Maternal and Child Health Journal (MATERN CHILD HLTH J )

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Description

Maternal and Child Health Journal is the first exclusive forum to advance the scientific and professional knowledge base of the maternal and child health (MCH) field. This quarterly provides peer-reviewed papers addressing the following areas of MCH practice policy and research: MCH epidemiology demography and health status assessment Innovative MCH service initiatives Implementation of MCH programs MCH policy analysis and advocacy MCH professional development. Exploring the full spectrum of the MCH field Maternal and Child Health Journal is an important tool for practitioners as well as academics in public health obstetrics gynecology prenatal medicine pediatrics and neonatology. Sponsors include the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP) the Association of Teachers of Maternal and Child Health (ATMCH) and CityMatCH.

  • Impact factor
    2.24
  • 5-year impact
    2.38
  • Cited half-life
    4.70
  • Immediacy index
    0.28
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.80
  • Website
    Maternal and Child Health Journal website
  • Other titles
    Maternal and child health journal (Online)
  • ISSN
    1092-7875
  • OCLC
    45091969
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to identify determinants of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) at the individual, family, community, and organizational level. This study was a secondary analysis of data from a multilevel promotion of EBF program in two rural public health centers (PHCs) in the Demak district, Central Java, Indonesia. The program was a quasi-experimental study with a pretest–posttest control group. A total of 599 participants were enrolled, consisting of 163 mother infant pairs, 163 fathers, 163 grandmothers, 82 community leaders, and 28 midwives. EBF duration and its determinants were measured and analyzed using Cox proportional-hazard model. Mothers with a high level of breastfeeding knowledge had the greatest EBF duration. Mothers who had a knowledge score >80 had a 73 % (HR 0.27, 95 % CI 0.15, 0.48) greater chance of EBF compared to mothers who had a knowledge score of 60. Factors which shortened EBF duration were grandmother’s lack of support for EBF (HR 2.04, 95 % CI 1.33, 3.14), received formula samples at discharge (HR 1.99, 95 % CI 1.25, 3.16), and maternal experience of breast engorgement (HR 1.97, 95 % CI 1.32, 2.94). High maternal breastfeeding knowledge was the only factor associated with longer duration of EBF. Barriers to EBF were breast engorgement, receiving formula samples at discharge, and a grandmother’s lack of support for EBF. Keywords: Exclusive breastfeeding, � Determinant, Maternal knowledge, � Breast engorgement,� Formula samples, � Grandmother’s lack of support for EBF
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Patriarchal traditions and a history of armed conflict in Timor-Leste provide a context that facilitates violence against women. More than a third of ever-married Timorese women report physical and/or sexual domestic violence (DV) perpetrated by their most recent partner. DV violates women's rights and may threaten their reproductive health. Marital control may also limit women's reproductive control and healthcare access. Our study investigated relationships between DV and marital control and subsequent family planning, maternal healthcare, and birth outcomes in Timor-Leste. Using logistic regression, we examined 2009-2010 Demographic and Health Survey data from a nationally representative sample of 2,951 women in Timor-Leste. We controlled for age, education, and wealth. We limited our analyses of pregnancy- and birth-related outcomes to those from the 6 months preceding the survey. Rural women with controlling husbands were less likely than other rural women to have an unmet need for family planning (Adj. OR 0.6; 95 % CI 0.4-0.9). Rural women who experienced DV were more likely than other rural women to have an unplanned pregnancy (Adj. OR 2.6; 95 % CI 1.4-4.8), fewer than four antenatal visits (Adj. OR 2.3; 95 % CI 1.1-4.9), or a baby born smaller than average (Adj. OR 3.1; 95 % CI 1.4-6.7). DV and marital control were not associated with the tested outcomes among urban women. Given high rates of DV internationally, our findings have important implications. Preventing DV may benefit both women and future generations. Furthermore, rural women who experience DV may benefit from targeted interventions that mediate associated risks of negative family planning, maternal healthcare, and birth outcomes.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Developing improved systems of care for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) requires accurate identification and stratification of this population. This study was designed to assess the ability of a brief screener to identify and stratify CSHCN in a primary care clinic to focus future quality improvement initiatives and allocate resources. All families presenting for health maintenance visits or acute care appointments at an academic primary care clinic between September 5, 2012 and September 28, 2012 were asked to complete the CSHCN Screener(©). This panel of patients was compared to registries previously created by: (1) retrospective chart reviews using published lists of International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD9) codes for CSHCN and (2) direct physician referral to a clinic case manager providing care coordination services to CSHCN. Screeners identified 246 CSHCN (16.8 % of unique completed screeners). Scores ranged from 0 to 5; higher scores indicate higher levels of complexity. Patients with positive screens had a mean score of 2.4. Patients previously identified by retrospective ICD9 search who completed a screener had a mean score of 1.6 with nearly one-half having negative screens. Patients previously identified by physician referral who completed a screener had a mean score of 2.7 with nearly one-half having scores of 4 or 5. The CSHCN Screener(©) can be utilized in an academic primary care clinic to prospectively identify CSHCN and potentially offers a more clinically meaningful method of identification given its inherent ability to stratify this population based on complexity of medical needs.