Zoo Biology (Zoo Biol )

Publisher: American Zoo and Aquarium Association, John Wiley and Sons

Description

Zoo Biology is concerned with reproduction demographics genetics behavior medicine husbandry nutrition conservation and all empirical aspects of the exhibition and maintenance of wild animals in wildlife parks zoos and aquariums. This diverse journal offers a forum for effectively communicating scientific findings original ideas and critical thinking related to the role of wildlife collections and their unique contribution to conservation.

  • Impact factor
    1.14
  • 5-year impact
    1.11
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.10
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.30
  • Website
    Zoo Biology website
  • Other titles
    Zoo biology (Online), Zoo biology
  • ISSN
    1098-2361
  • OCLC
    38866489
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

John Wiley and Sons

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • On personal web site or secure external website at authors institution
    • Deposit in institutional repositories is not allowed
    • JASIST authors may deposit in an institutional repository
    • Non-commercial
    • Pre-print must be accompanied with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set phrase (see individual journal copyright transfer agreements)
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'John Wiley and Sons' is an imprint of 'Wiley'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We conducted a temperature-dependent reproductive study on Yellow Stingrays (Urobatis jamaicensis) at the John G. Shedd Aquarium, Chicago, Illinois. A group of eight and six female rays were mated in 22°C ("cold") and 27°C ("warm") water, respectively, over a two-year period. Mating behavior, gestation length, pup yields, body condition indices, and activity levels were compared throughout both temperature trials. Mating behavior (e.g., pre-copulatory pursuits and behavior) did not differ between temperature trials. Cold trial gestation was incomplete and yielded no pups, while the warm trial resulted in three successful births and one stillborn birth. Body condition indices and overall activity were significantly decreased in the cold trials. These data suggest consequences for rearing Yellow Stingrays in cooler water and should aid in successful reproduction of U. jamaicensis at zoos and aquariums. Zoo Biol. 9999:1-7, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Zoo Biology 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Enrichment can improve animal physiological and psychological well-being. This study sought to promote more natural felid behavior and prevent development or incidence of stereotypies through the use of a feeding enrichment. Our objectives are to use fecal glucocorticoid metabolites values and behavioral observations to quantify the effectiveness of the enrichment device for two species of large cats, Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris; n = 2) and cougar (Felis concolor; n = 2). The feeding enrichment, a white-tailed deer carcass flank securely attached to an AussieDog Products(©) Felid 120-cm bungee, was implemented twice for each individual separated by 1 month. Fecal samples were obtained from each felid and analyzed for pre- and post-enrichment fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGM) concentrations using a cortisol enzyme immunoassay. An ethogram with 12 mutual exclusive behavioral categories was utilized to record behavioral responses to the enrichment. Results demonstrate that: 1) there were no differences (P > 0.05) in FGMs for either species between pre- and post-enrichment; 2) pacing decreased (P = 0.025) and walking increased (P = 0.017) after exposure to enrichment in both cougars; and 3) tigers reduced (P = 0.025) 'other' behavioral category after the first enrichment exposure and laid down more (P = 0.025) after the second enrichment exposure. The neutral hormonal impact on the animals coupled with the behavioral changes indicates that this enrichment is successful at altering the animals' behavior without adding physiological stress to their environments. These findings, combined with the low cost and versatility of the enrichment, promote the use of this enrichment to enhance large felid enclosures. Zoo Biol. 9999:1-8, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Zoo Biology 12/2014;
  • A. Das, M.L. Smith, M. Saini, Shrikant Katole, S.S. Kullu, B.K. Gupta, A.K. Sharma, D. Swarup
