomolecular analysis was carried out by means of RFLPs of rDNA-ITS by using HincII and HpaI as restriction enzymes to assign torzella isolates to one of the three homogeneous groups (HG-I, -II and -III) so far characterized within R. solani AG-4. Pathogenicity test confirmed the ability of R. solani AG-4 isolates to induce collar rot. These isolates were recovered from symptomatic tissues, thus fulfilling Koch’s postulates.
    JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 09/2014; 92(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Several species and varieties of the family Crassulaceae have been introduced and cultivated for ornamental as well as medicinal purposes in Brazil, more prominently Cotyledon orbiculata (pig’s ear). This work reports the identification and characterization of viruses associated with foliar mosaic and distortion of C. orbiculata from the succulent plant collection of the garden of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. In situ analyses revealed enveloped bacilliform particles in the perinuclear space of infected C. orbiculata cells, and cytoplasmic cylindrical inclusions, typical of the family Potyviridae. Viruses were mechanically transmitted and separated by differential indicator hosts and aphid transmission (Myzus persicae). Chenopodium amaranticolor and Datura stramonium served as differential hosts for the potyvirus and the bacilliform virus, respectively. Positive serological reactions were obtained when leaf extracts from naturally infected C. orbiculata and experimental hosts were exposed to an antiserum to Sonchus yellow net virus (genus Nucleorhabdovirus). Identification of the potyvirus by RT-PCR, cloning into pGEM-T vector and sequencing generated a 1,752 nt fragment corresponding to part of the nuclear inclusion protein b (NIb), the complete coat protein (CP) and the untranslated region (UTR). Amino acid identities below 80% were observed, indicating that the potyvirus of C. orbiculata may be a new species for which the name Cotyledon virus Y (CotVY) is suggested.
    JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 01/2014; 96(1):143-149.
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    ABSTRACT: SUMMARY Tomato yellow leaf curl virus disease (TYLCVD) is the main limiting factor for tomato production in the Mediterranean Basin, and particularly in Tunisia where climatic and crop production conditions, as well as the occurrence of many weeds, provide suitable conditions for the presence and spread of TYLCVD all year round. In Tunisia, epidemics in tomato-growing regions have been associated with two begomoviruses: Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) but the presence of recombinants between them has never been investigated. A large-scale survey was conducted on leaves sampled from late-season tomato crops exhibiting severe curling symptoms, from beans, and from nine nearby weed species in the South and Sahel regions of Tunisia to investigate: (i) the natural occurrence of the TYLCV and TYLCSV species; (ii) the presence of the two recombinant types, RecA and RecB, derived from these species. Identification of TYLCV and TYLCSV was based on a multiplex PCR with primers generating a typical pattern on gels (750 bp and 366 bp fragments, respectively). Recombinants were identified by simplex PCR, which amplified the intergenic region, the most common recombination site described for begomoviruses, and sequencing. The occurrence of TYLCSV and TYLCV was confirmed in both Tunisian regions. Their co-existence was shown on tomato and in new weed species. This is the first time that recombinants between TYLCV and TYLCSV species showing 93% to 95% nucleotide identity with tomato yellow leaf curl recombinant viruses, are reported in Tunisia in tomato and black nightshade. Key words: Tomato, Begomovirus, TYLCV, TYLCSV, recombinant virus.
    JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 01/2014; 96 , 195-200(1):195-200.
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    ABSTRACT: In April 2014, typical symptoms of downy mildew were observed on fenugreek (Trigonella faenum-graecum) plants grown in the Tabas region (Iran). A white to dark-gray mycelim was visible on the lower surface of the leaves, associated with chlorotic spots on the upper leaf surface. Conidiophores were hyaline, they branched dichotomously 6 to 10 times and measured 270-510 (average: 432) μm in length. The slightly brown, oblong to ellipsoidal conidia measured 22.5-30×17.5-20 μm (average: 26.3x18.8 μm). Oospores were yellow-brown, globose, and measured 30-42.5 μm (average 34.5 μm), whereas oogonia were globose, subglobose to irregular, 45-65 μm (average: 57 μm) in diameter. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA was amplified using the primers ITS4/ITS5 and sequenced (GenBank accession No. KJ881163). BLAST analysis (Altschul et al., 1990) showed 100% similarity with the comparable sequence of Peronospora trigonellae (GenBank accession No. GQ421459). For pathogenicity tests, the foliage of healthy fenugreek plants was sprayed with a suspension of sporangia. Inoculated plants were incubated a moist chamber at 18-20°C and 80-90% relative humidity for two days, then moved into a greenhouse. Twelve days post inoculation, typical symptoms of mildew developed on the inoculated but not on the control plants, thus fulfilling Koch’s postulates. Downy mildew of fenugreek has previously been reported from Algeria, India, Pakistan, UK and USA (Rooney-Latham et al., 2009), but not from Iran where, to the best of our knowledge, this represents its first record.
    JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 01/2014; in press.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: SUMMARY Tomato yellow leaf curl virus disease (TYLCVD) is the main limiting factor for tomato production in the Mediterranean Basin, and particularly in Tunisia where climatic and crop production conditions, as well as the occurrence of many weeds, provide suitable conditions for the presence and spread of TYLCVD all year round. In Tunisia, epidemics in tomato-growing regions have been associated with two begomoviruses: Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) but the presence of recombinants between them has never been investigated. A large-scale survey was conducted on leaves sampled from late-season tomato crops exhibiting severe curling symptoms, from beans, and from nine nearby weed species in the South and Sahel regions of Tunisia to investigate: (i) the natural occurrence of the TYLCV and TYLCSV species; (ii) the presence of the two recombinant types, RecA and RecB, derived from these species. Identification of TYLCV and TYLCSV was based on a multiplex PCR with primers generating a typical pattern on gels (750 bp and 366 bp fragments, respectively). Recombinants were identified by simplex PCR, which amplified the intergenic region, the most common recombination site described for begomoviruses, and sequencing. The occurrence of TYLCSV and TYLCV was confirmed in both Tunisian regions. Their co-existence was shown on tomato and in new weed species. This is the first time that recombinants between TYLCV and TYLCSV species showing 93% to 95% nucleotide identity with tomato yellow leaf curl recombinant viruses, are reported in Tunisia in tomato and black nightshade. Key words: Tomato, Begomovirus, TYLCV, TYLCSV, recombinant virus.
    JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 01/2014; 96(1):195-196.
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    ABSTRACT: Iris yellow spot virus (IYSV) is an emerging pathogen of onion and other Allium crops worldwide. This study focused on the incidence, epidemiology and yield effects of IYSV in bulb onion crops in Spain. Surveys were conducted from 2005 to 2009. Samplings were performed in 101 onion fields with 2,677 onion plants tested in total. Onion transplants, winter onion crops and potential alternative hosts were also sampled. IYSV infection showed a temporal pattern of spread, and the proportion of sites with IYSV-infected plants began to increase rapidly after August. Two early infected fields were detected, and were the only ones with severe economic losses (50-60% crop reduction) due to IYSV. In both cases, onions were grown from IYSV- infected transplants imported from another region. There was no evidence that weeds and volunteer onion can act as alternative host. The use of virus (and vector)-free transplants must play an important role in IYSV management strategies by delaying early-season infection of onion in Spain.
    JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 01/2014; 1(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV), Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV) and Apple mosaic virus (ApMV) are common in apples and pears and the main targets of virus elimination from propagation material. The objective of this work was to design primers and probes for a real time RT-PCR protocol for detection of the four above viruses. FAM/TAMRA-labeled probes and primers were designed by searching for highly conserved nucleotide regions in the coat protein gene of the four viruses. Infection levels in analyzed apple samples were 92.6%, 96.4%, 100% and 88% for ASGV, ASPV, ACLSV and ApMV, respectively. In pears, all pre-existing ASPV infections were detected. Viral infections were confirmed in a selection of commercial cultivars of apples and pear scions, and quince rootstocks, demonstrating the sensitivity and reliability of the designed primers and probes. Real time RT-PCR using 5´-labeled probes is suitable for checking sanitary quality as a routine test in certification programs.
    JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 01/2014; v. 96(1):207-213.
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract In accordance with the mandatory control of Flavescence dorée (FD) in Italy, a monitoring programme for the presence of the phytoplasma agent of this disease and its vector Scaphoideus titanus Ball. was initiated in Apulia (southern Italy) since 2005. Surveys were carried out annually from June to October and, whenever observed, vines with yellows-like symptoms were tested by nested PCR. For vector catching, sticky traps were placed in a few vineyards and/or nurseries in each of the six Apulian provinces and replaced every two weeks, during the whole insect fly period (mid-June to late September). In 2013, 19 adults of a leafhopper with the morphological traits of S. titanus, as determined using the Douglas and Barnett (1976) key, were captured for the first time in Apulia, on traps exposed from mid August to mid September. The collected specimens were brought to the laboratory and 17 of them were tested individually by nested PCR for the presence of phytoplasmas. The insects were individually ground in CTAB-based buffer (Marzachì et al., 1998), aliquots (2 μl) of the recovered total nucleic acid were subjected to nested PCR using two pairs of generic primers (P1⁄P7, R16F2n⁄R16R2) that amplify phytoplasma 16S rDNA (Gundersen and Lee, 1996). No positive amplifications were obtained. The few vines with yellows-like symptoms present in some vineyards were PCR-positive but, after sequencing of their amplicons, proved to be infected by Candidatus Phytoplasma solani, the agent of Bois noir. Whereas Bois noir is known to occur in Apulia, though sporadically, S. titanus represents a new finding and a threatening one for the well-being of the local viticultural industry.
    JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 01/2014; 96(2):439.
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    ABSTRACT: Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, the causal agent of bacterial canker of Actinidia chinensis and A. deliciosa, is currently causing severe economic losses worldwide. A study was conducted to verify if a highly virulent Psa strain, isolated during the current outbreaks of bacterial canker of kiwifruit in Italy, produces phytotoxic metabolites in vitro. Culture filtrate, obtained from 14-day-old cells grown in Pseudomonas minimal medium, induced an evident hypersensitivity-like reaction to both tobacco and kiwifruit leaves. From culture filtrates, extracts were obtained using different solvents and pH values. The extracts and their corresponding aqueous phases, were further tested for phytotoxicity. Basic, hydrophilic, lowmolecular weight and hydrophilic, high-molecular weight compounds belonging to exopolysaccharides were isolated and analyzed. These compunds proved highly phytotoxic to kiwifruit, tobacco leaves and lemon fruits. Gas-chromatography- mass-spectrometry analysis carried out on crude exopolysaccharides showed glucose as the main monosaccharide constituent. These results suggest that phytotoxic metabolites, other than the antimetabolite phaseolotoxin, could be involved in the virulence of the pathogen to kiwifruit species.
    JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 01/2014;

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