Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science (J Dance Med Sci )

Publisher: International Association for Dance Medicine & Science

Description

Each issue focuses on bringing you the current results of clinical and experimental research. The aim of the Journal of Dance Medicine & Science is to provide you with one source for up-to-date information. Featured articles are drawn from the fields of:

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  • Website
    Journal of Dance Medicine and Science website
  • Other titles
    Journal of dance medicine & science (Online), Dance medicine & science, Journal of dance medicine and science
  • ISSN
    1089-313X
  • OCLC
    61314134
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The mechanical properties of dance floors have the potential to influence dancers' performance and injury risk. Little information is available that describes dancers' preferences for dance floor mechanical properties. Investigation of dancers' perceptions of varied dance floors can serve to enlighten governing bodies, floor manufacturers, and the dance community. The aim of this study was to assess the perceptions of dancers from a touring professional ballet company regarding four floors with varied force reduction (FR) that were created to replicate those used by the company in normal dance training and performance. A specialized questionnaire was developed that incorporated a series of qualitative and quantitative measures that could be used by participants to express their perceptions of the custom built dance floors. Floor FR was quantified with reference to the protocols specified by European standards. Dancer perceptions were in general agreement with floor FR values; however, some discrepancies were observed. Dancers expressed a preference for floor FR within the mid to upper limits (57% to 72%) of the European standards, although a minority preferred low FR (approximately 36%) floors. A limited ability to perceive inconsistencies in FR across test floors was observed, which may have implications for injury risk. Investigation of the perceptions of dancers from more diverse backgrounds, on floors that provide a closer representation of typical dance studio and stage sizes, over longer periods of time, would provide further insight into the perceptual and adaptive responses of dancers to varied floor mechanical properties.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 09/2014; 18(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Summer dance intensive programs are an integral part of many serious dancers' training. The risk and rate of injury in this setting have not been well studied. The goal of this data analysis is to detail the epidemiology of dance injuries reported during a summer dance intensive over a consecutive 3 year period. Data collection included information regarding the number of evaluation and treatment sessions conducted at the program's walk-in clinic, body regions injured, whether the injuries were recurrences of pre-existing conditions or newly sustained during the intensive, and at what point in the program they were recorded. Overall, more of the clinic's clientele presented with multiple injuries than with single discrete injuries. The anatomic distribution of injuries appears to be consistent with previously reported data, with the four most commonly injured body regions being ankle, pelvis and hip, knee, and lumbar spine. Injuries sustained during the intensive (IR) occurred at a 2:1 ratio to pre-intensive injuries (PR). Relative to those with PR injuries, dancers with IR injuries were far more likely to present during the first half of the program. This study is a first step toward filling a gap in the literature by describing injury incidence in a specific population within the dance community.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 09/2014; 18(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Perfectionism has been linked to various forms of physiological and psychological maladjustment. This study examined the inter-relationships between multi-dimensional aspects of perfectionism (self-oriented, other-oriented, and socially prescribed), internalized shame, and total self-concept in elite dancers (N = 24) as compared to a control group of healthy, active non-dancers (N = 23). All participants completed psychometric self-report measures targeting the variables of interest. Multivariate analysis of covariance (gender as covariate) indicated that the dancers had higher levels of self-oriented perfectionism than the control group. Building on the findings of Ashby, Rice, and Martin, we examined a model in which dancers' shame mediates the relationship between maladaptive aspects of perfectionism and self-concept. Analysis revealed internalized shame to fully mediate the relationship between dancers' socially prescribed perfectionism and total self-concept; however, shame did not mediate self-concept in the control group. We conclude that dancers would benefit from programs that enhance self-esteem and reduce the negative effects of internalized shame and self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 09/2014; 18(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium associated with various infectious diseases. Not only has the bacterium been detected in sports environments, the reported incidences of S. aureus infections have steadily increased in athletic teams. However, in spite of similarities between sports and dance facilities, to our knowledge no previous study has