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Despite notable progress in Millennium Development Goal (MDG) five, to reduce maternal deaths three-quarters by 2015, deaths due to treatable conditions during pregnancy and childbirth continue to concentrate in the developing world. Expanding access to three effective and low-cost maternal health drugs can reduce preventable maternal deaths, if available to all women. However, current failures in markets for maternal health drugs limit access to lifesaving medicines among those most in need. In effort to stimulate renewed action planning in the post-MDG era, we present three case examples from other global health initiatives to illustrate how market shaping strategies can scale-up access to essential maternal health drugs. Such strategies include: sharing intelligence among suppliers and users to better approximate and address unmet need for maternal health drugs, introducing innovative financial strategies to catalyze otherwise unattractive markets for drug manufacturers, and employing market segmentation to create a viable and sustainable market. By building on lessons learned from other market shaping interventions and capitalizing on opportunities for renewed action planning and partnership, the maternal health field can utilize market dynamics to better ensure sustainable and equitable distribution of essential maternal health drugs to all women, including the most marginalized.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Acculturation has been shown to positively and negatively affect Latino health. Little research investigates the overlap between acculturation and the different types of relationship violence among Latino youth and most research in this area predominantly involves Mexican–American samples. The current study examined associations between indices of acculturation (language use at home, chosen survey language, and nativity) and relationship physical violence and sexual coercion, both received and delivered, among predominantly Dominican and Puerto Rican adolescents from New York City. From 2006 to 2007, 1,454 adolescents aged 13–21 years in New York City completed an anonymous survey that included the Conflict in Adolescent Relationships Inventory which estimates experiences of physical violence and sexual coercion, both received and delivered, in the previous year. This analysis includes bivariate and multivariate methods to test the associations between language use at home, chosen survey language, and nativity with the different types of relationship violence. Among females, there is a significant association between language use at home and overall level of acculturation with delivering and receiving relationship physical violence; however, we did not find this association in delivering and receiving relationship sexual coercion. We found no association between acculturation and any type of relationship violence among males. Among Latina females, language spoken at home is an indicator of other protective factors of physical relationship violence. Future research in this area should explore the potential protective factors surrounding relationship violence among Latina females of various subgroups using comprehensive measures of acculturation, household composition and family engagement.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the characteristics of infants with bilateral Stage 4b or 5 ROP (i.e. with subtotal or total retinal detachment) who presented to eye departments in two major cities in Mexico, to identify reasons why they may have become blind in order to recommend how programs could be improved. A large case-series of infants with Stage 4b or 5 ROP in both eyes confirmed by ultrasound who attended the ROP Clinic, Hospital Civil de Guadalajara from September 2010 to November 2012, and the Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez from December 2011 to December 2012 were identified from the diagnostic databases of each hospital. Mothers of infants in Guadalajara had a telephone interview. 89/94 eligible infants were included in the study, 48 in Guadalajara and 41 in Mexico City. Cases came from 22 of the 32 states in Mexico. Half of the infants attending Guadalajara 24/48 (50 %) had been cared for in NICUs without ROP screening programs and were not examined. Among the 24 infants cared for in NICUs with ROP programs, 7/24 (29.1 %) mothers reported that their infant had not been examined while in the NICU, and a further 9/24 (37.5 %) were either not referred for screening after discharge or they did not attend. Two infants had failed laser treatment. Strategies and resources to prevent end stage ROP have not been firmly established in Mexico. There is an urgent need to expand the coverage and quality of ROP programs, to ensure that existing screening guidelines are better adhered to, and to improve communication with parents.