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    ABSTRACT: In order to study the effect of concentrates restriction on feed consumption, diet digestibility, and utilization of nitrogen in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), two feeding trials were conducted on three juveniles, four sub-adults, and three adults. During trial I, the conventional zoo diets of juveniles, sub-adults, and adult contained 22, 17, and 16% of concentrates on dry matter (DM) basis, respectively. During trial II, the amount of concentrate was reduced by 50%. A digestion trial of five days collection period was conducted during each period. The animals ate more roughages when concentrates were restricted. Intake of DM (g/kg BW0.75/day) was highest in sub-adults, followed by juveniles and adults. Apparent digestibility of crude protein (CP), neutral detergent soluble (NDS), and supply of digestible energy (DE) was highest in juveniles, followed by sub-adults and adults. Based upon the estimated metabolic fecal nitrogen (MFN) and calculated endogenous urinary nitrogen (EUN) and dermal losses, minimum dietary CP required to meet maintenance requirement was estimated to be 6.12, 6.05, and 5.97% in juveniles, sub-adults, and adults, respectively. Restriction of concentrates resulted in decreased (P < 0.05) digestibility of DM and GE, but the diet still supplied adequate amounts of DE and CP to fulfill estimated requirements of energy and protein during the period of experimentation. Thus, the concentrates portion of the diets of captive Asian elephants should be fed in a restricted way so as to reduce the intake of excessive calories and the potential risk of obesity. Zoo Biol. 9999:1–11, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Zoo Biology 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Crested ibis (Nipponia nippon), an endan gered native bird, was called the “precious stone” of oriental birds. N. nippon was considered a critically endangered species in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and a first-class national protected animal in China. The Chinese government had exerted considerable effort to protect the N. nippon population. An effective approach to increase the number of these birds was captive breeding. However, several pathogens, including parasites, could jeopardize the health of this species. The present study used the fecal flotation method to determine prevalence of intestinal parasites in fresh stool samples by wet mount smearing and iodine staining. Samples were obtained from 63 randomly selected crested ibis bred in Shaanxi Rare Wildlife Rescuing and Breeding Research Center in Zhouzhi County, Xi'an City, Shaanxi Province, China. In the 63 captive individuals, 38 were found positive for intestinal parasites (60.3%, 38/63). Of positive birds, high prevalence of Ascaris spp. (84.2%, 32/38) and Capillaria caudinflata (50.0%, 19/38) were detected. Coccidea (7.8%, 3/38), Fasciolidae (23.7%, 9/38), Blastocystis spp. (15.8%, 6/38), and Entamoeba histolytica (7.8%, 3/38) showed relatively low prevalence rates. This study focuses on the morphological identification of Ascaris spp. and C. caudinflata and their transmission in the N. nippon population. We introduce strategies to improve the breeding management of the birds, enhance their health, and stimulate population productivity. Zoo Biol. XX:XX–XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Zoo Biology 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In zoos, life expectancy—the average lifespan of individuals within a population, and longevity—the maximum lifespan within a population, can be useful parameters for evaluating captive husbandry and animal welfare. Using life history and demographic data derived from regional studbooks, this study examined life expectancy and longevity in a total of 782 wild-caught (WC) and captive-bred (CB) varanid lizards of seven species maintained in North American zoos since 1926. The average lifespans for WC and CB animals were 6.3 ± 0.3 and 9.3 ± 0.4 years, respectively, with CB males living significantly longer than females (P = 0.009). A total of 26.4% of WC and 22.5% of CB animals experienced mortality during their first 2 years in captivity, with mortality during this period greatest among Varanus rudicollis and V. prasinus. A positive correlation was observed between life expectancy and adult body mass in captive-bred individuals (r = 0.981; P = 0.002). Wild-caught females with a history of successful reproduction had a significantly greater average lifespan than non-reproducing females (P < 0.0001). Results from this study suggest that varanids have not been reaching their lifespan capacities in North American zoos. In light of these findings, several husbandry-related factors which may be affecting the welfare and lifespans of varanids in zoos are identified and discussed. This study also highlights the utility of demographic and life history data in captive animal management, and offers a general framework for future herpetological studies of a similar nature. Zoo Biol. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Zoo Biology 12/2014;
