Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science (J Dance Med Sci )

Publisher: International Association for Dance Medicine & Science

Description

Each issue focuses on bringing you the current results of clinical and experimental research. The aim of the Journal of Dance Medicine & Science is to provide you with one source for up-to-date information. Featured articles are drawn from the fields of:

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  • Website
    Journal of Dance Medicine and Science website
  • Other titles
    Journal of dance medicine & science (Online), Dance medicine & science, Journal of dance medicine and science
  • ISSN
    1089-313X
  • OCLC
    61314134
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Previous investigations have established that dancers suffer a large number of injuries to the lower leg, foot, and ankle, with a portion of these being significant time loss injuries or in some cases career ending. Lateral ankle sprain is a common injury in dancers and can often lead to recurrent instability and repetitive injuries. Research in other active populations has linked ankle sprains to the development of chronic ankle instability (CAI). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of CAI and related symptoms of ankle sprain in a student dance population. Individuals were included if they were currently a modern or ballet dance major at the investigators' university (exclusion criterion: a history of fracture or surgery in the lower extremities). A self-reported demographic questionnaire and the Identification of Functional Ankle Instability survey were used to identify the presence and characteristics of CAI. A total of 83 questionnaires were collected, and after exclusions, 77 participants remained: 43 modern dancers and 34 ballet dancers (10 males and 67 females, mean age 19.61 ± 2.53 years, mean dance experience 13.61 ± 3.16 years). Of all dancers surveyed, 41 (53.2%) had CAI, and of those 24 (58.5%) were modern dancers, and 17 (41.5%) were ballet dancers. When looking only at those dancers who had a previous lateral ankle sprain, 75.9% were identified as having CAI. Chronic Ankle Instability can create long-term problems for anyone but especially female dancers, who place extreme stress on their feet and ankles from being en pointe or demi-pointe. It is important to educate dancers, instructors, and medical staff of the importance of recognizing CAI and seeking medical care for ankle sprains and their residual symptoms.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 12/2014; 18(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Dancers are exposed to many landings from jumps during class and performance, and repetitive loading has been linked with an increased risk of injury. Little is known about the effect of different dance shoe types on jump landings, and with so many dance shoe designs available to choose from, a thorough exploration is warranted. Dance technique dictates that jump landings be “rolled through the foot,” with a toe strike followed by controlled lowering of the ball of the foot and heel. For this study, 3D motion analysis was used to capture the movement of 16 female dancers performing sautés in second position. Lower limb joint kinematics were examined during the landings, both barefoot and in different jazz shoe designs. The results showed that all dancers executed the technique of “rolling through the foot.” All jazz shoe designs increased knee and ankle sagittal ROM (p Document Type: Research Article DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12678/1089-313X.18.4.149 Affiliations: 1: Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, 75 East St, Lidcombe, NSW 2141, Australia;, Email: alycia.fongyan@sydney.edu.au 2: Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Australia Publication date: December 1, 2014 More about this publication? Editorial Board Information for Authors Membership Information ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites $(document).ready(function() { var shortdescription = $(".originaldescription").text().replace(/\\&/g, '&').replace(/\\, '<').replace(/\\>/g, '>').replace(/\\t/g, ' ').replace(/\\n/g, ''); if (shortdescription.length > 350){ shortdescription = "" + shortdescription.substring(0,250) + "... more"; } $(".descriptionitem").prepend(shortdescription); $(".shortdescription a").click(function() { $(".shortdescription").hide(); $(".originaldescription").slideDown(); return false; }); }); Related content In this: publication By this: publisher In this Subject: Arts (General) , Medicine (General) , Therapeutics & Alternative Medicine By this author: Yan, Alycia Fong ; Hiller, Claire ; Sinclair, Peter J. ; Smith, Richard M. GA_googleFillSlot("Horizontal_banner_bottom");
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A high degree of turnout is desired by many dancers. Turnout enables the efficient transfer of weight, allows for greater extension and control, and reduces injury risk when used correctly. The purpose of this study was to determine whether participation in a targeted training program beyond technique classes would improve university dancers' ability to use a greater proportion of the turnout their bodies could accommodate without compensation. Six dancers' ability to produce turnout without distorting their alignment was assessed daily, and a multiple baseline experimental design was used to measure the effects of turnout training. Results showed an average increase of 14° in Total Active Turnout (TAT) for all six dancers. In addition, a dance teacher with special experience in the dance sciences rated all of the dancers as showing better control of turnout while performing an adagio phrase following training than before training. These findings suggest that targeted training may offer a useful approach to helping dancers improve skills that enhance performance and promote good health.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 12/2014; 18(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium associated with various infectious diseases. Not only has the bacterium been detected in sports environments, the reported incidences of S. aureus infections have steadily increased in athletic teams. However, in spite of similarities between sports and dance facilities, to our knowledge no previous study has examined the presence of this bacterium in the dance environment. We hypothesized that S. aureus would be present in a university's dance studios, and that it would be extant in higher concentrations inside versus outside the studios. Using common microbiological culturing methods, samples were gathered from floors and barres in three studios of a single university, as well as from outside floors and railings near the studios and a conference room used by dancers. Confirming our hypothesis, we detected S. aureus in every dance studio sample (0.03 to 0.38 cfu/cm 2 ). Supporting our second hypothesis, we found that average S. aureus concentrations from the three studios were significantly higher compared to both outside and conference room samples (P ≤ 0.001). The latter two locations did not yield any S. aureus concentrations. Control samples developed as expected. The results of this study suggest that S. aureus bacteria are common on the flooring and barres of university dance studios, with the bacterial concentrations possibly dependent on the hours of usage of these surfaces. Whether the presence of S. aureus in dance studios presents a health risk to dancers should be studied further.