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to identify factors that influenced stress, healthy eating and physical activity among low-income overweight or obese pregnant women. We conducted seven focus groups with 96 low-income overweight and obese pregnant women. Common themes were identified from audio tapes and transcripts. Women said that poor communication affected their relationships with spouses or significant others. They were frustrated or upset with significant others for three key reasons: failure to understand or listen to the pregnant women's pregnancy concerns, refusal to be helpful when asked and being overly concerned with the woman's safety. Most women said that they were emotional and took naps throughout the day after becoming pregnant. Many withdrew from their social interactions. They also faced numerous challenges that made healthy eating more difficult, e.g., craving for unhealthy foods and eating foods for comfort. To eat healthier, some reminded themselves to avoid overeating or stop eating in the car. Women were not physically active because of tiredness, lack of motivation, inadequate social support, or bad weather. Some stayed physically active to prevent excessive pregnancy weight gain and have an easier labor. Women equivocally said weighing themselves to manage weight would add to their stress and make them feel more depressed. When designing interventions to help low-income overweight and obese pregnant women avoid excessive pregnancy weight gain, it is important to include information and practical advice on stress management, emphasizing effective communication skills with significant others and helping them plan effective ways to manage negative feelings.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In December of 2007, the Federal Register published an Interim Rule establishing revised food packages for participants in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) that was implemented by states in 2009. We analyze changes in breastfeeding among WIC participants from the period before to period after implementation of the new food package We used linear regression to analyze data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) in 19 states from 2004 to 2010, the Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System (PedNSS) in 16 states monthly from January 2007 to October 2010 and the National Immunization Survey (NIS) from all 50 states and the District of Columbia from 2004 to 2010 for evidence of an association between time-series patterns of breastfeeding among women or children who participated in WIC and changes in the new food package. Data from all three sources evidenced steady upward trends in ever breastfed infants on WIC during the study period. In neither PRAMS nor the NIS were trends in breastfeeding after implementation of the new food package statistically different from trends in breastfeeding among low-income women not on WIC. We also uncovered no break in monthly breastfeeding rates by birth cohort associated with new food package in the PedNSS. Rates of ever breastfed children are rising nationally but the increase is not associated with changes in WIC's new food package as evidenced in national and state surveys of postpartum women.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this article is to describe how the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Leadership Competencies (v 3.0) were used to examine and improve an MCH Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) training curriculum for New Hampshire and Maine. Over 15 % of the nation's children experience neurodevelopmental disabilities or special health care needs and estimates suggest 1 in every 68 children is diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. Across the Unites States critical shortages of qualified MCH professionals exist, particularly in poor and rural areas. A continued investment in training interdisciplinary leaders is critical. The MCH Leadership Competencies provide an effective foundation for leadership training through identification of requisite knowledge, skills, and dispositions required of MCH leaders. This paper describes a three-step process, which began in 2010 and included utilizing the MCH Leadership Competencies as a tool to reflect on, develop, and evaluate the NH LEND leadership curriculum. Curriculum development was further supported through participation in a multi-state learning collaborative. Through a series of intentional decisions, the curriculum design of NH LEND utilized the competencies and evidence-based principles of instruction to engage trainees in the development of specific MCH content knowledge and leadership skills. The LEND network specifically, and MCH leadership programs more broadly, may benefit from the intentional use of the MCH competencies to assist in curriculum development and program evaluation, and as a means to support trainees in identifying specific leadership goals and evaluating their leadership skill development.