Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics (J Polymer Sci B Polymer Phys )

Publisher: John Wiley and Sons

Description

The Journal of Polymer Science reports results of fundamental research in all areas of high polymer chemistry and physics. The Journal is selective in accepting contributions on the basis of merit and originality. It is not intended as a repository for unevaluated data. Preference is given to contributions that offer new or more comprehensive concepts interpretations experimental approaches and results. Part B: Polymer Physics accepts contributions in physics and physical chemistry. Contributions may be submitted as Regular Articles as Rapid Communications or as Notes. Regular articles are full length papers to be considered as complete publications of original unpublished results. Rapid Communications refer to mostly preliminary reports of extreme urgency significance and originality which should be limited to a maximum of 3 printed pages. Papers to be submitted for consideration as Notes should be short versions of Regular Articles.

  • Impact factor
    2.22
  • 5-year impact
    2.03
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.59
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.60
  • Website
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics website
  • Other titles
    Journal of polymer science. Part B, Polymer physics (Online), Journal of polymer science. Part B, Polymer physics, Polymer physics
  • ISSN
    1099-0488
  • OCLC
    39028915
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

John Wiley and Sons

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • On personal web site or secure external website at authors institution
    • Deposit in institutional repositories is not allowed
    • JASIST authors may deposit in an institutional repository
    • Non-commercial
    • Pre-print must be accompanied with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'John Wiley and Sons' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the gas separation membranes made with gelatin, crosslinked with ferulic acid (FA) and blended with polyethylene glycol (PEG) 200, by using a solvent-free procedure. Gas permeation properties (He, N2, O2, and CO2) of these “green membranes” were studied and discussed in relation with their structure. Differential scanning calorimetric measurements were carried out to determine the gelatin triple helical renaturation level. The lowest permeability values [He and CO2 permeability (4.5 × 10−2 Barrer) with CO2/O2 selectivity of 14.5] were reached with gelatin/PEG 200 uncrosslinked membranes showing the highest renaturation level (40%). Crosslinking with FA lead to less rigid and brittle materials than GTA and to 10 times more permeable membranes compared with uncrosslinked membranes. Membranes crosslinked with glutaraldehyde broke during gas permeation measurements. Results demonstrated that higher gas permeability values were closely related to lower renaturation level of gelatin. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs) were prepared by reactions of 2,4-tolylene diisocyanate (TDI) and hydroxy-terminated 4-arm star-shaped l-lactide oligomers (H4LAOn's) with the degrees of polymerization of lactate unit per one arm, n = 3, 5, and 10 in the presence of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL). Morphologies, thermal, and mechanical properties of the TDI-bridged H4LAOn (TH4LAOn)/PCL semi-IPNs were evaluated by comparing with those of poly(l-lactide) (PLA)/PCL blends. Compatibility between the two components of the TH4LAOn/PCL semi-IPN with a PCL content not more than 50 wt % was much better than those of the PLA/PCL blends with the same PCL content. All the TH4LAOn networks were substantially amorphous and their tan δ peak or glass transition temperatures increased with decreasing n value. Most of the semi-IPNs did not show clear glass transition temperature related to both the components. Tensile toughness and elongation at break for all the TH4LAOn/PCL semi-IPNs were much higher than those for the PLA/PCL blends with the same PCL content. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 11/2014; 52(21):1420-1428.
  • Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Semiconductor organic-inorganic nanocomposites have garnered much attention as they integrate the advantageous properties from conjugated polymers (CPs) and semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs). Recent developments in interfacial engineering of CP-NC nanocomposites enabled the intimate contact between CPs and NCs, thereby facilitating charge separation between these two constituents. To capitalize on the use of CP-NC nanocomposites for hybrid solar cells, several issues need to be addressed, including materials design and engineering, light harvesting, and morphology of photoactive layer. In this Review, the general working principle of hybrid solar cells and the development of p-type and n-type CPs are briefly introduced, followed by the highlight of recent advances in synthesis of CP-NC nanocomposites in which CP and NC are in intimate contact for hybrid solar cells, and the discussion on various strategies for potentially improved power conversion efficiency. An outlook for future directions in this area is also presented. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Climbing lizards display numerous advanced features in their locomotion, notably a method to quickly switch between a state of low and high adhesive force capacity. Inspired by the gecko's adhesive switching, a method of mechanically switching between low and high adhesive states is reported. In particular, the first switching of an adhesive system using only a change in system compliance is demonstrated. Mechanical clamping and a novel magnetic clamping system are used to switch an iron/PDMS composite adhesive between a soft and rigid state. The switch in compliance directly influences the maximum load of the adhesive as measured in lap-shear. Notably, contact area and the contact chemistry remain unaltered despite significant changes in force capacity. The demonstration of a compliance-only switching mechanism has broad implications for understanding natural adhesive systems—especially in organisms that can dynamically alter their rigidity (e.g. cells). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We present a study of isotropic and uniaxially oriented binary blend films comprising ≤1 wt % of the conjugated polymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) dispersed in both ultra-high molecular weight (UHMW) and linear-low-density (LLD) polyethylene (PE). Polarized absorption, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction are used to characterize the samples before and after tensile deformation. Results show that blend films can be prepared with PFO chains adopting a combination of several distinct molecular conformations, namely glassy, crystalline, and the so-called β-phase, which directly influences the resulting optical properties. Both PFO concentration and drawing temperature strongly affect the alignment of PFO chains during the tensile drawing of the blend films. In both PE hosts, crystallization of PFO takes place during drawing; the resulting ordered chains show optimal optical anisotropy. Our results clarify the PFO microstructure in oriented blends with PE and the processing conditions required for achieving the maximal optical anisotropy. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Poly(1,5-diaminoanthraquinone) is synthesized by oxidative polymerization of diaminoanthraquinone monomers and investigated as an organic host for Li-storage reaction. Benefiting from its high density of redox-active, Li+-associable benzoquinone groups attached to conducting polyaniline backbones, this polymer undergoes its cathodic reaction predominately through Li+-insertion/extraction processes, delivering a very high reversible capacity of 285 mAh g−1. In addition, the PDAQ polymer cathode exhibits an excellent rate capability (125 mAh g−1 at 800 mA g−1) and a considerable cyclability with a capacity retention of ∼160 mAh g−1 over 200 cycles, possibly serving as a sustainable, high capacity Li+ host cathode for Li-ion batteries. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Blends of self-assembling polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinyl pyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) diblock-copolymers and poly(4-vinyl pyridine) (P4VP) homopolymers were used to fabricate isoporous and nanoporous films. Block copolymers (BCP) self-assembled into a structure where the minority component forms very uniform cylinders, while homopolymers, resided in the core of the cylinders. Selective removal of the homopolymers by ethanol immersion led to the formation of well-ordered pores. In films without added homopolymer, just immersion in ethanol and subsequent swelling of the P4VP blocks was found to be sufficient to create pores. Pore sizes were tuned between 10 and 50 nm by simply varying the homopolymer content and the molecular weight of the block-copolymer. Uniformity was lost when the average pore size exceeded 30 nm because of macrophase separation. However, preparation of films from low MW diblock copolymers showed that it is possible to have excellent pore size control and a high porosity, while retaining a low pore size distribution. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Systematically varied annealing, encapsulation, and solvent vapor treatments are conducted to produce stable OPV devices with controlled film morphology and high performance when produced in air. Active layer films are analyzed by AFM, nanomechanical mapping, UV–vis spectroscopy, and XRD. Devices prepared with isopropanol solvent vapor annealing (SVA) combined with thermal annealing (TA) show the highest environmental resistance and performance. Such devices yield average PCE of 3.3%, with stability to atmospheric exposure of up to 60 min prior to encapsulation. Encapsulated devices exposed to the laboratory environment for 30 days exhibit a decrease in PCE of ∼15%. On application of a second TA step PCE is recovered to over 90% of the original value. The unprecedented air stability of the cells is attributed to the formation of an active layer with a stable, favorable morphology during the SVA process, which is associated with lower oxygen content films. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Star copolymers have attracted significant interest due to their different characteristics compared with diblock copolymers, including higher critical micelle concentration, lower viscosity, unique spatial shape, or morphologies. Development of synthetic skills such as anionic polymerization and controlled radical polymerization have made it possible to make diverse architectures of polymers. Depending on the molecular architecture of the copolymer, numerous morphologies are possible, for instance, Archimedean tiling patterns and cylindrical microdomains at symmetric volume fraction for miktoarm star copolymers as well as asymmetric lamellar microdomains for star-shaped copolymers, which have not been reported for linear block copolymers. In this review, we focus on morphologies and microphase separations of miktoarm (AmBn and ABC miktoarm) star copolymers and star-shaped [(A-b-B)n] copolymers with nonlinear architecture. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: New multifunctional polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-ZnO/Ag composite electrospun nanofiber membranes consisting of pineal-type, flower-type, and sea-urchin-type ZnO morphologies were prepared using a single-capillary electrospinning technique, hydrothermal ZnO synthesis, and Ag reduction. The various ZnO architectures exhibited differences in photocatalytic activity and UV-shielding efficiency, and were ranked as follows: sea-urchin type > flower type > pineal type. Sea-urchin-type ZnO features a higher surface-to-volume ratio than other ZnO architectures do because of its distinctive structure, thus yielding higher performance. The present study demonstrated that self-standing PAN-ZnO/Ag composite fiber membranes, especially those with the sea-urchin-type ZnO structure, can be applied in multifunctional textiles such as water purification filters and antibacterial and UV-shielding clothes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Temperature dependences of spherulite morphology and crystal orientation of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) were systematically investigated via a combinatorial method. The method created a temperature gradient ranging from 130 to 200 °C. Results show that the preferential orientation of the crystallites changes with the crystallization temperature. The crystallization at 169 °C gives the most highly developed crystalline state of PVDF crystalline form II (α form), in which the spherulite size is maximal, and the crystallite sizes are also the longest, about 200 nm along the b axes. Besides, the a-axis is almost parallel to the film normal. It indicates that the crystallization rate is the highest in the b-axis direction. The perferential orientation at higher temperatures may be attributed to the confined 2D growth of the PVDF spherulites in the thin film, whereas the spherulites grow in the 3D mode at lower temperatures. The crystallization behavior revealed in the method is consistent with the results of melt isothermal crystallization experiments. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Polymeric gas separation membranes frequently undergo the phenomenon of aging, that is, performance parameters like permeability decrease with storage or usage time. Here, we report on a new approach of reducing aging by incorporation of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes into a polymer of intrinsic microporosity. Free volume and permeability measurements clearly show a reduced aging with incorporation of the carbon nantubes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The isothermal crystallization of poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) in blends with poly(butylene oxalate) (PBOX) is investigated by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, and optical microscopy. We focus on the temperatures at which only PLLA crystallizes while PBOX is amorphous. It is obtained that the addition of PBOX causes a reduction of the melting temperature of PLLA. The lamellar thickness of PLLA crystals decreases whereas the amorphous layer thickness increases with blend composition, suggesting the occurrence of the interlamellar incorporation upon the addition of PBOX. The crystal growth rate and morphology of PLLA/PBOX blends are analyzed by polarized optical microscopy. The spherulite growth rate of PLLA is found to increase with the addition of PBOX. Analysis of the isothermal crystallization in terms of the Lauritzen and Hoffman equation give the reduction of the fold surface free energy upon the addition of PBOX in PLLA, indicating that the mobility of the PLLA chains is significantly improved due to the presence of PBOX. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We have developed and applied a molecular theory that enables the investigation of the interactions between polyelectrolyte coated nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solutions. Potential applications of polyelectrolyte-coated NPs involve nanosensors for oil well characterization. To account for the high salinity environment encountered in an oil well or brine solution, we also considered in the theoretical description counterion condensation as well as ion–ion paring. We identified the design criteria to achieve dispersion stability of NPs coated with either polyacrylic acid (pAA), poly acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonate (pAMPS), or an alternating copolymer of acrylic acid and acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonate (pAA-a-AMPS) under brine-like conditions and quantified the effects of NP core size, molecular weight, density of the polyelectrolyte coating, and polymer chemistry. The results were summarized in stability diagrams, which predict the polymer surface coverage and molecular weight that is required for the NP solution to remain dispersed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Graft copolymers formed by anchoring poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains to conjugated polythiophene have been prepared by copolymerizing two compounds: unsubstituted α-terthiophene (Th3) and a thiophene-derived macromonomer having an α-terthiophene conjugated sequence and one Th3 bearing a PEG chain with molecular weight of 2000 as substitute at the 3-position of the central heterocycle (Th3-PEG2000). The grafting ratio of the resulting copolymers (PTh3*-g-PEG), which were obtained using 75:25 and 50:50 Th3-PEG2000:Th3 weight ratios, is significantly smaller than that of copolymers derived from polymerization of macromonomers consisting of a α-pentathiophene sequence in which the central ring bears a PEG chain of Mw = 2000 (PTh5-g-PEG). The electroactivity and electrochemical stability of PTh3*-g-PEG is not only higher than that of PTh5-g-PEG but also higher than that of PTh3, the latter presenting a very compact structure that makes difficult the access and escape of dopant ions into the polymeric matrix during the redox processes. Furthermore, the optical π-π* lowest transition energy of PTh3*-g-PEG is lower than that of both PTh5-g-PEG and PTh3. These properties, combined with suitable wettability and roughness, result in an excellent behavior as bioactive platform of PTh3*-g-PEG copolymers, which are more biocompatible, in terms of cellular adhesion and proliferation, and electro-compatible than PTh5-g-PEG. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Janus hairy nanoparticles (JHNPs) represent a new class of hybrid materials with a nanoparticle core and a layer of bicompartmentalized polymer brushes. This unique structure combines the complex properties of polymer brushes, the amphiphilic nature of surfactant, and the mechanical, optical, and electronic properties of nanoparticles. Over the past decade, tremendous efforts have been devoted to synthesizing JHNPs and understanding their structure and properties. In this review, we will summarize the recent progresses in the field, including fabrication approaches and the self- and directed assembly behavior of such JHNPs. We will specifically focus on the newly developed polymer single crystal directed nanoparticle assembly approach. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with a size of about 2 nm are prepared in nanoreactors of spherical polyelectrolyte brushes (SPBs) consisting of a solid polystyrene (PS) core and a shell of linear poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) chains densely grafted onto the core by one end. The synthesized MNP are strongly adhered to PAA chains due to the intense interaction of chemical coordination with the carboxyl groups. The generation of MNP in SPB layer is legibly revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) due to the significant increase in electron density. The radial distribution of MNP in SPB is built by fitting SAXS data. Most of MNP are found to locate nearby the surface of PS core. Compared to dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy, SAXS can observe the generation and distribution of MNP in SPB as well as the changes upon changing pH and salt concentration in real time. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Centrifugal spinning, a recently developed approach for ultra-fine fiber production, has attracted much attention as compared with the electrospinning, due to its high yield, no solution polarity and high-voltage electrostatic field requirements, etc. In this study, the jet formation process and spinning parameters on jet path are explored and compared in nozzle- and nozzle-less centrifugal spinning systems. For nozzle-less centrifugal spinning, fingers are formed at the front of thin liquid film due to the theory of Rayleigh–Taylor instability. We find that the lower solution concentration and higher rotational speed favor the formation of thinner and longer fingers. Then, the critical angular velocity and initial jet velocity for nozzle-/nozzle-less centrifugal spinning are obtained in accordance with the balance of centrifugal force, viscous force, and surface tension. When jet leaves the spinneret, it will undergo a series of motions including necking and whipping processes, and then, a steady spiral jet path is formed with its radius getting tighter. Finally, we experimentally study the effect of rotational speed and solution concentration on jet path, which shows that the higher rotational speed results in a larger radius of jet path while the solution concentration has little effect on it. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2014
    Journal of Polymer Science Part B Polymer Physics 09/2014;