examined the presence of this bacterium in the dance environment. We hypothesized that S. aureus would be present in a university's dance studios, and that it would be extant in higher concentrations inside versus outside the studios. Using common microbiological culturing methods, samples were gathered from floors and barres in three studios of a single university, as well as from outside floors and railings near the studios and a conference room used by dancers. Confirming our hypothesis, we detected S. aureus in every dance studio sample (0.03 to 0.38 cfu/cm 2 ). Supporting our second hypothesis, we found that average S. aureus concentrations from the three studios were significantly higher compared to both outside and conference room samples (P ≤ 0.001). The latter two locations did not yield any S. aureus concentrations. Control samples developed as expected. The results of this study suggest that S. aureus bacteria are common on the flooring and barres of university dance studios, with the bacterial concentrations possibly dependent on the hours of usage of these surfaces. Whether the presence of S. aureus in dance studios presents a health risk to dancers should be studied further.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 09/2014; 18(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Ballet stage performances are associated with higher cardiorespiratory demand than rehearsals and classes. Hence, new interest is emerging to create periodized training that enhances dancers' fitness while minimizing delayed exercise-induced fatigue and possible injuries. Finding out in what zones of intensity dancers work during different ballet movements may support the use of supplemental training adjusted to the needs of the individual dancer. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to describe dancers' oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) responses during the performance of nine isolated ballet exercise sets, as correlated with their first and second ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2). Twelve female ballet dancers volunteered for the study. Their maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), VT1, and VT2 were determined by use of an incremental treadmill test. Nine sets of ballet movements were assessed: pliés, tendus, jetés, rond de jambes, fondus, grand adage (adage), grand battements, temps levés, and sautés. The sets were randomly executed and separated by 5 minute rest periods. ANOVA for repeated measurements followed by the Bonferroni Post-hoc test were applied (p 2 responses were as follows: pliés (17.6 ± 1.6 ml·kg-1·min-1); tendus and adage were not significantly greater than VT1; rond de jambes (21.8 ± 3.1 ml·kg-1 ·min-1); fondus and jetés were higher than VT1 and the previous exercises; grand battements (25.8 ± 2.9 ml·kg-1·min-1) was greater than all the other exercises and VT1; and VT2 was significantly higher than all ballet sets. This stratification followed closely, but not exactly, the variation in HR. For example, rond de jambes (156.8 ± 19 b·min-1) did not show any significant difference from all the other ballet sets, nor VT1 or VT2. It is concluded that the workloads of isolated ballet sets, based on VO2 responses, vary between low and moderate aerobic intensity in relation to dancers' VT1 and VT2. However, ballet set workloads may be higher when based on HR responses, due to the intermittent and isometric components of dance.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 09/2014; 18(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Low back pain (LBP) is often cited as a common condition at all levels of dance. Evidence suggests that reduced endurance of the trunk muscles can predispose an individual to LBP. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in trunk muscle endurance in a sample of tertiary level dance students with and without LBP. Seventeen full-time female dance students were divided into two groups: dance students with LBP (N = 11), and without LBP (N = 6). All participants provided informed consent, and the study was approved by an institutional ethics review board. Participants performed four isometric tests that assess trunk muscle endurance: the right and left side plank, double straight leg raise (DSLR), and the Sorensen test. A modified version of the Osaka City University test was used to assess the presence of LBP. A significant difference (p Document Type: Research Article DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12678/1089-313X.18.2.62 Affiliations: 1: Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, London, UK. ctvswain@gmail.com 2: Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, London, UK Publication date: June 1, 2014 More about this publication? Editorial Board Information for Authors Membership Information ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites $(document).ready(function() { var shortdescription = $(".originaldescription").text().replace(/\\&/g, '&').replace(/\\, '<').replace(/\\>/g, '>').replace(/\\t/g, ' ').replace(/\\n/g, ''); if (shortdescription.length > 350){ shortdescription = "" + shortdescription.substring(0,250) + "... more"; } $(".descriptionitem").prepend(shortdescription); $(".shortdescription a").click(function() { $(".shortdescription").hide(); $(".originaldescription").slideDown(); return false; }); }); Related content In this: publication By this: publisher In this Subject: Arts (General) , Medicine (General) , Therapeutics & Alternative Medicine By this author: Swain, Christopher ; Redding, Emma GA_googleFillSlot("Horizontal_banner_bottom");