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about the long-term mental health of women following the birth of an infant. This study describes the 21 year trajectory of women's depression following the birth of an infant and identifies early predictors of post-birth maternal depression trajectories. The sample comprises 2,991 women from the Mater and University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy. Using the Delusions-Symptoms-States-Inventory, depression was measured at 6 months, 5, 14 and 21 years after the birth. These measures were clustered and in addition bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to test for significant association between the groups and a range of maternal socio-demographic, psychological and pregnancy-related factors. Two depression trajectories were produced, a no-low depression group (79.0 %) and a high-escalating depression group (21.0 %). The strongest predictors for a high-escalating depression group were conflict in the partner-relationship (p < 0.001), anxiety (p < 0.001) and stress (p < 0.001) in the antenatal period, having many pregnancy symptoms (p < 0.001), being younger (p < 0.001) and having poorer social networks (p < 0.001). To a lesser extent not completing high school (p < 0.05), being unsure about wanting the pregnancy (p < 0.05) and not wanting contact with the infant following the birth (p < 0.05) were also predictors for high-escalating depression trajectory. Our findings suggest a sub-sample of mothers experience persistent depressive symptoms over a 21 year period following the birth of their infant. Partner conflict, inadequate social supports and poor mental health during the pregnancy, rather than factors relating to the birth event, contribute to women's depressive symptoms in the long-term. Given the identification of early markers for persistent depression, there may be opportunities for intervention for at-risk pregnant women.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Maternal and child health (MCH) leadership requires an understanding of MCH populations and systems as well as continuous pursuit of new knowledge and skills. This paper describes the development, structure, and implementation of the MCH Navigator, a web-based portal for ongoing education and training for a diverse MCH workforce. Early development of the portal focused on organizing high quality, free, web-based learning opportunities that support established learning competencies without duplicating existing resources. An academic-practice workgroup developed a conceptual model based on the MCH Leadership Competencies, the Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals, and a structured review of MCH job responsibilities. The workgroup used a multi-step process to cull the hundreds of relevant, but widely scattered, trainings and select those most valuable for the primary target audiences of state and local MCH professionals and programs. The MCH Navigator now features 248 learning opportunities, with additional tools to support their use. Formative assessment findings indicate that the portal is widely used and valued by its primary audiences, and promotes both an individual's professional development and an organizational culture of continuous learning. Professionals in practice and academic settings are using the MCH Navigator for orientation of new staff and advisors, "just in time" training for specific job functions, creating individualized professional development plans, and supplementing course content. To achieve its intended impact and ensure the timeliness and quality of the Navigator's content and functions, the MCH Navigator will need to be sustained through ongoing partnership with state and local MCH professionals and the MCH academic community.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 08/2014;
  • Maternal and Child Health Journal 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: While witnessing violence between parents is one of the most consistent correlates of experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) in later life, little research exists in developing countries on the effects of witnessing interparental IPV on young adults' involvement with family violence. This study examines the relation between witnessing interparental IPV and young adults' subsequent use and experience with family intimidation and physical abuse (FIPA) in Cebu, Philippines. Using data from the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey, recent use and experience of FIPA among 21-22 year old young adults was assessed through self-reports from the 2005 survey, and childhood witnessing of interparental IPV assessed from the 2002 survey. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the effect of witnessing interparental IPV on young adults' use and experience of FIPA. Among all young adults, witnessing paternal perpetration of IPV predicted using FIPA, and witnessing maternal perpetration predicted experiencing FIPA. Among young adult females only, witnessing reciprocal IPV between parents predicted experiencing FIPA. Witnessing paternal perpetration of IPV among young adult males, maternal perpetration among young adult females, and reciprocal interparental IPV among all young adults predicted young adults both using and experiencing FIPA. Violence prevention efforts should reach all family members through family centered interventions. School based curricula, which largely focus on intimate partner and peer violence, should recognize adolescents' use and experience of violence with family members, and design modules accordingly. Further research on gender differences in family violence is recommended.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity stigma has been linked to poor health outcomes on an individual and population basis. However, little research has been conducted on the role of chronic or recent obesity stigma in the health disparities experienced by pregnant women with high body mass index. The purpose of this article is to discuss poor birth outcomes in this population from an integrated perinatal health framework perspective, incorporating obesity stigma as a social determinant. In studies of non-pregnant populations, obesity stigma has been associated with stress, unhealthy coping strategies, psychological disorders, and exacerbations of physical illness. This article examines the mechanisms by which obesity stigma influences health outcomes and suggests how they might apply to selected complications of pregnancy, including macrosomia, preterm birth and cesarean delivery. Given the rates of obesity and associated pregnancy complications in the United States, it is critical to examine the determinants of those problems from a life course and multiple determinants perspective. This paper offers a conceptual framework to guide exploratory research in this area, incorporating the construct of obesity stigma.