Phytotherapy Research (Phytother Res )

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

Description

Phytotherapy Research is a bimonthly plus two additional issues international journal for the publication of original medical plant research including biochemistry and molecular pharmacology toxicology pathology and the clinical applications of herbs and natural products to both human and animal medicine. Papers are also published concerning chemical and botanical identification of herbs or their products where such information contributes to the overall safety of plant based medicines currently in use. Papers and communications concerned solely with the identification and structure elucidation of natural products will only be considered where the work contributes directly to the understanding of the use of the plant as a medicine. Phytotherapy Research publishes full-length original research papers short communications reviews and letters on medicinal plant research. Clincal papers on the applications of herbs and natural products to both human and animal medicine may vary from case histories to full clinical trials. Papers concerned with the effects of common food ingredients and standardised plant extracts including commercial products are welcome as are mechanistic studies on isolated natural products. Phytotherapy Research does not publish purely agricultural phytochemical structure elucidation and identification papers unless pertinent to the pharmacological effects or overall safety of plant based medicines currently in use. Papers dealing with the pharmacology and screening of crude extracts often deal with local medicinal plants and are of only limited interest to an international readership. Therefore please consider carefully whether your paper would be more appropriate to a national journal before sending it to Phytotherapy Research . Crude extract papers will still be considered for publication as short communications but only if they are a single published page in length (equivalent to 600 words to include due allowance for any illustrations). Longer manuscripts will be returned without being reviewed .

  • Impact factor
    2.07
  • 5-year impact
    2.44
  • Cited half-life
    6.60
  • Immediacy index
    0.44
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.49
  • Website
    Phytotherapy Research website
  • Other titles
    Phytotherapy research (Online), Phytotherapy research, PTR
  • ISSN
    1099-1573
  • OCLC
    44085665
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

John Wiley & Sons

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • On personal web site or secure external website at authors institution
    • Not allowed on institutional repository
    • JASIST authors may deposit in an institutional repository
    • Non-commercial
    • Pre-print must be accompanied with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'John Wiley and Sons' is an imprint of 'Wiley-Blackwell'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We carried out a 3-month preliminary investigation on the effectiveness of a rose hip shell powder and its mechanism of action. Of 52 patients suffering from acute exacerbations of low back pain (n = 39) or knee pain (n = 13), 29 had participated earlier in the pilot study with the pseudofruit powder Litozin®. After assessing the baseline values, patients were offered up to 20 g of a rose hip shell powder per day. Patients were encouraged to adjust the daily dose upwards or downwards according to their symptoms for the period of 3 months. The examination for possible effectiveness was by intention-to-treat analysis with last observation carried forward. There was no difference in any generic or disease-specific outcome variables between the patients consuming the rose hip shell powder and those consuming the pseudofruit powder Litozin® in the previous surveillance study. A human protein array system and fractions from the rose powders were used to study their effect on cytokine expression in vitro. The data indicate that lipophilic rose hip fractions from the shell and the pseudofruit inhibit cytokine expression and that the shell powder may be the better starting material for a future rose hip extract prepared with a lipophilic solvent. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Till to date, the advancement of medical science and technology is still unable to provide inclusive treatment to liver inflammation caused by neither microbial invasion nor antibiotics nor environmental toxins. Therefore, this article provides the basic knowledge of liver inflammation up to the cellular level and its current medical treatment for inflammatory symptom suppression. Because of the adverse effects of drug treatment, people start looking for comprehensive alternative nowadays. Herbal medicine is believed to be the best of choice because it is being practiced until now for centuries. Although numerous herbal plants have been reported for their efficacies in liver protection, Andrographis paniculata is the most widely used herb for hepatoprotection, particularly in Ayurveda and traditional Chinese medicine. This review covers the significant observation on the biochemical responses due to the experimental induction of liver damage in vitro and in vivo using the marker compound of the herb, namely andrographolide and its derivatives. The standardized extract of A. paniculata with the right phytochemical composition of diterpenic labdanes is likely to have tremendous potential for the development of hepatoprotective medicine. This standardized herbal medicine may not provide immediate remedy, but it can be considered as a comprehensive