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to value calibrate, cross-validate, and determine the reliability of a combined triaxial accelerometry and heart rate telemetry technique for characterizing the physiological and physical activity parameters of Latin dance. Twenty-two non-professional adult Latin dancers attended two laboratory-based dance trials each. After familiarization and a standardized warm-up, a multi-stage (3 x 5-minute) incremental (based on song tempo) Afro-Cuban salsa choreography was performed while following a video displayed on a projection screen. Data were collected with a portable indirect calorimeter, a heart rate telemeter, and wrist-, hip-, and ankle-mounted ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers. Prediction equations for energy expenditure and step count were value calibrated using forced entry multiple regression and cross-validated using a delete-one jackknife approach with additional Bland-Altman analysis. The average dance intensity reached 6.09 ± 0.96 kcal/kg/h and demanded 45.9 ± 11.3% of the heart rate reserve. Predictive ability of the derived models was satisfactory, where R(2) = 0.80; SEE = 0.44 kcal/kg/h and R(2) = 0.74; SEE = 3 step/min for energy expenditure and step count, respectively. Dependent t-tests indicated no differences between predicted and measured values for both energy expenditure (t65 = -0.25, p = 0.80) and step count (t65 = -0.89, p = 0.38). The 95% limits of agreement for energy expenditure and step count were -0.98 to 0.95 kcal/kg/h and -7 to 7 step/min, respectively. Latin dance to salsa music elicits physiological responses representative of moderate to vigorous physical activity, and a wrist-worn accelerometer with simultaneous heart rate measurement constitutes a valid and reliable technique for the prediction of energy expenditure and step count during Latin dance.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(1):29-36.
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    ABSTRACT: The Dualistic Model of Passion defines passion as an intense desire or enthusiasm for a self-defining activity that people love, consider important, and devote significant amounts of time and energy to. The model proposes two distinct types of passion, harmonious (HP) and obsessive (OP). HP occurs when the activity is autonomously internalized into the individual's life and identity, while OP is a result of a controlled internalization of the activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and type of passion professional dancers have for dance in relation to their psychological well-being, specifically eating attitudes, self-esteem, and perfectionism. Participants were 92 professional dancers, aged 19 to 35 years (M = 27.03, SD = 3.84), and mostly from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada. Results revealed that HP positively predicted self-esteem (SE), while OP positively predicted self-evaluative perfectionism (SEP), conscientious perfectionism (CP), and disordered eating attitudes (EAT-26). Additionally, SEP was found to mediate the relationship between OP and EAT-26, suggesting that OP may lead to SEP, which could in turn motivate disordered eating. Overall, the results of this study have supported and extended previous research suggesting that the two types of passion can have divergent effects on aspects of psychological well-being. Findings indicate that HP should be encouraged and OP discouraged among dancers, for example, via autonomy supportive behaviors of teachers.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(1):37-44.
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    ABSTRACT: While studies have investigated the physical demands of dance in terms of cardiorespiratory fitness, there are no recent comparisons of cardiorespiratory response to exercise among professional dancers of different genres. Our purpose was to: 1. develop a cardiorespiratory profile of professional dancers; 2. investigate differences in peak and recovery heart rate (HR) between professional modern and ballet dancers using an accelerated 3-minute step test; 3. demonstrate the relationship between cardiorespiratory variables; and 4. investigate the effects of company and work variables on the dancers' cardiorespiratory profiles. We hypothesized greater cardiorespiratory fitness in modern dancers than in ballet dancers, due to the nature of their repertory. Furthermore, we hypothesized that company profiles would reflect differences in work variables. Two hundred and eleven dancers (mean age 24.6 ± 4.7) from nine companies (two modern and seven ballet) performed a 3-minute step test. Demographics, height, mass, blood pressure (BP), smoking history, and resting peak and recovery HR were recorded. Body mass index (BMI) and fitness category were calculated. Independent t-tests were used to compare differences in demographics and cardiorespiratory variables due to genre, MANOVA were conducted to compare differences due to company, and correlations were calculated to determine the relationships between cardiorespiratory variables (p Modern dancers demonstrated higher mass and BMI, lower BP, lower resting HR and HR recovery, and a higher percentage were categorized as "fit" compared to ballet dancers (p Document Type: Research Article DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12678/1089-313X.18.2.74 Affiliations: 1: ADAM Center, Department of Physical Therapy, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA; Physical Therapy