Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science (Meas Phys Educ Exerc Sci )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

This journal exists that covers a wide variety of subjects in the area of measurement research in physical education and exercise science. Each journal section is devoted to theoretical and methodological issues in measurement and statistics. Theoretical/Issues--contains articles pertaining to theoretical development in measurement and statistics in physical education and exercise science. Methodological--contains empirical investigation of measurement and statistical tools used within physical education and exercise science. Tutorials--includes articles on how to appropriately use new or existing measurement procedures as well as information on the appropriate use of statistical techniques. Applied Research--includes validity, reliability, and objectivity studies of selected instruments from physical education and exercise science. Test/Instrument Development--includes research designed to develop skill tests, fitness tests, psychological tests, competency based tests, equipment or any other test or test procedure with application to physical education and exercise science. Evaluation--includes articles relating to grading, norming, standards, and performance assessment in physical education and exercise science. Teacher's Toolbox--contains articles on how to teach courses in measurement including various teaching methods, successful laboratory experiences, helpful assignments, and adaptations to various student needs. Computer Software Development--features software writers' submissions of one-page descriptions of their software. The author explains the purpose of the software and provides directions and how the software may be obtained. Reviews--gives the latest reviews and article abstracts pertaining to testing, measurement, evaluation, and statistics. This section also contains a summary of measurement research in other journals. Commentary--contains position statements and commentary relating to testing, measurement, evaluation, and statistics within physical education and exercise science. Every quarterly issue presents a wide array of measurement and evaluation topics. The journal is essential reading for anyone who has a use for quality measurement information in the fields of physical education and exercise science. As a peer-reviewed publication, Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science is absolutely devoted to bringing the best research, test development, evaluation, and so much more.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science website
  • Other titles
    Measurement in physical education and exercise science (Online), Measurement in physical education and exercise science
  • ISSN
    1091-367X
  • OCLC
    45007135
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although coach burnout has been studied for 30 years, what measure to use in this context has not yet been problematized. This study focuses on evaluating convergent and discriminant validity of three coach burnout measures by using multi-trait/multi-method analysis (CT-C[M-1]) model. We choose Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the two dimensional Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI), and a coach version of Athlete Burnout Questionnaire (CBQ). Our analysis shows that MBI and OLBI cover similar definitions of exhaustion and depersonalization/disengagement and that CBQ measures somewhat different dimensions. A problem for OLBI is a lack of discriminant validity due to high correlations between exhaustion and disengagement. For lack of personal accomplishment/reduced sense of accomplishment CBQ measures a somewhat different construct than MBI. Although all three measures have advantages and disadvantages, we promote CBQ since it discriminates between dimensions and covers important aspects of burnout in a sports context that the other two do not cover.
    Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science 06/2014; 18(3):209-226.
  • Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science 04/2013; 17(2):167-169.
  • Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science 10/2012; 16:268-283.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to develop and calibrate an assessment system, or bank, using the latest measurement theories and methods to promote valid and reliable student assessment in physical education. Using an anchor-test equating design, a total of 30 items or assessments were administered to 5,021 (2,568 boys and 2,453 girls) students in Kindergarten and Grades 2 and 5. Their performances were video-taped and rated using 4-point scoring rubrics. The coded data were analyzed using the many-faceted Rasch model, with three defined facets: items, rubrics, and students. Data from Grade 2 were analyzed first, followed by Kindergarten and Grade 5, with the later two anchored on the scale of Grade 2. It was found that the model-data fit well and item difficulties were well spread (Kindergarten: –1.52 to –0.13, Grade 2: –1.22 to 1.29, and Grade 5: –1.26 to 0.44 logits). As a result, an assessment bank was established. An anchor-test equating design allows comparison of students' performance across grades using different items. The development and calibration of the bank serves as a good example for future test/assessment development and application in physical education.
    Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science 04/2011; 15(2):119-137.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article describes how assessments in PE Metrics were developed following six steps: (a) determining test blueprint, (b) writing assessment tasks and scoring rubrics, (c) establishing content validity, (d) piloting assessments, (e) conducting item analysis, and (f) modifying the assessments based on analysis and expert opinion. A task force, composed of researchers, measurement and evaluation experts, teacher educators, K–12 physical education teachers, and education administrators, was formulated. The task force then determined a test blueprint for Grades K, 2, and 5 and developed corresponding assessments to assess the standards. The content validity evidence was established by a panel of experts examining the degree to which the content of the assessments matched the content of the national standards, specifically Standard 1. A total of 30 assessments (Kindergarten = 8, Grade 2 = 11, and Grade 5 = 11) were developed. They were piloted to a total of 773 students (Kindergarten = 232, Grade 2 = 268, and Grade 5 = 273). Descriptive statistics (e.g., M, SD, frequency) were computed for each assessment. More than 50% of the means were between 2.2 and 2.8 (on a 4-point scoring rubric). Assessment responses were well distributed; only 2.2% had an SD of 0, which indicates that assessments were well developed. With some editorial changes, the assessments were ready for the final calibration of PE Metrics construction.
    Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science 04/2011; 15(2):100-118.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of outcome likelihood, outcome value, and outcome expectancy using data collected from students in secondary school physical education classes. Dependent measures were examined for construct, concurrent, and predictive validity, as well as internal and temporal reliability. The results of the investigation indicated the following. First, confirmatory factor analyses for the dependent variables (outcome likelihood, outcome value, outcome expectancy) revealed a suitable fit of the data with a hypothesized factor structure. Second, significant associations between these variables and other personal beliefs and values provided sound evidence for the concurrent validity of outcome likelihood, outcome value, and outcome expectancy. Third, results of regression analyses revealed that outcome likelihood and outcome value had strong predictive validity in predicting physical activity behaviors. Finally, the internal reliabilities of self-report scales for the outcome likelihood, outcome value, and outcome expectancy over a three-semester period were satisfactory. The temporal reliabilities were also acceptable.
    Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science 01/2011; 15:155-167.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of the SW-701 (Yamax Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and NL-800 (New-Lifestyles, Inc., Lee's Summit, Missouri, USA) pedometer in fifth-grade students while walking, skipping, galloping, sliding, and hopping. Counts registered by both pedometer models were significantly lower than actual counts while skipping, galloping, and sliding, and counts from the NL-800 were significantly lower than the SW-701 during these same movements. No significant differences in step counts were detected between actual counts and the SW-701 and between the pedometer models while walking and hopping; however, the NL-800 registered counts significantly higher than actual counts while hopping. Bland-Altman plots suggest the greatest variability occurred while skipping, galloping, and sliding, with the percent error lowest in the SW-701 during these movements. (Contains 4 tables and 2 figures.)
    Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science 12/2009;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Practitioners can benefit from using norms, but they often have to develop their own percentile rank and percentile norms. This article is a tutorial on how to quickly and easily calculate percentile rank and percentile norms using SPSS, and this information is presented for a data set. Some issues in calculating percentile rank and percentile norms are discussed, and a comparison between percentile rank and percentile norms is presented. In summary, percentile rank and percentile norms can be quickly and easily developed by using SPSS.
    Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science 10/2009; 13(4):227-233.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the test–retest reliability of the last 7-day long form International Physical Activity Questionnaire (Craig et al., 20039. Craig , C. L. , Marshall , A. L. , Sjöstrom , M. , Bauman , A. E. , Booth , M. L. Ainsworth , B. E. 2003 . International Physical Activity Questionnaire: 12-country reliability and validity . Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise , 35 : 1381 – 1395 . [CrossRef], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [CSA]View all references) and to examine the construct validity for the measure in a research setting. Participants were 151 male (n = 52) and female (n = 99) university students (M age = 24.15 years, SD = 5.01) who completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire on two separate occasions, separated by four days, and measures of physical activity motivation and competence at time one. Intraclass correlation coefficients for job-related, transportation, and household-related activities ranged from poor to acceptable (R = .42 to .73). For recreation and leisure time activity, reliabilities were fair to acceptable (R = .65 to .76). Reliability intraclass correlation coefficient values provided some support for the measure's potential usefulness in assessing job-related, walking as transportation, and moderate-intensity indoor household activities. Construct validity coefficients within and across contexts compared to physical activity motivation and competence measures were generally low (ρ = .02 to .32). Future studies should focus on improving International Physical Activity Questionnaire validity and reliability in specific contexts if its full benefits are to be realized.
    Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science 10/2009; 13(4):191-205.