Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology (Cult Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol )

Publisher: Educational Publishing Foundation; Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues, American Psychological Association

Description

Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology seeks to publish theoretical, conceptual, research and case study articles that promote the development of knowledge and understanding, application of psychological principles, and scholarly analysis of social-political forces affecting racial / ethnic minorities. Especially welcome are articles that (a) advance the contributions of psychology in the understanding of issues related to people of color through research, including the development of appropriate research paradigms; (b) promote the education and training of psychologists in matters regarding people of color, including the special issues relevant to the delivery of services to minority populations; and (c) advance the accumulation of knowledge related to diversity and multiculturalism, with particular attention to the wider society and the formation of public policy.

  • Impact factor
    1.36
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    6.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.06
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology website
  • Other titles
    Cultural diversity & ethnic minority psychology (Online), Cultural diversity & ethnic minority psychology, Cultural diversity and ethnic minority psychology, Cultural diversity and mental health
  • ISSN
    1099-9809
  • OCLC
    61313979
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

American Psychological Association

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print on a web-site
    • Pre-print must be labeled with date and accompanied with statement that paper has not (yet) been published
    • Copy of authors final peer-reviewed manuscript as accepted for publication
    • Post-print on author's web-site or employers server only, after acceptance
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to APA journal home page or article DOI
    • Article must include the following statement: 'This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.'
    • Publisher version cannot be used
    • APA will submit NIH author articles to PubMed Central, after author completion of form
    • Wellcome Trust authors may comply using Paid Option.
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: This study examined 1) the relative efficacy of a culturally-sensitive empowerment group intervention (Nia) aimed at increasing three protective factors—self-esteem, hopefulness, and effectiveness of obtaining resources—versus treatment as usual (TAU) for low-income, abused African American women who recently had attempted suicide and 2) the impact of participants’ readiness to change with regard to their abusive relationship and suicidal behavior on their levels of each protective factor in the two conditions. Methods: The sample included 89 African American women who reported intimate partner violence (IPV) exposure and a recent suicide attempt. Results: Multivariate general linear modeling revealed that those in Nia showed greater improvements in self-esteem, but not in hopefulness or effectiveness of obtaining resources. However, significant interactions emerged in which participants that were “less ready to change” (i.e., earlier in the stages of change process) their IPV situation and suicidal behavior endorsed greater levels of hopefulness and perceived effectiveness of obtaining resources, respectively, following Nia. Conclusion: Findings suggest that abused, suicidal African American women who are more reluctant initially to changing their abusive situation and suicidal behavior may benefit from even a brief, culturally-informed intervention.
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The current study examined whether a match or mismatch between teen mothers' cultural orientation and the cultural context of the family (i.e., familial ethnic socialization) predicted mother-daughter everyday and coparenting conflict, and in turn, teen mothers' adjustment. Participants were 204 Mexican-origin teen mothers (M age = 16.81 years; SD = 1.00). Consistent with a person-environment fit perspective, findings indicated that a mismatch between teen mothers' cultural orientation (i.e., high mainstream cultural involvement) and the cultural context of the family (i.e., higher levels of familial ethnic socialization) predicted greater mother-daughter everyday conflict and coparenting conflict 1 year later. However, when there was a match (i.e., high levels of familial ethnic socialization for teen mothers with high Mexican orientation), familial ethnic socialization was not associated with mother-daughter conflict. In addition, mother-daughter conflict was positively associated with depressive symptoms and engagement in risky behaviors 1 year later among all teen mothers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The current study examined whether writing content related to self-enhancing (viz., downward social comparison and situational attributions) and self-improving (viz., upward social comparison and persistence) motivations were differentially related to expressive writing outcomes among 17 Asian American and 17 European American participants. Content analysis of the essays revealed no significant cultural group differences in the likelihood of engaging in self-enhancing versus self-improving reflections on negative personal experiences. However, cultural group differences were apparent in the relation between self-motivation processes and changes in anxiety and depressive symptoms at 3-month follow-up. Among European Americans, writing that reflected downward social comparison predicted positive outcomes, whereas persistence writing themes were related to poorer outcomes. For Asian Americans, writing about persistence was related to positive outcomes, whereas downward social comparison and situational attributions predicted poorer outcomes. Findings provide evidence suggesting culturally distinct mechanisms for the effects of expressive disclosure. