Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry (J Polymer Sci Polymer Chem )

Publisher: John Wiley and Sons

Description

The Journal of Polymer Science reports results of fundamental research in all areas of synthetic and natural polymer chemistry and physics. The Journal is selective in accepting contributions on the basis of merit and originality. It is not intended as a repository for unevaluated data. Preference is given to contributions that offer new or more comprehensive concepts interpretations experimental approaches and results. Part A: Polymer Chemistry is devoted to studies in general organic polymer chemistry and physical organic chemistry. This includes all related topics (such as organic bioorganic bioinorganic and biological chemistry of monomers polymers oligomers and model compounds inorganic and organometallic chemistry for catalysts mechanistic studies supramolecular chemistry aspects relevant to polymers and reactions on polymers). Contributions in physics and physical chemistry appear in Part B: Polymer Physics . Contributions may be submitted as Regular Articles or as Rapid Communications. Reviews of recent books are also welcome.

Impact factor 3.54

  • 5-year impact
    3.22
  • Cited half-life
    6.70
  • Immediacy index
    0.76
  • Eigenfactor
    0.04
  • Article influence
    0.66
  • Website
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A: Polymer Chemistry website
  • Other titles
    Journal of polymer science. Part A, Polymer chemistry (Online), Journal of polymer science. Part A, Polymer chemistry, Polymer chemistry
  • ISSN
    1099-0518
  • OCLC
    39029246
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