Services, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, New York, New York, USA. shaw.bronner@gmail.com 2: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, New York, New York, USA 3: Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine Center, Palisades Medical Center, North Bergen, New Jersey, USA 4: Physical Therapy Services, Boston Ballet, Boston, Massachusetts, USA 5: Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy Services, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA 6: Body Dynamics, Inc., Arlington, Virginia, USA; Health and Wellness Services, The Washington Ballet and The Washington School of Ballet, Washington DC, USA 7: NovaCare Rehabilitation, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA 8: Texas Healthcare Bone and Joint Physical Therapy, and Medical Consultant at the Texas Ballet Theater, Fort Worth, Texas, USA 9: San Francisco Ballet, San Francisco, California, USA Publication date: June 1, 2014 More about this publication? Editorial Board Information for Authors Membership Information ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites $(document).ready(function() { var shortdescription = $(".originaldescription").text().replace(/\\&/g, '&').replace(/\\, '<').replace(/\\>/g, '>').replace(/\\t/g, ' ').replace(/\\n/g, ''); if (shortdescription.length > 350){ shortdescription = "" + shortdescription.substring(0,250) + "... more"; } $(".descriptionitem").prepend(shortdescription); $(".shortdescription a").click(function() { $(".shortdescription").hide(); $(".originaldescription").slideDown(); return false; }); }); Related content In this: publication By this: publisher In this Subject: Arts (General) , Medicine (General) , Therapeutics & Alternative Medicine By this author: Bronner, Shaw ; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi ; Lora, Jennifer Bailey ; Southwick, Heather ; Kulak, Michelina Cassella ; Gamboa, Jennifer ; Rooney, Megan ; Gilman, Greg ; Gibbs, Richard GA_googleFillSlot("Horizontal_banner_bottom");
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Hallux valgus is a common deformity of the forefoot. There is no doubt that some dancers develop hallux valgus, but the question remains as to whether dancers are at greater risk than the general population for developing this deformity. Review of the literature reveals on-going debate regarding risk factors for hallux valgus, which may include increasing age, female gender, genetic predisposition, constrictive shoe wear, first ray hypermobility, foot architecture, tight Achilles tendon, and first metatarsal length. There is insufficient evidence to demonstrate conclusively that dancing, specifically pointe work, increases the prevalence or severity of hallux valgus; more research is needed. Treatment of hallux valgus in dancers should be conservative, with delay of surgical correction until retirement if possible.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(2).
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    ABSTRACT: As the technical performance demands of dance increase, professional companies and pre-professional schools are implementing pre-season screenings that require an efficient, cost effective way to measure dancer aerobic fitness. The aim of this study was to assess an accelerated 3-minute step test (112 beats·min(-1)) by comparing it to the well-studied YMCA step test (96 beats·min(-1)) and a benchmark standard, an incremental treadmill test, using heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO2) as variables. Twenty-six professional and pre- professional dancers (age 20 ± 2.02 years) were fitted with a telemetric gas analysis system and HR monitor. They were tested in the following order: 96 step, 112 step, and treadmill test, with rest to return to baseline heart rate between each test. The step and treadmill tests were compared using Intra-class Correlation Coefficients [ICC (3, k)] calculated with analysis of variance (p < 0.05). To determine whether there was a relationship between peak and recovery HR (HRpeak, HRrecov) and VO2(VO2peak, VO2recov) variables, Pearson product moment correlations were used. Differences due to gender or group (pre- professionals versus professionals) were explored with MANOVAs for HRpeak, VO2peak, HRrecov, VO2recov, and fitness category. The 112 step test produced higher HRpeak and VO2peak values than the 96 step test, reflecting a greater workload (p < 0.001). For HRpeak, there were high correlations (r = 0.71) and for HRrecov, moderate correlations (r = 0.60) between the 112 step test and treadmill test. For VO2peak and VO2recov, there were moderate correlations between the 112 step test and treadmill test (r = 0.65 and 0.73). No differences between genders for VO2peak values were found for either step test, but males displayed lower HRpeak values for both step tests and higher VO2peak values during the treadmill test (p < 0.001). Recovery HR was lower in males for the 96 and 112 step tests (p < 0.05). This was reflected in higher fitness scores. There were no differences between groups in any of the variables when only females were compared. For the 112 step test, correlations between HRpeak and HRrecov were high (r = 0.85), and correlations between HRpeak and fitness category were very high (r = 0.98). It is concluded that the 112 step test provides an efficient, acceptable tool for testing dance populations, though further testing in larger groups of dancers representing a diverse range of genres and training levels is needed.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(1):12-21.