  • Zoo Biology 11/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: For the first time worldwide, fertilized eggs of ribbon eels (Rhinomuraena quaesita) hatched into feeding preleptocephali and could be kept alive for a period of seven days in the Vienna Zoo. The study reports on husbandry, behavioral observations and dimensions of eggs and preleptocephalus larvae. Furthermore, body color variations of ribbon eels in captivity do not reflect its sex or sexual maturity. Zoo Biol. XXXX:1–4, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Zoo Biology 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Elephant sharks (Callorhinchus milii) have the slowest evolving genome of all vertebrates and are an interesting model species for evolution research and a prized display animal. However, their deep water habitat, short breeding season, fragility, and susceptibility to stress-induced mortality have made them difficult animals to capture, keep in captivity, and obtain fertilized eggs from. Gravid females were captured by rod and reel from Western Port Bay, Australia and transferred to a 40 000 L closed aquaculture system to lay their eggs before being released. The water quality parameters, averaged over three seasons of 4–6 weeks (mean ± standard deviation) were: 16.8°C ± 2.31, salinity 37.1 ± 2.9 g/L, ammonia 0.137 ± 0.2 mg/L, nitrite levels 0.89 ± 0.9 mg/L, nitrate 66.8 ± 45.6 mg/L, pH 7.8 ± 0.18, dissolved oxygen levels 93.6 ± 5.3%, ORP 307 ± 63.3 mV. Eggs were incubated in purpose-built egg cages and embryos hatched after 143.6 days ± 1.3 at 16.9 ± 0.9°C of incubation. These procedures led to no adult mortality in the last 2 years and 620 eggs with known deposition date were collected over 4 years, of which 81.5% (±4.8) were viable. Collection of abundant embryological material with known deposition date is of paramount importance for evolutionary developmental research. We attribute this success to excellent water quality, maximum reduction of stress during capture, transport, handling, and captive care. Zoo Biol. XX:XX–XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Zoo Biology 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: There is substantial evidence in the literature that the offspring of many mammal species prefer a particular pair of nipples. There is also a definite “nipple order” in individual litters in which each young predominantly uses one or two particular nipples. In combination with early competitive interactions, such “constancy” can play an important role in the social development of the young. In this study, we reveal an unequal use of different pairs of mothers' nipples by 42 Eurasian lynx cubs in 16 litters and investigate the relationship of this phenomenon with the early competitive interactions of the cubs and their physical development. For the lynx cubs, the most often used pair of nipples is the middle pair. There is also definite “nipple order” in each litter. We found a negative correlation between nipples use by the offspring and their competitive activity. No influence of “nipple order” on the cubs' growth rate was detected. Zoo Biol. XX:XX–XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals Inc.
    Zoo Biology 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Conservation breeding programmes are a tool used to prevent amphibian extinctions. The husbandry requirements of amphibians are complex. Ongoing research is needed to ensure optimal management of those captive-bred animals destined, in particular, for reintroduction. The UV-B and vitamin D3 requirements of amphibians are largely unknown. Metabolic bone disease has been reported in a number of species. These include the Critically Endangered mountain chicken frog (Leptodactylus fallax) reared in captivity on diets supplemented with a high-calcium multivitamin and mineral supplement containing vitamin D3 but without UV-B provision. Captive-bred L. fallax being reared for reintroduction to Montserrat were provided with UV-B radiation from metamorphosis and were fed on insects supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Overlapping heat, light and UV-B gradients were