therapy for liver inflammation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Carum copticum L. has been used traditionally for its various therapeutic effects. The plant contains various components such as thymol and carvacrol. Different therapeutic effects such as antifungal, antioxidant, antibacterial, antiparasitic, and antilipidemic were described for the plant and its constituents. Therefore, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunological effects of C. copticum and its constituents, thymol and carvacrol, were discussed in the present review. Previous studies have shown potent antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunological effects for C. copticum and its constituents, thymol and carvacrol. Therefore, the plant and its constituents have therapeutic values in several inflammatory and immunological disorders as well as in the oxidative stress conditions. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In the course of this experiment on the anti-inflammatory effect of ginsenosides, protopanaxdiol ginsenosides have shown inhibition activities in inflammatory responses: NF-κB, COX-2, and iNOS were induced by TNF-α. The responses of this experiment were evaluated by NF-κB-luciferase assay and RT-PCR experiment of COX-2 and iNOS genes. The NF-κB expressions were inhibited by ginsenosides Rd, Rg5, Rz1, and Rk1 in a dose-dependent manner. The IC50 values were 3.47, 0.61, 0.63, and 0.75 μM, respectively. Particularly, ginsenosides Rg5, Rz1, and Rk1 as converted ginsenosides from primary protopanaxdiol ginsenosidess significantly inhibited COX-2 and iNOS gene expression. These inhibition levels were similar to sulfasalazine as reference material. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The keratinocyte-derived A431 Squamous Cell Carcinoma cells express the p53R273H mutant, which has been reported to inhibit apoptosis and autophagy. Here, we show that the crude extract of turmeric (Curcuma longa), similarly to its bioactive component Curcumin, could induce both apoptosis and autophagy in A431 cells, and these effects were concomitant with degradation of p53. Turmeric and curcumin also stimulated the activity of mTOR, which notoriously promotes cell growth and acts negatively on basal autophagy. Rapamycin-mediated inhibition of mTOR synergized with turmeric and curcumin in causing p53 degradation, increased the production of autophagosomes and exacerbated cell toxicity leading to cell necrosis. Small-interference mediated silencing of the autophagy proteins BECLIN 1 or ATG7 abrogated the induction of autophagy and largely rescued p53 stability in Turmeric-treated or Curcumin-treated cells, indicating that macroautophagy was mainly responsible for mutant p53 degradation. These data uncover a novel mechanism of turmeric and curcumin toxicity in chemoresistant cancer cells bearing mutant p53. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to assess the possible beneficial effects of curcumin capsules as lipid-lowering effects and as a permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of glyburide and as a P-gp substrate with glyburide in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus. Open-label, randomized control trial was carried out for 11 days on eight type-2 diabetic patients on glyburide therapy. On the first day of the study, following the administration of 5 mg of glyburide, blood samples were collected from the patients at various time intervals ranging from 0.5 to 24 h. Blood sampling was repeated on the 11th day of the study, after treating the patients with curcumin for ten consecutive days. Glyburide concentrations changed at the second hour, Cmax was unchanged, the glucose levels were decreased, Area Under first Movement Curre (AUMC) was increased, and no patient has experienced the hypoglycaemia. The low-density lipoprotein, very-low-density lipoprotein and triglycerides were decreased significantly, and the high-density lipoprotein content increased. The co-administration of curcumin capsules with glyburide may be beneficial to the patients in better glycaemic control. The lipid lowering and antidiabetic properties of the curcumin show as a potential future drug molecule. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Both aging and estrogen depletion lead to endothelial dysfunction, which is the main reason of many cardiovascular diseases. Previous reports have shown that cell protective effect of silymarin (SM) depends on its antioxidant and phytoestrogenic properties. We investigated the effect of SM on vascular stiffness of aged menopausal rats and the involvement of estrogenic activity in this effect. Isolated rat aortas were obtained from 22-month-old rats, after 18 months of ovariectomy (OVX) follow-up. Each ring was incubated in tissue bath either with SM (50 mg/L) and 17β-estradiol (10 μM, E2) or in the presence of SM/fulvestrant (50 mg/L, 10 μM). Endothelium-intact rings were precontracted with phenylephrine (0.001-30 μM) or high potassium (40 mM); endothelium-dependent/independent relaxant responses were obtained using acetylcholine (0.001-30 μM) and sodium nitroprusside (0.0001-3 μM), respectively. While phenylephrine sensitivity was significantly increased in OVX rats, relaxations were significantly less in aged OVX rats compared with young rats. In spite of the presence of estrogen antagonist, immediate SM treatment restored the endothelial function and vascular tone better than estrogen replacement. Additionally, as a complementary and alternative medicine, it does not cause estrogenic side effects when taken acutely. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 06/2014; 28(6):868-872.