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    ABSTRACT: Visual conditions for a dancer vary greatly between theatrical performance environments and dance studios, and this variability may be detrimental to their dynamic balance performance, particularly under stage lighting. In order to maintain balance control, dancers reportedly rely heavily on visual input, yet those who rely more on proprioceptive strategies for balancing have been found to be more stable. The purpose of this study was to assess the capability of an eyes-closed, dance-specific training program to nurture in dancers proprioceptive mechanisms that may facilitate their dynamic balance control. Eighteen elite pre-professional ballet dancers were randomly assigned to either a control (eyes open) or experimental (eyes closed) group for the intervention. The balance abilities of all subjects were tested using five dance-specific variations of the Star Excursion Balance Test before and after a 4 week balance intervention. Reach distance and time to complete the tests were recorded separately as indirect measurements of dynamic balance. The intervention consisted of dance-specific, eyes-closed exercises integrated into the dancers' daily ballet class and designed progressively to challenge the dancers' balance. During the intervention period, the control group undertook the same exercise program with their eyes open. Results revealed significant improvements in time to complete the three "timed" balance tests, and distances reached significantly improved in one of the two "reach" balance tests. No significant improvements were observed in the control group for any variation of the tests. These results indicate that dancers can be trained to adopt proprioceptive strategies to maintain dynamic balance, which consequently improves their balance performance. Such findings could encourage use of eyes-closed training in daily dance classes due to its potential to improve dancers' balance control.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(1):3-11.
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    ABSTRACT: Sport-related concussion is a topic of increasing public and media attention; the medical literature on this topic is growing rapidly. However, to our knowledge no published papers have described concussion specifically in the dancer. This case series involved a retrospective chart review at a large teaching hospital over a 5.5-year period. Eleven dancers (10 female, 1 male) were identified who experienced concussions while in dance class, rehearsal, or performance: 2 in classical ballet, 2 in modern dance, 2 in acro dance, 1 in hip hop, 1 in musical theater, and 3 were unspecified. Dancers were between 12 and 20 years old at the time of presentation. Three concussions occurred during stunting, diving, or flipping. Three resulted from unintentional drops while partnering. Two followed slips and falls. Two were due to direct blows to the head, and one dancer developed symptoms after repeatedly whipping her head and neck in a choreographed movement. Time to presentation in the sports medicine clinic ranged from the day of injury to 3 months. Duration of symptoms ranged from less than 3 weeks to greater than 2 years at last documented follow-up appointment. It is concluded that dancers do suffer dance-related concussions that can result in severe symptoms, limitations in dance participation, and difficulty with activities of daily living. Future studies are needed to evaluate dancers' recognition of concussion symptoms and care-seeking behaviors. Additional work is also necessary to tailor existing guidelines for gradual, progressive, safe return to dance.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Revue productions are a combination of dancing and singing, musical and spoken sequences, and acrobatics, performed with or without a story line, and characterized by a versatility of dance styles and a high number of performances (over 250 in a 10-month season). The aim of this quantitative single cohort study is to evaluate work-related traumatic injuries in this dance genre. Data were obtained from work accident reports of the German Social Accident Insurance Institution for the public sector in Berlin (UKB) involving 440 revue dancers (183 males and 257 females). Analysis was conducted with Excel 2007 and PASW Statistics 18. One out of three female dancers and one out of two male dancers sustained an acute injury in the course of a theatrical season (0.22 injuries per 1,000 hours). The incidence rate was 0.44 for males and 0.31 for females, with the lower extremity as the most commonly injured body region, followed by the spine. Of all occupational accidents, 75.1% happened on stage, with 69% during performances. The dance partner and dance floor were the most common exogenous factors resulting in a traumatic injury. Of all traumatic injuries, 81.7% occurred in the first 3 hours after starting work. Gender specific differences could be observed. Due to the limited availability of comparable studies of other forms of professional dance, in this study revue dance is largely considered as an independent genre.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(1):22-8.