provided, mimicking what we believe best represents the natural situation and thereby facilitated self-regulation of UV-B exposure. A subset of 10 frogs was periodically radiographed to assess skeletal health. Radiographic bone density and anatomical integrity appeared unremarkable when compared with a wild caught L. fallax. In addition to other routine health-screening, we recommend that radiography be performed to a structured schedule on a subset of all captive-bred and reared amphibians to assess skeletal health and to gauge the appropriateness of captive husbandry. We demonstrate here that, through the appropriate provision of a combination of both UV-B radiation and dietary supplementation, L. fallax can be bred and reared in captivity with healthy skeletal development. Zoo Biol. XX:XX–XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Zoo Biology 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The captive breeding program for the endangered Puerto Rican crested toad (Peltophryne [Bufo] lemur) has been hampered by an undiagnosed condition called “Brown Skin Disease” (BSD). Toads develop widespread skin darkening, skin thickening and abnormal shedding and eventually succumb to a chronic loss of viability. This project evaluated the marine toad (Bufo marinus) as a model for the PRCT, examining vitamin A deficiency as a potential cause of BSD. Wild caught marine toads had significantly higher liver vitamin A concentrations (61.89 ± 63.49 µg/g) than captive born marine toads (0.58 ± 0.59 µg/g); P < 0.001). A significant difference in serum vitamin A concentration was found between the captive and wild caught toads (P = 0.013) and between the low vitamin A-fed and wild caught toads (P = 0.004), when controlling for liver vitamin A concentrations. After captive toads were treated with topical and/or oral vitamin A, their hepatic vitamin A concentrations were similar to those of the wild toads, averaging 48.41 ± 37.03 µg/g. However, plasma vitamin A concentrations pre- and post-vitamin A supplementation did not differ statistically. We concluded that plasma vitamin A concentrations do not provide a linear indication of liver/body vitamin A status, and that both topical and oral supplementation with an oil-based vitamin A formulation can increase liver stores in amphibians. No evidence of BSD or other signs of deficiency were noted in the marine toads, although this feeding trial was relatively short (127 days). To date, clinical, pathological and research findings do not support vitamin A deficiency as a primary factor underlying BSD. Zoo Biol. XX:XX–XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Zoo Biology 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Several species in captivity develop nutritional diseases including vitamin A deficiency; cases of this disease have been documented in amphibians, which may be linked to an insectivorous diet lacking in vitamin A or carotenoids. Adults and young of Dyscophus guineti were fed three diets over 9 weeks to evaluate effects on carotenoids and vitamin A status and skin pigmentation. Feeder crickets were either supplemented with soy oil (control, CON), soy oil enriched with β-carotene (BC) or mixed carotenoids (MIX) by direct injection of known dosages. Vitamin A from feeder crickets (measured as retinol) was higher in insects supplemented with both BC and MIX; (P = 0.0001) and plasma retinol concentrations were significantly higher in frogs fed MIX (P < 0.02). Results suggest that both false tomato frogs and feeder crickets could receive some provitamin A activity through consumption of diets supplemented with β-carotene, and xanthophylls like lutein and zeaxanthin. Pigmentation was evaluated weekly through the use of visual color charts, as well as quantitatively using a hand-held spectrophotometer. MIX diets had a significant effect on skin color values (P < 0.0001), as well as on lightness (P = 0.0005) and hue (P = 0.0022). Results indicated that frogs fed with BC changed to yellower colors, and frogs fed with MIX changed to oranger colors. Visual color chart observations also scored significantly different between CON and MIX diets (P < 0.05); the animals fed MIX also appeared oranger according to the qualitative observations. Dietary supplements with carotenoids resulted in color changes and higher circulating retinol concentrations in false tomato frogs. These pigments may provide provitamin A activity in diets, thus may support improved nutrition and health of captive—fed insectivorous amphibians. Zoo Biol. XX:XX–XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals Inc.
