Phytotherapy Research (Phytother Res )

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

Description

Phytotherapy Research is a bimonthly plus two additional issues international journal for the publication of original medical plant research including biochemistry and molecular pharmacology toxicology pathology and the clinical applications of herbs and natural products to both human and animal medicine. Papers are also published concerning chemical and botanical identification of herbs or their products where such information contributes to the overall safety of plant based medicines currently in use. Papers and communications concerned solely with the identification and structure elucidation of natural products will only be considered where the work contributes directly to the understanding of the use of the plant as a medicine. Phytotherapy Research publishes full-length original research papers short communications reviews and letters on medicinal plant research. Clincal papers on the applications of herbs and natural products to both human and animal medicine may vary from case histories to full clinical trials. Papers concerned with the effects of common food ingredients and standardised plant extracts including commercial products are welcome as are mechanistic studies on isolated natural products. Phytotherapy Research does not publish purely agricultural phytochemical structure elucidation and identification papers unless pertinent to the pharmacological effects or overall safety of plant based medicines currently in use. Papers dealing with the pharmacology and screening of crude extracts often deal with local medicinal plants and are of only limited interest to an international readership. Therefore please consider carefully whether your paper would be more appropriate to a national journal before sending it to Phytotherapy Research . Crude extract papers will still be considered for publication as short communications but only if they are a single published page in length (equivalent to 600 words to include due allowance for any illustrations). Longer manuscripts will be returned without being reviewed .

  • Impact factor
    2.07
  • 5-year impact
    2.44
  • Cited half-life
    6.60
  • Immediacy index
    0.44
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.49
  • Website
    Phytotherapy Research website
  • Other titles
    Phytotherapy research (Online), Phytotherapy research, PTR
  • ISSN
    1099-1573
  • OCLC
    44085665
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

John Wiley & Sons

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • On personal web site or secure external website at authors institution
    • Not allowed on institutional repository
    • JASIST authors may deposit in an institutional repository
    • Non-commercial
    • Pre-print must be accompanied with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'John Wiley and Sons' is an imprint of 'Wiley-Blackwell'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The L-sulforaphane (SFN) component of broccoli sprout showed anticancer activity in several preclinical studies including breast cancer. Estrogens are considered major risk factors in breast carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SFN on the expression of cytochrome P450 involved in the estrogen metabolism in breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 and in non-tumorigenic MCF10A cell line. The expression of CYP19, CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1 was determined at the transcript and protein levels. There were found some remarkable differences in the effect of SFN at a dose of 5 µmol/L on CYP19 expression: in ER(+) MCF7 significant reduction, in ER(-) MDA-MB-231 an increased expression and unchanged expression in MCF10A cell line. The effect of SFN on CYPs (1A1, 1A2, 1B1) involved in estrogen catabolism was to a lesser extent dependent on breast cell line. The slightly reduced CYP1A1 protein level was observed in all cell lines tested. An increased level of CYP1A2 and decreased level of CYP1B1 expression were found in MCF10A. These results indicate that the naturally occurring L isomer of SFN may affect the expression of P450s involved in estrogen metabolism. This effect may contribute to the anticancer activity of SFN in breast tissue. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Jasin-hwan-gagambang (BHH10), a modified prescription of Jasin-hwan, contains Astragalus membranaceus, Cinnamomum cassia, and Phellodendron amurense, and it has been traditionally used to treat osteoporosis and other inflammatory diseases. In this study, we systematically investigated the protective effects of BHH10 in ovariectomy (OVX)-induced rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham and OVX subgroups. The rats in the OVX group were treated with vehicle, BHH10, alendronate (ALN), and 17β-estradiol (E2). BHH10 treatment significantly inhibited OVX-induced increases in body weight and uterus atrophy. In addition, it significantly increased the bone mineral density (BMD) and prevented a decrease in trabecular bone volume, connectivity density, trabecular number, thickness, and separation at the total femur and femur neck. The OVX rats showed significant decreases in the serum levels of calcium and phosphorous and significant increases in the serum levels of cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, C-telopeptide type 1 collagen, and bone morphogenetic protein-2. These changes were significantly reduced to near sham levels by administration of BHH10 to OVX rats. BHH10-treated rats had a greater bone mass, a better structural architecture of the bone, and higher levels of biochemical markers of the bone than did the ALN-treated or E2-treated rats. These results suggest that BHH10 reverses osteoporosis in OVX rats by stimulating bone formation or regulating bone resorption and is not associated with toxicity. © 2014 The Authors. Phytotherapy Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Phellodendron amurense bark extract (Nexrutine®) has shown a favorable effect on prostate cancer in vivo and in vitro. We evaluated its tolerance in patients undergoing surgery or radiation for prostate cancer. Patients received Nexrutine® orally (500 mg tid) either 1 to 2 months preoperatively or 1 to 2 months prior to and with radiation therapy. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were used to measure tolerance. In total, 21 patients (9 surgery and 12 radiation) underwent treatment. During the Nexrutine® alone component, there were two transient grade 3 toxicities (hypokalemia and urinary incontinence). There was no grade 4 toxicity. For the combined Nexrutine® and radiation component, no additional patients suffered a grade 3 toxicity. All the toxicities were transient. By the end of the neoadjuvant treatment, 81% of the patients had a decline in prostate-specific antigen. This is the first report of patients with prostate cancer being treated with P. amurense bark extract, and it was very well tolerated. Toxicities were minimal and self-limited. This compound can be safely used in further evaluation of a treatment effect on cancer. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In traditional oriental medicine, apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) seed has been used to treat skin diseases such as furuncle, acne vulgaris and dandruff, as well as coughing, asthma and constipation. This study describes the phytochemical profile and antimicrobial potential of the essential oil obtained from apricot seeds (Armeniacae Semen). The essential oil isolated by hydrodistillation was analysed by gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy. Benzaldehyde (90.6%), mandelonitrile (5.2%) and benzoic acid (4.1%) were identified. Disc diffusion, agar dilution and gaseous contact methods were performed to determine the antimicrobial activity against 16 bacteria and two yeast species. The minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged from 250 to 4000, 500 to 2000 and 250 to 1000 µg/mL for Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and yeast strains, respectively. The minimum inhibitory doses by gaseous contact ranged from 12.5 to 50, 12.5 to 50 and 3.13 to 12.5 mg/L air for Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and yeast strains, respectively. The essential oil exhibited a variable degree of antimicrobial activity against a range of bacteria and yeasts tested. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Stingless bees accumulate deposits of plant resins that are mixed with beeswax to produce propolis. Previous studies have reported anti-microbial constituents of stingless bee (Tetragonula carbonaria) propolis from East Australia, but several components remained to be characterized. In the search of natural products yet unreported for Australian propolis, four bee deposit-resins of T. carbonaria bees were analysed by gas and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with accurate mass measurements. Ethanolic extracts of the deposit-resins were tested in vitro against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25983 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 by the agar diffusion method. Phloroglucinols, flavonoids and isoprenoids were identified in samples. The crude extracts showed strong anti-staphylococcal effects but were less active against the Gram-negative bacterium. The diagnostic data enabled the identification of markers that can be used for profiling other Australian propolis sources and to target the isolation of bioactive phloroglucinols in future studies against antibiotic resistant S. aureus strains. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Essential oils are mainly administered by inhalation. Administration by inhalation is considered to occur through two pathways, neurological transfer and pharmacological transfer. However, the relationship between the two routes is not clear. To clarify this relationship, we administered α-pinene, which has an anxiolytic-like effect, to mice. Emotional behavior and accumulation and expression of relevant mRNAs in the brain (brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)) were examined following inhaled administration of α-pinene (10 μL/L air for 60 or 90 min). To evaluate the anxiolytic-like effect, the elevated plus maze (EPM) test was used. Inhalation of α-pinene for 60 min produced a significant increase in the total distance traveled in the EPM test compared with control (water). The concentration of α-pinene in the brain after 60 min of inhalation was significantly increased compared with that after 90 min of inhalation. The expression of BDNF mRNA in the olfactory bulb and in the hippocampus was almost the same after 60 min of inhalation compared to that after 90 min of inhalation. The expression of TH mRNA in the midbrain after 60 min of inhalation was significantly increased compared with that of the control. Thus, an increase in α-pinene in the brain induces an increase in TH mRNA expression and increases locomotor activity. The anxiolytic-like effect may be related to both neurological transfer and pharmacological transfer. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Kahweol, the coffee-specific deterpene, has been shown to have potential anti-cancer effects against several cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer activity of kahweol have not yet established. In this study, we investigated whether kahweol could show anti-cancer effects on oral squamous cell lines (OSCCs), HN22 and HSC4. We conducted an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay, 4′-6-diamidino2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, propidium iodide staining, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot analysis for the characterization of kahweol and the underlying signaling pathway. We determined that kahweol-treated cells showed significantly decreased cell viability and increased nuclear condensation and an increased sub-G1 population in OSCCs. Interestingly, suppression of the transcription factor specificity protein 1 (Sp1) was followed by induced apoptosis by kahweol in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, kahweol modulated the protein expression level of the Sp1 regulatory genes including cell cycle regulatory proteins and anti-apoptotic proteins, resulting in apoptosis. Taken together, results from these findings suggest that kahweol may be a potential anti-cancer drug candidate to induce apoptotic cell death through downregulation of Sp1 in OSCCs. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the modulating effect of Panax ginseng extract (PGE) on radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) by measuring early changes in oxidative stress levels, cytokine expression, and the histopathology of mouse lung tissue treated with high dose of X-ray radiation. The mice were pretreated with 25, 50, and 100-mg/kg doses of PGE orally for four consecutive days, and their thoraces were then exposed to 15-Gy X-ray radiation 1 h after the last administration of PGE on day 4. The pretreatments with 50 and 100 mg/kg PGE led to significant reductions in the elevation of lipid peroxidation levels at 2 and 10 days, respectively, after irradiation. The mice pretreated with PGE exhibited dose-dependent reductions in the irradiation-induced production of tumor necrosis factor α and transforming growth factor β1 cytokines 10 days after irradiation, with these reductions nearly reaching the control levels after the 100-mg/kg dose. Furthermore, together with providing significant protection against reductions in catalase activity and glutathione content, pretreatment with 100 mg/kg PGE resulted in a marked attenuation of the severity of inflammatory changes in lung tissue 10 days after irradiation. A high pretreatment dose of PGE may be a useful pharmacological approach for protection against RILI. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 09/2014;
  • Xiao‐Dan Yu, Jian‐Hui Xie, Yong‐Hong Wang, Yu‐Cui Li, Zhi‐Zhun Mo, Yi‐Feng Zheng, Ji‐Yan Su, Ye‐er Liang, Jin‐Zhi Liang, Zi‐Ren Su, Ping Huang
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to evaluate the antibacterial activity and urease inhibitory effects of patchouli alcohol (PA), the bioactive ingredient isolated from Pogostemonis Herba, which has been widely used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The activities of PA against selected bacteria and fungi were determined by agar dilution method. It was demonstrated that PA exhibited selective antibacterial activity against Helicobacter pylori, without influencing the major normal gastrointestinal bacteria. Noticeably, the antibacterial activity of PA was superior to that of amoxicillin, with minimal inhibition concentration value of 78 µg/mL. On the other hand, PA inhibited ureases from H. pylori and jack bean in concentration-dependent fashion with IC50 values of 2.67 ± 0.79 mM and 2.99 ± 0.41 mM, respectively. Lineweaver-Burk plots indicated that the type of inhibition was non-competitive against H. pylori urease whereas uncompetitive against jack bean urease. Reactivation of PA-inactivated urease assay showed DL-dithiothreitol, the thiol reagent, synergistically inactivated urease with PA instead of enzymatic activity recovery. In conclusion, the selective H. pylori antibacterial activity along with urease inhibitory potential of PA could make it a possible drug candidate for the treatment of H. pylori infection. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: When herbal drugs and conventional allopathic drugs are used together, they can interact in our body which can lead to the potential for herb–drug interactions. This work was conducted to evaluate the herb–drug interaction potential of caffeic acid and quercetin mediated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition. Human liver microsomes (HLMs) were added to each selective probe substrates of cytochrome P450 enzymes with or without of caffeic acid and quercetin. IC50, Ki values, and the types of inhibition were determined. Both caffeic acid and quercetin were potent competitive inhibitors of CYP1A2 (Ki = 1.16 and 0.93 μM, respectively) and CYP2C9 (Ki = 0.95 and 1.67 μM, respectively). Caffeic acid was a potent competitive inhibitor of CYP2D6 (Ki = 1.10 μM) and a weak inhibitor of CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 (IC50 > 100 μM). Quercetin was a potent competitive inhibitor of CYP 2C19 and CYP3A4 (Ki = 1.74 and 4.12 μM, respectively) and a moderate competitive inhibitor of CYP2D6 (Ki = 18.72 μM). These findings might be helpful for safe and effective use of polyphenols in clinical practice. Our data indicated that it is necessary to study the in vivo interactions between drugs and pharmaceuticals with dietary polyphenols. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Herbal medicines and dietary supplements are commonly taken by patients with cancer, leading to concern over interactions with conventional medicines. A literature search was carried out to identify published studies exploring supplement use by patients with a cancer diagnosis. A total of 818 articles were retrieved using the key words, but only 41 are judged to be relevant based on title. Following the review of the abstracts, ten papers were considered to be potentially relevant, but of these, only two met the selection criteria, and three additional papers were identified from published reviews. Of 806 patients surveyed, 433 (53.7%) were reported to be taking combinations of supplements and drugs, and 167 incidents of risk were identified, affecting 60 patients (13.9%). The interactions identified were mainly theoretical and not supported by clinical data. No studies reported any adverse events associated with these combinations; most did not record the actual drug combinations taken, and the risk potential of some supplements appears to have been over-estimated. More effort should be made to investigate supplement use in this vulnerable patient group, based on sound evidence of plausible interaction, not only to avoid harm but also to provide reassurance where appropriate if the patient wishes to take a particular supplement. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to evaluate the pro-apoptotic effects of polysaccharides derived from Lentinus edodes and further elucidated the mechanisms of this action. Our results demonstrated that marked morphological changes of apoptosis were observed after treatment of L. edodes polysaccharides [Lentinan (LTN)]. Moreover, LTN-induced cell apoptosis was characterized by a rapid stimulation of reactive oxygen species production, the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in intracellular concentration of Ca(2+) . In addition, the results of the haematoxylin and eosin and TUNEL assay further confirmed that LTN-induced apoptosis in vivo. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis showed that LTN could arrest the cell cycle at G2/M phase, and immunofluorescence showed LTN caused disruption of microtubule. These results suggest that disruption of cellular microtubule network, arrest of the cell cycle at G2/M phase and induction of apoptosis may be one of the possible mechanisms of anti-tumour effect of LTN. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Metabolomics provides an opportunity to develop the systematic analysis of the metabolites and has been applied to discovering biomarkers and perturbed pathways which can clarify the action mechanism of traditional Chinese medicines (TCM). TCM is a comprehensive system of medical practice that has been used to diagnose, treat, and prevent illnesses more than 3000 years. Metabolomics represents a powerful approach that provides a dynamic picture of the phenotype of biosystems through the study of endogenous metabolites, and its methods resemble those of TCM. Recently, metabolomics tools have been used for facilitating interactional effects of both Western medicine and TCM. We describe a protocol for investigating that how metabolomics can be used to open up ‘dialogue’ between Chinese and Western medicine, facilitate lead compound discovery and development from TCM. Metabolomics will bridge the cultural gap between TCM and Western medicine and improve development of integrative medicine, and maximally benefiting the human.
    Phytotherapy Research 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the primary factor in skin photoaging, which is characterized by wrinkle formation, dryness, and thickening. The mechanisms underlying skin photoaging are closely associated with degradation of collagen via upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, which is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Gallic acid (GA), a phenolic compound, possesses a variety of biological activities including antioxidant and antiinflammatory activities. We investigated the protective effects of GA against photoaging caused by UVB irradiation using normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) in vitro and hairless mice in vivo. The production levels of ROS, interlukin-6, and MMP-1 were significantly suppressed, and type I procollagen expression was stimulated in UVB-irradiated and GA-treated NHDFs. GA treatment inhibited the activity of transcription factor activation protein 1. The effects of GA following topical application and dietary administration were examined by measuring wrinkle formation, histological modification, protein expression, and physiological changes such as stratum corneum hydration, transepidermal water loss, and erythema index. We found that GA decreased dryness, skin thickness, and wrinkle formation via negative modulation of MMP-1 secretion and positive regulation of elastin, type I procollagen, and transforming growth factor-β1. Our data indicate that GA is a potential candidate for the prevention of UVB-induced premature skin aging. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Heracleum persicum Desf. Ex Fischer (Apiaceae) is a native medicinal plant in the Iranian traditional medicine and also a safe and common dietary spice. The present pilot study aimed to investigate the impact of supplementation with H. persicum fruits on serum lipid concentrations in a group of patients with minimal coronary artery disease. Subjects who were diagnosed with <50% luminal narrowing in any of the major coronary arteries in coronary angiography were recruited for this trial and were randomized to receive either H. persicum hydroalcoholic fruit extract (n = 15; 300 mg/day) or placebo (n = 12) for a period of 6 months. Serum concentrations of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were measured at baseline and at the end of study. No significant difference in concentrations of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was observed between H. persicum extract and placebo groups (p > 0.05). However, serum triglycerides levels were reduced after H. persicum extract supplementation in a borderline significant manner (p = 0.063). Short-term supplementation with H. persicum fruit extract might be used as an adjunctive treatment for patients with hypertriglyceridemia. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Current conventional treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD) are aimed at symptom management, as there is currently no known cure or treatment that can slow down its progression. Ayurveda, the ancient medical system of India, uses a combination of herbs to combat the disease. Herbs commonly used for this purpose are Zandopa (containing Mucuna pruriens), Withania somnifera, Centella asiatica, Sida cordifolia and Bacopa monnieri. In this study, these herbs were tested for their potential ability to improve climbing ability of a fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) PD model based on loss of function of phosphatase and tensin-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1). Fruit flies were cultured on food containing individual herbs or herbal formulations, a combination of all five herbs, levodopa (positive control) or no treatment (negative control). Tests were performed in both PINK1 mutant flies and healthy wild-type (WT) flies. A significant improvement in climbing ability was observed in flies treated with B. monnieri compared with untreated PINK1 mutant flies. However, a significant decrease in climbing ability was observed in WT flies for the same herb. Centella asiatica also significantly decreased climbing ability in WT flies. No significant effects were observed with any of the other herbs in either PINK1 or WT flies compared with untreated flies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Different members of Lagochilus genus have been used in folkloric medicine to treat hemorrhages and inflammation. However, only a few species of them have received scientific attention supporting their efficacy. Here, the hemostatic and antiinflammatory activities of five Lagochilus species were determined and compared by using in vivo assays. The results showed that the extracts of Lagochilus lanatonodus and Lagochilus diacanthophyllus showed better hemostatic activities among five species. The high doses of L. lanatonodus extracts were able to shorten the values of thrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time in a rat model. Moreover, the extracts of L. lanatonodus and L. diacanthophyllus showed strong inhibitory effects on the acute phase of inflammation in both xylene-induced ear edema mouse model and carrageenan-induced paw edema rat model. In parallel, the treatment of these extracts modulated the expressions of those inflammatory parameters, that is, nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase. L. lanatonodus and L. diacanthophyllus showed better hemostatic and antiinflammatory activities in several test models: these results therefore supported the folkloric utilization. L. lanatonodus was found to be the most active Lagochilus species. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to observe the effect of the Rhodiola crenulata extracts on gut immunity of Drosophila melanogaster. Wild-type flies fed standard cornmeal–yeast medium were used as controls. Experimental groups were supplemented with 2.5% R. crenulata aqueous extracts in standard medium. Survival rate was determined by feeding pathogenic microorganisms and toxic compounds. The levels of reactive oxygen species and dead cells were detected by dihydroethidium and 7-amino-actinomycin D staining, respectively. The expression of antimicrobial peptides was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and morphological change of the intestine was imaged by an Axioskop 2 plus microscope. The results demonstrate that R. crenulata increased the survival rates of adult flies and expression of antimicrobial peptide genes after pathogen or toxic compound ingestion. Moreover, decreased levels of reactive oxygen species and epithelial cell death were associated with results in improved intestinal morphology. The pharmacological action of R. crenulata from Tibet was greater than that from Sichuan. These results indicate that the R. crenulata extracts from Tibet had better pharmacological effect on D. melanogaster gut immunity after ingestion of pathogens and toxic compounds. These results may provide the pharmacological basis for prevention of inflammatory diseases of the intestine. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Human studies of curcumin extract on lipid-lowering effect have not been completely investigated and have had controversy results. This study tested the effect of daily curcumin extract for 12 weeks on weight, glucose, and lipid profiles in patients with metabolic syndrome. Sixty-five patients were randomized into two groups; 33 patients taking curcumin extract capsule (630 mg thrice daily) and 32 patients taking a placebo capsule thrice daily for 12 weeks. At 12 weeks after the curcumin extract consumption, the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) significantly increased from 40.96 ± 8.59 to 43.76 ± 2.79 mg/dL (p < 0.05), and the level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) was significantly reduced (120.55 ± 36.81 to 106.51 ± 25.02 mg/dL, p < 0.05). The triglyceride-lowering effect, a reduction of 65 mg/dL, was also found in this study. In subgroups analysis, the consumption of curcumin may have a lowering cholesterol effect in male patients and an increasing HDL-C effect in female patients, both of which result in a decrease of T-Chol/HDL-C ratio. The intake of the curcumin extract of 1890 mg/day for 12 weeks was associated with lipid-lowering effect but did not improve weight and glucose homeostasis in the patients with metabolic syndrome. Daily curcumin consumption may be an alternative choice to modify cholesterol-related parameters, especially in metabolic syndrome patients. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 08/2014;

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