John Wiley and Sons

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • On personal web site or secure external website at authors institution
    • Deposit in institutional repositories is not allowed
    • JASIST authors may deposit in an institutional repository
    • Non-commercial
    • Pre-print must be accompanied with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'John Wiley and Sons' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Novel linear–dendritic super-H block copolymers are prepared by multistage synthetic process involving “living” polymerizations.
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 01/2015; 53(2):178.
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    ABSTRACT: For a long time ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) copolymers with high comonomer contents were believed to be amorphous materials with a random copolymer composition. This is not completely correct as has been shown by temperature rising elution fractionation (TREF) combined with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), crystallization analysis fractionation (CRYSTAF), and high temperature–high-performance liquid chromatography (HT-HPLC). When using only conventional crystallization-based fractionation methods, the comprehensive compositional analysis of EPR copolymers was impossible due to the fact that large fractions of these copolymers do not crystallize under CRYSTAF conditions. In the present work, HT-HPLC was used for the separation of the EPR copolymers according to their ethylene and propylene distributions along the polymer chains. These investigations showed the existence of long ethylene sequences in the bulk samples which was further confirmed by DSC. The results on the bulk samples prompted us to conduct preparative fractionations of EPR copolymers having varying ethylene contents using TREF. Surprisingly, significant amounts of crystallizing materials were obtained that were analyzed using a multistep protocol. CRYSTAF and DSC analyses of the TREF fractions revealed the presence of components with large crystallizable sequences that had not been detected by the bulk samples analyses. HT-HPLC provided a comprehensive separation and characterization of both the amorphous and the crystalline TREF fractions. The TREF fractions eluting at higher temperatures showed the presence of ethylene-rich copolymers and PE homopolymer. In order to obtain additional structural information on the separated fractions, HT-HPLC was coupled to Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The FT-IR data confirmed that the TREF fractions were separated according to the ethylene contents of the eluted samples. Preparative TREF analysis together with a combination of various analytical methods proved to be useful tools in understanding the complex molecular composition of these rubber samples. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2015
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 01/2015;
  • Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Synthesis, characterization, and polymer solar cell and transistor application of a series of phenanthro[1,2-b:8,7-b′]dithiophene-based donor–acceptor (D–A)-type semiconducting polymers combined with a diketopyrrolopyrrole unit are reported. The present polymers showed some unique features such as strong aggregation behavior, high thermal stability, and short π–π stacking distance (3.5–3.6 Å), which are suitable for high performance organic materials. In addition, they have a significantly extended absorption up to 1000 nm with a band gap of ca. 1.2 eV. However, such strong intermolecular interaction reduced their solubility and molecular weights, which resulted in low crystalline nature and moderate field-effect mobility of 0.01 cm2 V−1 s−1. Furthermore, such strong aggregation behavior led to the large-scale phase separation in the blend films, which may prevent the effective photocurrent generation, limiting Jsc and power conversion efficiency of 2.0%. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2015
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: The successful synthesis is described for a donor–acceptor rod–coil block copolymer comprising blocks of poly[2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene)-alt-bithiophene] (F6T2) and polystyrene functionalized with fullerene (PS(C60)) (F6T2-b-PS(C60)). This new material was obtained by combining Suzuki polycondensation with radical addition fragmentation chain transfer. The block copolymer was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, gel permeation chromatography, and optical spectroscopy methods. Photophysical data for (F6T2-b-PS(C60)) and a related block copolymer (F6T2-b-PS(PCBM)) (PCBM, phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester) are reported and their performance as compatibilizers in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells is assessed. It is demonstrated that the addition of the rod–coil block copolymers to the active layer extends the operational stability of organic photovoltaic devices. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2015
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: A derivative of poly(p-phenylene ethynylene) was subjected to the palladium-catalyzed three-component coupling reactions with aryl halides and phenylboronic acid to obtain polymers having tetrasubstituted cis-vinylene units. For example, 69% of the acetylene units in the prepolymer were converted to cis-vinylene (i.e., tetrasubstituted cis-vinylene) units using iodobenzene and phenylboronic acid (5 equiv each with respect to acetylene units). In the UV–vis absorption spectra of the resulting polymers, clear hypsochromic shifts of the absorption maxima were observed, while bathochromic shifts and suppression of the efficiency were observed in their photoluminescence spectra. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2015