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Two correlational studies investigated the joint effect of bias awareness-a new individual difference measure that assesses Whites' awareness and concern about their propensity to be biased-and prejudice on Whites' intergroup anxiety and intended intergroup contact. Using a community sample (Study 1), we found the predicted Bias Awareness × Prejudice interaction. Prejudice was more strongly related to interracial anxiety among those high (vs. low) in bias awareness. Study 2 investigated potential behavioral consequences in an important real world context: medical students' intentions for working primarily with minority patients. Study 2 replicated the Bias Awareness × Prejudice interaction and further demonstrated that interracial anxiety mediated medical students' intentions to work with minority populations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The present study adopted a within-country approach to investigate the relation of cultural distance to general creativity and math creativity in Taiwan. First, we conducted a pilot study of 201 young adolescents with parents from one of the 3 largest subethnic groups in Taiwan, namely Min-nan Taiwanese, Ha-kka Taiwanese, and Outside-Province Taiwanese. The results revealed that young Taiwanese adolescents perceived the cultural distance between Min-nan Taiwanese and Outside-Province Taiwanese as larger than the cultural distance between the other subethnic groups. The main study revealed that 610 young adolescents from large cultural distance families (i.e., those comprising 1 Min-nan Taiwanese parent and 1 Outside-Province Taiwanese parent) outperformed those from small cultural distance families (i.e., those comprising 2 Min-nan Taiwanese parents, and those comprising 1 Min-nan Taiwanese parent and 1 Ha-kka Taiwanese parent) on both general creativity and math creativity. This pattern remained even after controlling for family socioeconomic status, parents' education level, and adolescents' school mathematical performance. Implications and limitations are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Latino immigrants live in an increasingly global world in which maintaining contact with kin in the home country is easier than ever. We examined (a) the annual distribution of remittances burden (percentage of remittances/household income) and visits to the home country, (b) the association of these transnational ties with a past-year major depressive episode (MDE), and (c) moderation by Latino subethnicity or gender. We conducted weighted logistic regression analyses with the Latino immigrant subsample (N = 1,614) of the National Latino and Asian American Study. Mexican and Other Latino immigrants had greater remittances burden than Puerto Rican migrants. Cuban immigrants made the fewest visits back home. After adjustment for sociodemographics and premigration psychiatric history, remittances burden decreased odds of MDE (odds ratio [OR] = 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.67, .0.98]), whereas visits back home increased odds of MDE (OR = 1.04, 95% CI [1.01, 1.06]). Latino subethnicity was not a significant moderator. Visits back home were more strongly linked to depression among women than men. The distribution of transnational ties differs by Latino subgroup, although its association with depression is similar across groups. Monetary giving through remittances might promote a greater sense of self-efficacy, and caregiving for relatives back home that positively affect mental health. Visits back home, especially for women, might signal social stress from strained relationships with kin, spouses, or children left behind, or increased caregiving demands that negatively affect mental health. Clinical practice with immigrants should routinely assess the social resources and strains that fall outside national borders. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present longitudinal study examined the complex role of race-including racial attitudes and visual representations of race-in White Americans' responses to Obama during the 2008 U.S. presidential election. Consistent with prior research, participants who perceived Obama as darker skinned were less likely to vote for him and generally evaluated Obama less positively. It is important to note, however, that these effects were stronger among Whites with more egalitarian expressed racial attitudes. Moreover, this pattern occurred over and above effects of political orientation and remained stable over a 2-month period, including pre- and postelection. Implications of these findings for understanding the complex and persistent influence of race in politics are considered. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aboriginal peoples are at greater risk of experiencing early life adversity relative to non-Aboriginal peoples in Canada, and as adults frequently experience high levels of discrimination that act as a further stressor. Although these factors appear to contribute to high rates of depressive disorders and suicidality in Aboriginal peoples, the psychosocial factors that contribute to the relationship between childhood adversity and the development of depressive symptoms have hardly been assessed in this group. The present investigation explored potential mediators to help explain the relation between childhood trauma and depressive symptoms among a sample of First Nations adults from across Canada. These mediated relationships were further examined in the context of unsupportive social interactions from ingroup and outgroup members. In Study 1, (N = 225), the relationship between childhood trauma and depression scores was mediated by perceived discrimination, and this was particularly notable in the presence of unsupportive relations with outgroup members. In Study 2, (N = 134) the relationship between childhood trauma and depressive symptoms was mediated by emotion-focused coping that was specific to coping with experiences of ethnic discrimination, and this mediated effect was moderated by both outgroup and ingroup unsupportive social interactions. Thus, it seems that experiences of discrimination and unsupport might contribute to depressive symptoms among First Nations adults who had experienced early life adverse events. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 08/2014;
  • Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 05/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: White Americans' willingness to engage in dialogues about intergroup commonalities and power inequalities with Asian and African Americans were examined in two experiments. Because Whites perceive that African Americans experience greater discrimination than do Asian Americans, we predicted that they would be more willing to engage in dialogues that would interrogate injustice and inequality with them. We also explored the role of common ingroup identity (as Americans) on willingness for dialogue about inequality. In both studies, Whites were less interested in engaging in power talk with Asian Americans than with African Americans, but the difference in willingness for commonality talk was smaller. Asian Americans were perceived as experiencing lower levels of discrimination (Studies 1 and 2) and identify less with America (Study 2) both of which predicted lower willingness for power talk with them. Common ingroup identity manipulations had marginal effects on willingness for power talk with African Americans and no effect on power talk with Asian Americans. Implications for improving social disparities between various groups were discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The white male norm hypothesis (Zárate & Smith, 1990) posits that White men's race and gender go overlooked as a result of their prototypical social statuses. In contrast, the intersectional invisibility hypothesis (Purdie-Vaughns & Eibach, 2008) posits that people with membership in multiple subordinate social groups experience social invisibility as a result of their non-prototypical social statuses. The present research reconciles these contradictory theories and provides empirical support for the core assumption of the intersectional invisibility hypothesis-that intersectional targets are non-prototypical within their race and gender ingroups. In a speeded categorization task, participants were slower to associate Black women versus Black men with the category "Black" and slower to associate Black women versus White women with the category "woman." We discuss the implications of this work for social categorical theory development and future intersectionality research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Reviews the book, Internationalizing Multiculturalism: Expanding Professional Competencies in a Globalized World by Rodney Lowman (see record 2012-22250-000). The purpose of this edited volume is to explore the possibilities of first broadening multiculturalism (MC), and second, demonstrating the mutual benefit and synergy of MC and internationalism (INT). Overall, this volume has convincingly delivered its central message, namely that it is high time that MC go international- to be the agent of change, and be changed in the process. This edited volume is well organized to cover both theory and practice, and is written in a style that is personable and accessible. This is a book suitable for a wide range of audience. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 04/2014; 20(2):303-5.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We conducted a 3-wave, longitudinal study to examine the role of ethnic collective self-esteem and United States (U.S.) collective self-esteem on anxious-depressed symptoms over time among Asian and Latino immigrant-origin adolescents (n = 171). Growth curve analysis revealed that anxious-depressed symptoms first decreased between 10th and 11th grade and then increased over time for both groups. Additionally higher levels of ethnic collective self-esteem were associated with lower levels of anxious-depressed symptoms only for Asian adolescents. There was a differing pattern for U.S. collective self-esteem such that for Latino adolescents, higher U.S. collective self-esteem was associated with higher anxious-depressed symptoms, whereas for Asian adolescents there was an inverse relationship with anxious-depressed symptoms. The results expand the literature on ethnic and U.S. collective self-esteem and their link to mental health. Implications of the findings for research in general, and for counseling immigrant youth and families in particular, are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 04/2014; 20(2):220-30.
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    ABSTRACT: Although several theoretical notions have been proposed predicting a relationship between acculturation orientation and juvenile delinquency, the available empirical research is scarce and limited. To extend former research, in this study, we used latent class analyses to compare bidimensional psychological acculturation orientation of Moroccan immigrant boys in pretrial detention with those of Moroccan boys in the general population. We also examined their parents' acculturation orientation. We found that boys in pretrial detention were clearly overrepresented in the integrated psychological acculturation class and underrepresented in the separated psychological acculturation class when we compared them with the boys in the general population. Highly similar results were found for their parents. In contrast, boys in pretrial detention were as likely to be faced with an intergenerational acculturation gap as boys from the general population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 04/2014; 20(2):254-65.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Reviews the book, The Psychology of Prejudice: From Attitudes to Social Action by Lynne M. Jackson (see record 2010-19894-000). This book provides a comprehensive exploration of the psychological underpinnings of prejudice and the process of moving toward collective action and social justice efforts. Jackson successfully takes on the ambitious task of exploring prejudice through the lens of various theories, ranging from earlier ideologies such as social dominance theory and system justification theory to more current neurological understandings of prejudice and the role of the amygdala. This book would be useful for research scholars as well as specialized graduate and undergraduate courses that address prejudice, oppression, and social justice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 04/2014; 20(2):302-3.

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