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to assess the effects of a Mangifera indica stem bark extract (MSBE) and mangiferin (MG) on pain-related acute behaviors in the formalin 5% test. Rats received repeated oral MSBE (125–500 mg/kg) once daily for 7 days before formalin injection. Other four groups with the same treatments were performed in order to study the effect of MSBE on the formalin-induced long-term secondary mechano-hyperalgesia at 7 days after the injury by means of the pin-prick method. Additional groups received a single oral MSBE dose (250 mg/kg) plus ascorbic acid (1 mg/kg, i.p.). Also, repeated oral MG doses (12.5–50 mg/kg) during 7 days were administered. MSBE decreased licking/biting and flinching behaviors only in phase II and reduced the long-term formalin injury-induced secondary chronic mechano-hyperalgesia. The combination of MSBE plus ascorbic acid produced a reinforcement of this effect for flinching behavior, advising that antioxidant mechanisms are involved, at least in part, in these actions. Chronic administration of MG reproduced the effects of MSBE. For the first time, the antihyperalgesic effects of MSBE and MG in formalin 5% test, a recommended concentration for studying the antinociceptive activity of nitric oxide-related and N-methyl-D-aspartate-related compounds, were reported. These results could represent an important contribution to explain the analgesic ethnobotanical effects recognized to M. indica and other species containing MG.
    Phytotherapy Research 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Galangin, the main active component of Alpinia officinarum Hance, was tested in a mouse model of vitiligo induced in C57BL/6 mice by the topical application of 2 mL of 2.5% hydroquinone daily to shaved areas (2 × 2 cm) of dorsal skin for 60 days. Thirty days after the final application of hydroquinone, galangin (0.425, and 4.25 mg/kg) was administered orally for 30 days. The hair colour darkened when it grew back after treatment, and histological analysis showed that the number of melanin-containing hair follicles had increased after treatment with all doses of galangin groups and 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP, the positive control) compared with the untreated vitiligo group (p < 0.05). The number of skin basal layer melanocytes and melanin-containing epidermal cells had also increased significantly with the application of 4.25 mg/kg of galangin. The concentration of tyrosinase (TYR) in serum was found to have increased, whereas the content of malondialdehyde and the activity of cholinesterase had decreased after treatment with all doses of galangin and 8-MOP, compared with control (p < 0.05). The expression of TYR protein in treated areas of skin also increased with the application of 4.25 mg/kg galangin and 8-MOP. In conclusion, the results showed that galangin was able to improve vitiligo induced by hydroquinone in mice, with the activity related to concentrations of TYR, expression of TYR protein, activity of malondialdehyde and content of cholinesterase. Galangin may therefore be a potential candidate for the treatment of vitiligo, subject to further investigation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Our study aims to ascertain the antiinflammatory activity of Veronicastrum axillare and characterize the bioactive constituents. Antiinflammatory activity of the total extract and different fractions from V. axillare was investigated by employing the xylene-induced mouse ear edema model. As a result, the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction showed the highest antiinflammatory activity in vivo. From the EtOAc fraction and the inactive dichloromethane fraction, a total of five new compounds, axillasides A-C and axillactones A and B, together with four known compounds, procumboside A, buergeriside C1 , indole-3-carboxylic acid and apigenin, were isolated and identified. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and by comparison of their nuclear magnetic resonance data with those reported in the literature. Procumboside A, a major constituent in EtOAc fraction, showed significant antiinflammatory activity in vivo. Further studies revealed that procumboside A was a potent COX-2 inhibitor, significantly reducing the COX-2 protein level in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The CE marking is a statutory marking for certain products sold within the European Economic Area. Medicinal products with a CE label are not regulated by the European Medicines Agency but are licensed according to the directives of the European Community. We have analysed the proanthocyanin (PAC) content of four cranberry CE products by both a photometric (DMAC method using 4-dimethylamino-cinnamic-aldehyde as colouring reagent) and a high-performance liquid chromatography assay and have compared the daily dosages recommended for the products by their manufacturers with benchmark doses obtained from the literature. For all CE products, the identified DMAC values for the PAC content per unit were below those declared. For two of the CE medicinal products, not even the manufacturers' maximum daily dosages have type A PAC contents that would have any chance of providing the health benefits promised on the product information sheets; the other two might have some chance, but only at maximum dosage (nine capsules per day for one of them). CE medicinal products should be better controlled by regulatory authorities to prevent consumers from buying and taking doses that are inadequate to provide the benefits claimed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are considered potent molecules capable of promoting neuronal cell death and participating in the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies have shown that AGEs exacerbate β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation and AGE-related cross-links are also detected in senile plaques. Acrolein (ACR) is an α, β-unsaturated aldehyde found in the environment and thermally processed foods, which can additionally be generated through endogenous metabolism. The role of ACR in AD is widely accepted in the literature. Guarana (Paullinia cupana Mart.) is popularly consumed by the population in Brazil, mainly for its stimulant activity. In the present study, we showed that guarana (10, 100, and 1000 µg/mL) is able to prevent protein glycation, β-amyloid aggregation, in vitro methylglyoxal, glyoxal, and ACR (20 μM)-induced toxicity on neuronal-like cells (SH-SY5Y). Since these are considered typical AD pathological hallmarks, we propose that guarana may deserve further research as a potential therapeutic agent in such a neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Many studies have shown that a large number of terpenoids and aromatic compounds contained in essential oils have significant anticancer activities, both on cell lines and on tumors in animals. The activity of these constituents is related to the activation of cell death (apoptosis) induced by the caspases proteins in cancer cells, with minor modifications of healthy cells. Many phenomena seem to occur, among which are as follows: overexpression and regulation of liver detoxification enzymes, changes in the membrane potential of cancer cells and mitochondria, production of free radicals in cancer cells, inhibition of angiogenesis, and modification of tumor-inducing genes. These active essential oil constituents appear to act synergistically with conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and some clinical studies in humans are beginning to be realized. In this review, we discuss about the antitumoral activity of 13 essential oil components selected among the most studied in the literature, with a focus on their possible mode of action. We also report current data on the anticancer properties of several total essential oils. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the antidepressant-like effects of clary sage oil on human beings by comparing the neurotransmitter level change in plasma. The voluntary participants were 22 menopausal women in 50's. Subjects were classified into normal and depression tendency groups using each of Korean version of Beck Depression Inventory-I (KBDI-I), KBDI-II, and Korean version of Self-rating Depression Scale. Then, the changes in neurotransmitter concentrations were compared between two groups. After inhalation of clary sage oil, cortisol levels were significantly decreased while 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) concentration was significantly increased. Thyroid stimulating hormone was also reduced in all groups but not statistically significantly. The different change rate of 5-HT concentration between normal and depression tendency groups was variable according to the depression measurement inventory. When using KBDI-I and KBDI-II, 5-HT increased by 341% and 828% for the normal group and 484% and 257% for the depression tendency group, respectively. The change rate of cortisol was greater in depression tendency groups compared with normal groups, and this difference was statistically significant when using KBDI-II (31% vs. 16% reduction) and Self-rating Depression Scale inventory (36% vs. 8.3% reduction). Among three inventories, only KBDI-II differentiated normal and depression tendency groups with significantly different cortisol level. Finally, clary sage oil has antidepressant-like effect, and KBDI-II inventory may be the most sensitive and valid tool in screening for depression status or severity. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Bisphenol A (BPA), as a known endocrine disrupter, is closely related to the development of breast cancer. Curcumin has been clinically used in chemopreventation and treatment of cancer; however, it remains unknown whether microRNAs are involved in curcumin-mediated protection from BPA-associated promotive effects on breast cancer. In the present study, we showed that BPA exhibited estrogenic activity by increasing the proliferation of estrogen-receptor-positive MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and triggering transition of the cells from G1 to S phase. Curcumin inhibited the proliferative effects of BPA on MCF-7 cells. Meanwhile, BPA-induced upregulation of oncogenic miR-19a and miR-19b, and the dysregulated expression of miR-19-related downstream proteins, including PTEN, p-AKT, p-MDM2, p53, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, were reversed by curcumin. Furthermore, the important role of miR-19 in BPA-mediated MCF-7 cell proliferation was also illustrated. These results suggest for the first time that curcumin modulates miR-19/PTEN/AKT/p53 axis to exhibit its protective effects against BPA-associated breast cancer promotion. Findings from this study could provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which BPA exerts its breast-cancer-promoting effect as well as its target intervention. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In this work, the anti-Helicobacter pylori effect of an aqueous extract from dried leaves of Peumus boldus Mol. (Monimiaceae) was evaluated. This extract displayed high inhibitory activity against H. pylori urease. Therefore, in order to clarify the type of substances responsible for such effect, a bioassay-guided fractionation strategy was carried out. The active compounds in the fractions were characterized through different chromatographic methods (RP-HPLC; HILIC-HPLC). The fraction named F5 (mDP = 7.8) from aqueous extract was the most active against H. pylori urease with an IC50 = 15.9 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL. HPLC analysis evidenced that F5 was composed mainly by catechin-derived proanthocyanidins (LC-MS and phloroglucinolysis). The anti-adherent effect of boldo was assessed by co-culture of H. pylori and AGS cells. Both the aqueous extract and F5 showed an anti-adherent effect in a concentration-dependent manner. An 89.3% of inhibition was reached at 2.0 mg GAE/mL of boldo extract. In conjunction, our results suggest that boldo extract has a potent anti-urease activity and anti-adherent effect against H. pylori, properties directly linked with the presence of catechin-derived proanthocyanidins. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Medicinal plants are increasingly of interest as novel source of drugs for antiherpetic agents, because herpes simplex virus (HSV) might develop resistance to commonly used antiviral drugs. An aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis and the phenolic compounds caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and rosmarinic acid were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) acyclovir-sensitive and clinical isolates of acyclovir-resistant strains in vitro. When drugs were added during the intracellular replication of HSV-1 infected cells, no antiviral effect was observed by plaque reduction assay. However, Melissa extract interacted directly with free viral particles of two acyclovir-resistant HSV strains at low IC50 values of 0.13 and 0.23 µg/mL and high selectivity indices of 2692 and 1522, respectively. The Melissa extract and rosmarinic acid inhibited HSV-1 attachment to host cells in a dose-dependent manner for acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant strains. These results indicate that mainly rosmarinic acid contributed to the antiviral activity of Melissa extract. Penetration of herpes viruses into cells was inhibited by Melissa extract at 80% and 96% for drug-sensitive and drug-resistant viruses, respectively. Melissa extract exhibits low toxicity and affects attachment and penetration of acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant HSVs in vitro. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Phytotherapy Research 05/2014;

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