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Four polythiophene derivatives including regiorandom polymers P1, P2, and P3 and a regioregular polymer P4, containing a phenyl side chain with electron-withdrawing carbonyl groups such as an ester and a ketone at the 3-position of the thiophene ring, were synthesized by Stille coupling reaction. Bulk-heterojunction polymer solar cells (PSCs) based on these polymers as p-type semiconductors and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) were fabricated, and their photovoltaic performances were evaluated for the first time. The PSC devices based on the regioregular polymer P4:PCBM = 1:2 (w/w) exhibited a high-open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.943 V because of the low-lying highest occupied molecular orbit energy level of P4. The short π–π stacking distance (0.355 nm) in the parallel direction to the substrate and “face-on” rich orientation were observed by the grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering experiment, which might reflect higher Jsc and FF values of the P4:[6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) PSC device than others. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2015
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Poly(N-phenylitaconimide) (polyPhII) was prepared using initiators for continuous activator regeneration atom transfer radical polymerization of PhII using FeBr3 complexes as catalysts. Conversion reached 69% in 24 h, yielding polyPhII with a number average molecular weight Mn = 11,900 and a molecular weight distribution Mw/Mn = 1.52. Copolymerizations of PhII with styrene at various molar ratios were performed providing a range of polyPhII-copolySt polymers. When the copolymerization was carried out with higher [St]0 > [PhII]0 ratio, a one-pot synthesis of poly(St-alt-PhII)-b-polySt was achieved. The thermal properties of the obtained copolymers were studied by differential scanning calorimetry. PolyPhII prepared by ATRP showed high glass transition temperature (Tg) of 216 °C and the poly(St-alt-PhII)-b-polySt exhibited two Tgs, at 162 and 104 °C, corresponding to a poly(St-alt-PhII) and polySt segments, respectively. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Novel xanthate RAFT agents, RAFT1-5, designed for the preparation of a range of novel N-vinyl pyrrolidone-based polymeric materials with linear and star architectures via RAFT polymerization are reported. Ethyl pyrrolidone moiety was included in the structures of the xanthates as a part of R (RAFT1-3) or Z group (RAFT4) to evaluate their effect on the polymerization and to impart homogeneity in the resulting products. The xanthates were designed to fragment to give primary (RAFT1), secondary (RAFT2 and 4), and tertiary radicals (RAFT 3) allowing evaluation of their effect on polymerization. RAFT5 was designed to produce polymeric materials with four-arm architectures. RAFT1 showed comparable characteristics as conventional radical polymerization. RAFT2 and RAFT4 exhibited living/controlled polymerizations, owing to the combination of stable secondary radical species and incorporation of ethyl pyrrolidone moiety as the R and Z group, respectively. RAFT2 and RAFT5 gave first examples of random copolymers of NVP and VAc with linear and four-arm star architectures, all exhibiting monomodal distributions and narrow dispersity. The four-arm PVAc star was used as a macroCTA to synthesize amphiphilic four-arm star PVAc-block-PNVP. The TEM investigation showed the formation of spherical micelles with an average diameter of about 60 nm. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Naphthalimide-phthalimide derivatives (NDPDs) have been synthesized and combined with an iodonium salt, N-vinylcarbazole, amine or 2,4,6-tris(trichloromethyl)-1,3,5-triazine to produce reactive species (i.e., radicals and cations). These generated reactive species are capable of initiating the cationic polymerization of epoxides and/or the radical polymerization of acrylates upon exposure to very soft polychromatic visible lights or blue lights. Compared with the well-known camphorquinone based systems used as references, the novel NDPD based combinations employed here demonstrate clearly higher efficiencies for the cationic polymerization of epoxides under air as well as the radical polymerization of acrylates. Remarkably, one of the NDPDs (i.e., NDPD2) based systems is characterized by an outstanding reactivity. The structure/reactivity/efficiency relationships of the investigated NDPDs were studied by fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry, laser flash photolysis, electron spin resonance spin trapping, and steady state photolysis techniques. The key parameters for their reactivity are provided. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: DFT computations have been performed to investigate the mechanism of H2-assisted chain transfer strategy to functionalize polypropylene via Zr-catalyzed copolymerization of propylene and p-methylstyrene (pMS). The study unveils the following: (i) propylene prefers 1,2-insertion over 2,1-insertion both kinetically and thermodynamically, explaining the observed 1,2-insertion regioselectivity for propylene insertion. (ii) The 2,1-inserion of pMS is kinetically less favorable but thermodynamically more favorable than 1,2-insertion. The observation of 2,1-insertion pMS at the end of polymer chain is due to thermodynamic control and that the barrier difference between the two insertion modes become smaller as the chain length becomes longer. (iii) The pMS insertion results in much higher barriers for subsequent either propylene or pMS insertion, which causes deactivation of the catalytic system. (iv) Small H2 can react with the deactivated [Zr]−pMS−PPn facilely, which displace functionalized pMS−PPn chain and regenerate [Zr]H active catalyst to continue copolymerization. The effects of counterions are also discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 12/2014;
  • Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Core-shell structured barium titanate-poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (BaTiO3-PGMA) nanocomposites were prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of GMA from the surface of BaTiO3 nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the grafting of the PGMA shell on the surface of the BaTiO3 nanoparticles cores. Transmission Electron Microscopy results revealed that BaTiO3 nanoparticles are covered by thin brushes (∼20 nm) of PGMA forming a core-shell structure and thermogravimetric analysis results showed that the grafted BaTiO3-PGMA nanoparticles consist of ∼13.7% PGMA by weight. Upon incorporating these grafted nanoparticles into 20 μm-thick films, the resultant BaTiO3-PGMA nanocomposites have shown an improved dielectric constant (ε = 54), a high breakdown field strength (∼3 MV/cm) and high-energy storage density ∼21.51 J/cm3. AC conductivity measurements were in good agreement with Jonscher's universal power law and low leakage current behavior was observed before the electrical breakdown field of the films. Improved dielectric and electrical properties of core-shell structured BaTiO3-PGMA nanocomposite were attributed to good nanoparticle dispersion and enhanced interfacial polarization. Furthermore, only the surface grafted BaTiO3 yielded homogenous films that were mechanically stable. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The ability of certain alkyl substituted epoxides to accelerate the photoinitiated cationic ring-opening polymerizations of oxetane monomers by substantially reducing or eliminating the induction period altogether has been termed by us “kick-starting.” In this communication, the rates of photopolymerization of several model “kick-started” oxetane systems were quantified and compared with the analogous biscycloaliphatic epoxide monomer, 3,4-epoxycyclohexylmethyl 3′,4′-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ERL). It has been found that the “kick-started” systems undergo photopolymerization at rates that are at least two-fold faster than ERL. These results suggest that “kick-started” oxetanes could replace ERL in many applications in which high speed ultraviolet induced crosslinking photopolymerizations are carried out. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Clay/poly(glycidyl methacrylate) nanocomposites (clay/PGMA) were prepared by in situ radical photopolymerization using N,N-dimethylaminopropyltrimethoxysilane(DMA)-modified bentonite clay acting as hydrogen donor for benzophenone in solution. This initiating system permits to photopolymerize glycidyl methacrylate between the lamellae of the DMA-modified clay. The approach provides exfoliated nanocomposites as judged by the measurements of X-ray diffraction. However, a low fraction of persistent intercalated clay regions was visible by transmission electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectra analyses indicate that the nanocomposites have PGMA-rich surface. The clay/PGMA nanocomposites can be readily dispersed in ethanol. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Cationic ring-opening polymerization of trimethylene carbonate using o-benzenedisulfonimide as a reusable catalyst under mild conditions was described. The polymerization proceeded homogeneously without decarboxylation and poly(trimethylene carbonates) (PTMCs) were synthesized with well-controlled molecular weights and narrow polydispersities (Mw/Mn = 1.12–1.18). The spectra of 1H-NMR, SEC, and MALDI–ToF MS clearly demonstrated the incorporation of the initiator residue into the polymer chains and the controlled/living nature of the polymerizations. Furthermore, the catalyst can be easily recovered, and its efficiency was fully retained. In addition, 1,3-propanediol, 1,1,1-trimethylolpropane, and pentaerythritol were successfully used as initiators to produce telechelic and star-shaped polycarbonates which were determined by intrinsic viscosity experiments. The number of arms estimated by the shrinking factors ( ) were 2.0, 2.6, and 3.5, respectively, indicating the successful syntheses of the two-, three-, and four-armed PTMCs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2014.
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Isoquinolinone derivatives (IQ) have been synthesized and combined with different additives (an amine, 2,4,6-tris(trichloromethyl)-1,3,5-triazine, an iodonium salt, or N-vinylcarbazole) to produce reactive species (i.e. radicals and cations) being able to initiate the radical polymerization of acrylates, the cationic polymerization of epoxides, the thiol-ene polymerization of trifunctional thiol/divinylether, and the synthesis of epoxide/acrylate interpenetrated polymer network IPN upon exposure to very soft polychromatic visible lights, blue laser diode or blue LED lights. Compared with the use of camphorquinone based systems, the novel combinations employed here ensures higher monomer conversions (∼50–60% vs. ∼15–35%) and better polymerization rates in radical polymerization. The chemical mechanisms are studied by steady-state photolysis, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry, laser flash photolysis, and electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Here, the synthesis of triblock terpolymers using tert-butyl acrylate, glycidyl methacrylate, and methyl methacrylate was studied in detail using atom transfer radical polymerization. Those polymers are promising candidates for irreversible linked microstructured layers on surfaces. The experiments showed that the polymerization has to be started with the acrylate and can be extended with the methacrylates. The first two steps can be done in a one pot procedure employing the method of halogen exchange. With optimized reaction conditions in the last step, the obtained terpolymers show narrow molecular weight distributions and the polymerization process is well controlled. Conducting the synthesis in the opposite direction mostly a nonuniform product was obtained as the GPC analysis showed. Further characterization was done with 1H NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry, the latter showing different glass points for the single blocks in the terpolymers if they are not too short. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2014.
    Journal of Polymer Science Part A Polymer Chemistry 12/2014;