    Zoo Biology 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Herein, we report a 25-year-old male polar bear suffering from a pancreatic islet cell tumor. The aim of this report is to present a case of this rare tumor in a captive polar bear. The implication of potential risk factors such as high carbohydrate diet or the presence of amyloid fibril deposits was assessed. Necropsy examination revealed several other changes, including nodules observed in the liver, spleen, pancreas, intestine, and thyroid glands that were submitted for histopathologic analysis. Interestingly, the multiple neoplastic nodules were unrelated and included a pancreatic islet cell tumor. Immunohistochemistry of the pancreas confirmed the presence of insulin and islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) within the pancreatic islet cells. The IAPP gene was extracted from the paraffin-embedded liver tissue and sequenced. IAPP cDNA from the polar bear exhibits some differences as compared to the sequence published for several other species. Different factors responsible for neoplasms in bears such as diet, infectious agents, and industrial chemical exposure are reviewed. This case report raised several issues that further studies may address by evaluating the prevalence of cancers in captive or wild animals. Zoo Biol. XX:XX–XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Zoo Biology 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We propose that regular urine samples can be used to monitor and characterize the reproductive cycle of the wombat, but this approach has never before been attempted in a marsupial. We conducted a three stage conditioning process for non-invasive urine collection in captive female wombats, which included (1) initial habituation and observation of urination patterns; (2) classical association of a stimulus with urination and (3) urine collection with the classically-conditioned stimulus. Four of the five female wombats selected for this trial were successfully conditioned for urine collection. During stage 2, the animals urinated in response to tactile stimulation 96 times from 208 attempts (46%). In stage 3, urine was successfully collected 399 times from 485 attempts (82%), with the majority of samples being collected in the morning (280/388). Hand-raised females that were previously conditioned for toileting purposes as pouch young responded more rapidly to the stimulus than juvenile females with no prior conditioning. This study is the first description of a successful method of urine collection by classical conditioning in a marsupial. Zoo Biol. XX:XX–XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Zoo Biology 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Over the last 25 years, numerous studies have investigated the impact of insect supplementation on insect nutrient content. In light of recent nutrition related challenges with regards to zoo amphibians fed an insect based diet, this review attempts to comprehensively compile both anecdotal and published data in the context of practical application on this topic. Insects, primarily crickets, used for amphibian diets historically demonstrate low concentrations of key nutrients including calcium and vitamin A. Commonly used practices for supplementation involving powder dusting or gut loading have been shown to improve delivery of calcium and vitamin A, though often not reaching desired nutrient concentrations. The large variety of factors influencing insect nutrient content are difficult to control, making study design, and results often inconsistent. Formulation and availability of more effective gut loading diets, combined with a standardized protocol for insect husbandry and dietary management may be the most effective way to supplement insects for use in amphibian feeding programs. Ideally, the nutritional improvement of feeder insects would begin at the breeder level; however, until this becomes a viable choice, we confirm that supplementation of crickets through both gut-loading and dusting appear necessary to support the nutritional health of amphibians and other insectivores in managed collections. Zoo Biol. XX:XX–XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Zoo Biology 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The success of ex situ survival assurance populations as tools for amphibian conservation depends on the health and reproductive success of founder populations. Necropsy examination and histopathology of animals that die in assurance populations are useful for the identification of population-limiting disease problems and can help to direct applied research efforts in areas such as amphibian husbandry and nutrition. This study reviewed postmortem findings in 167 frogs from 13 species that died in a large Panamanian rescue and survival assurance population between 2006 and 2011. Common problems identified in long-term captive animals, especially in Atelopus species, were epithelial squamous metaplasia suggestive of vitamin A deficiency and a polycystic nephropathy resembling lesions seen in laboratory animals with electrolyte imbalances. Metabolic bone disease was a significant contributor to morbidity in captive-bred juvenile frogs of Gastrotheca cornuta, Hemiphractus fasciatus, and Hylomantis lemur. Findings common to multiple species included poor overall nutritional condition that was sometimes attributable to maladaptation to captive husbandry and epidermal hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis possibly reflecting environmental skin irritation. Infectious diseases and endoparasitism were most common in recently captured animals and included chytridiomycosis and Rhabdias sp. lungworms. Applied research efforts to improve sustainability of survival assurance populations should focus on elucidating optimal husbandry practices for diverse species, improving methods for nutritional supplementation of cultured insects and examination of the role of water composition in disease development. Zoo Biol. XX:XX–XX, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals Inc.
    Zoo Biology 09/2014;