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study estimated the prevalence of maternal depressive symptoms and tested associations between maternal depressive symptoms and healthcare utilization and expenditures among United States publicly insured children with chronic health conditions (CCHC). A total of 6,060 publicly insured CCHC from the 2004-2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys were analyzed using negative binomial models to compare healthcare utilization for CCHC of mothers with and without depressive symptoms. Annual healthcare expenditures for both groups were compared using a two-part model with a logistic regression and generalized linear model. The prevalence of depressive symptoms among mothers with CCHC was 19 %. There were no differences in annual healthcare utilization for CCHC of mothers with and without depressive symptoms. Maternal depressive symptoms were associated with greater odds of ED expenditures [odds ratio (OR) 1.26; 95 % CI 1.03-1.54] and lesser odds of dental expenditures (OR 0.81; 95 % CI 0.66-0.98) and total expenditures (OR 0.71; 95 % CI 0.51-0.98). Children of symptomatic mothers had lower predicted outpatient expenditures and higher predicted expenditures for total health, prescription medications, dental care; and office based, inpatient and ED visits. Mothers with CCHC were more likely to report depressive symptoms than were mothers with children without chronic health conditions. There were few differences in annual healthcare utilization and expenditures between CCHC of mothers with and without depressive symptoms. However, having a mother with depressive symptoms was associated with higher ED expenditures and higher predicted healthcare expenditures in a population of children who comprise over three-fourths of the top decile of Medicaid spending.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Workforce development is a priority across many state Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Title V programs. Three case studies were conducted to explore varied state implementations of MCH workforce development initiatives. Three states utilized the online MCH Navigator resource to support orientation and ongoing professional development for staff and other partners. Key informant interviews and surveys were utilized to gather staff feedback on practical aspects of the project and to ascertain lessons learned by state MCH leadership during project implementation. Staff impressions of the MCH Navigator were generally positive. Staff reported that Navigator modules were useful to their current work and that completion of the modules resulted in expanded knowledge in key MCH competency areas and contributed to their professional development. Many indicated that they would recommend use of the Navigator to colleagues. State leaders found that utilization of introductory training sessions or the Navigator's online orientation modules were helpful in acclimating staff to the Navigator, although some staff still experienced minor technical challenges. State leaders across all three sites reported the value of pre-existing tools on the Navigator site, including core competency self-assessments and orientation bundles; the leaders also noted that the Navigator represents a useful and thorough resource that can be integrated into state efforts to enhance professional development for MCH staff. The significant variation between the three states' implementations demonstrates the flexibility of the Navigator, highlighting its utility to meet state-specific needs.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Environmental exposures during pregnancy have a lasting impact on children’s health. We combined environmental and maternal risk factor survey data to inform efforts to protect children’s health. We made recommendations for future use of such data. A modified version of the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) mail survey was conducted based on weighted sampling design with low-income and non-low income women in Monroe County, NY (1,022 respondents). A series of environmental questions were included in the questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Chi square tests and Poisson loglinear regression model to identify patterns in environmental health risk and sociodemographic characteristics. We identified women who rented their homes, had lower incomes, and lived in inner city zip codes as “high environmental health risk” (HEHR). HEHR respondents were more likely to report that a health care provider talked with them about lead and on average reported more behaviors to protect their children from lead poisoning. Combining environmental and perinatal risk factor data could yield important recommendations for medical practice, health education, and policy development. However, at present PRAMS gathers only limited and inconsistent environmental data. We found that existing PRAMS environmental questions are insufficient. Further work is needed to develop updated and more comprehensive environmental health survey questions and implement them consistently across the country.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 07/2014; 18(5).