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to investigate the effects of ballet-specific vestibular stimulation and fatigue on static postural control in ballet dancers and to establish whether these effects differ across varying levels of ballet training. Dancers were divided into three groups: professional, pre-professional, and recreational. Static postural control of 23 dancers was measured on a force platform at baseline and then immediately, 30 seconds, and 60 seconds after vestibular stimulation (pirouettes) and induction of fatigue (repetitive jumps). The professional dancers' balance was unaffected by both the vestibular stimulation and the fatigue task. The pre-professional and recreational dancers' static sway increased following both perturbations. It is concluded that professional dancers are able to compensate for vestibular and fatiguing perturbations due to a higher level of skill-specific motor training.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(2).
  • Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(2).
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    ABSTRACT: We report a case of a 13-year-old female dancer with spinous process apophysitis following repetitive microtrauma during end-range hyperextension movements. Following appropriate rest and limitation of hyperextension, she was able to return to her previous level of training. It is important to recognize that numerous diagnostic possibilities arise when presented with a young dancer with back pain. The intention of this case report is to compare and contrast the pertinent clinical and radiologic findings of spinous process apophysitis and its more common and debilitating mimic, spondylolysis. The correct diagnosis is paramount in cases of this sort due to the variable treatment requirements of each disorder.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2013; 17(4):170-4.
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    ABSTRACT: Posterior ankle pain is a common complaint in dancers. There are multiple structures in the posterior ankle that have the potential to be the source of pain. The objective of this article is to review several of the most common causes of posterior ankle pain: peroneal tendon subluxation, posterior impingement syndrome secondary to a painful os trigonum, posterior talus osteochondritis dissecans, flexor hallucis longus tendinopathy, and posterior tibial tendinopathy. For dancers, we offer typical clinical presentations of these disorders to increase awareness and provide guidance regarding when to seek professional medical attention. For medical personnel who are responsible for optimizing dancers' health and training, we include a discussion of pertinent physical exam findings, diagnostic imaging options, non-operative and operative management, as well as surgical suggestions and postoperative rehabilitation guidelines.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2013; 17(2):79-83.
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the evolution of Irish dance to professional status in recent decades, only scant investigation of musculoskeletal pain and injury among professional Irish dancers (PIDs) has been undertaken. This study investigated the rate of injury and associated factors among 178 PIDs, using an online questionnaire. One hundred and thirty-seven PIDs (76.7%) reported a previous injury, with the foot (67.9%) and ankle (60.6%) most commonly affected. A mean career rate of 2.25 injuries per dancer was computed. The majority of injuries were minor in nature, and almost half occurred midway through a tour. Sixty subjects (33.7%) reported that they often or always danced in pain. The main contributory factors to injury were accidents, fatigue or overwork, repetitive movements, and unsafe stages. Warm-up (98.8%) and cool-down (84.3%) were almost universally practised, with cross-training engaged in by 124 PIDs (74.7%). Popular treatments used to prevent and manage injuries were massage (N = 137, or 83.0% of PIDs), stretching (N = 117, or 70.1%) and physiotherapy (N = 105, or 62.9%). There was a moderate level of psychological distress among the participants, with "interpersonal difficulties" and "tension with people" the main problems cited. PIDs who were older (p = 0.008) and more experienced (p = 0.002) reported missing a greater number of performances due to injury. There were no other significant relationships between injury and factors, including gender, frequency of dancing in pain, use of warm-up, cool-down, or cross-training. Further prospective studies of PIDs should consider both physical and biopsychosocial elements to generate an appropriate screening process to predict those at risk of injury.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2013; 17(4):150-8.

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