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 09/2014; 18(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Summer dance intensive programs are an integral part of many serious dancers' training. The risk and rate of injury in this setting have not been well studied. The goal of this data analysis is to detail the epidemiology of dance injuries reported during a summer dance intensive over a consecutive 3 year period. Data collection included information regarding the number of evaluation and treatment sessions conducted at the program's walk-in clinic, body regions injured, whether the injuries were recurrences of pre-existing conditions or newly sustained during the intensive, and at what point in the program they were recorded. Overall, more of the clinic's clientele presented with multiple injuries than with single discrete injuries. The anatomic distribution of injuries appears to be consistent with previously reported data, with the four most commonly injured body regions being ankle, pelvis and hip, knee, and lumbar spine. Injuries sustained during the intensive (IR) occurred at a 2:1 ratio to pre-intensive injuries (PR). Relative to those with PR injuries, dancers with IR injuries were far more likely to present during the first half of the program. This study is a first step toward filling a gap in the literature by describing injury incidence in a specific population within the dance community.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 09/2014; 18(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Low back pain (LBP) is often cited as a common condition at all levels of dance. Evidence suggests that reduced endurance of the trunk muscles can predispose an individual to LBP. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in trunk muscle endurance in a sample of tertiary level dance students with and without LBP. Seventeen full-time female dance students were divided into two groups: dance students with LBP (N = 11), and without LBP (N = 6). All participants provided informed consent, and the study was approved by an institutional ethics review board. Participants performed four isometric tests that assess trunk muscle endurance: the right and left side plank, double straight leg raise (DSLR), and the Sorensen test. A modified version of the Osaka City University test was used to assess the presence of LBP. A significant difference (p Document Type: Research Article DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12678/1089-313X.18.2.62 Affiliations: 1: Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, London, UK. ctvswain@gmail.com 2: Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, London, UK Publication date: June 1, 2014 More about this publication? Editorial Board Information for Authors Membership Information ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites $(document).ready(function() { var shortdescription = $(".originaldescription").text().replace(/\\&/g, '&').replace(/\\, '<').replace(/\\>/g, '>').replace(/\\t/g, ' ').replace(/\\n/g, ''); if (shortdescription.length > 350){ shortdescription = "" + shortdescription.substring(0,250) + "... more"; } $(".descriptionitem").prepend(shortdescription); $(".shortdescription a").click(function() { $(".shortdescription").hide(); $(".originaldescription").slideDown(); return false; }); }); Related content In this: publication By this: publisher In this Subject: Arts (General) , Medicine (General) , Therapeutics & Alternative Medicine By this author: Swain, Christopher ; Redding, Emma GA_googleFillSlot("Horizontal_banner_bottom");
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 06/2014; 18(2).
  • Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 03/2014; 18(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to value calibrate, cross-validate, and determine the reliability of a combined triaxial accelerometry and heart rate telemetry technique for characterizing the physiological and physical activity parameters of Latin dance. Twenty-two non-professional adult Latin dancers attended two laboratory-based dance trials each. After familiarization and a standardized warm-up, a multi-stage (3 x 5-minute) incremental (based on song tempo) Afro-Cuban salsa choreography was performed while following a video displayed on a projection screen. Data were collected with a portable indirect calorimeter, a heart rate telemeter, and wrist-, hip-, and ankle-mounted ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers. Prediction equations for energy expenditure and step count were value calibrated using forced entry multiple regression and cross-validated using a delete-one jackknife approach with additional Bland-Altman analysis. The average dance intensity reached 6.09 ± 0.96 kcal/kg/h and demanded 45.9 ± 11.3% of the heart rate reserve. Predictive ability of the derived models was satisfactory, where R(2) = 0.80; SEE = 0.44 kcal/kg/h and R(2) = 0.74; SEE = 3 step/min for energy expenditure and step count, respectively. Dependent t-tests indicated no differences between predicted and measured values for both energy expenditure (t65 = -0.25, p = 0.80) and step count (t65 = -0.89, p = 0.38). The 95% limits of agreement for energy expenditure and step count were -0.98 to 0.95 kcal/kg/h and -7 to 7 step/min, respectively. Latin dance to salsa music elicits physiological responses representative of moderate to vigorous physical activity, and a wrist-worn accelerometer with simultaneous heart rate measurement constitutes a valid and reliable technique for the prediction of energy expenditure and step count during Latin dance.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(1):29-36.
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to investigate the effects of ballet-specific vestibular stimulation and fatigue on static postural control in ballet dancers and to establish whether these effects differ across varying levels of ballet training. Dancers were divided into three groups: professional, pre-professional, and recreational. Static postural control of 23 dancers was measured on a force platform at baseline and then immediately, 30 seconds, and 60 seconds after vestibular stimulation (pirouettes) and induction of fatigue (repetitive jumps). The professional dancers' balance was unaffected by both the vestibular stimulation and the fatigue task. The pre-professional and recreational dancers' static sway increased following both perturbations. It is concluded that professional dancers are able to compensate for vestibular and fatiguing perturbations due to a higher level of skill-specific motor training.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The Dualistic Model of Passion defines passion as an intense desire or enthusiasm for a self-defining activity that people love, consider important, and devote significant amounts of time and energy to. The model proposes two distinct types of passion, harmonious (HP) and obsessive (OP). HP occurs when the activity is autonomously internalized into the individual's life and identity, while OP is a result of a controlled internalization of the activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and type of passion professional dancers have for dance in relation to their psychological well-being, specifically eating attitudes, self-esteem, and perfectionism. Participants were 92 professional dancers, aged 19 to 35 years (M = 27.03, SD = 3.84), and mostly from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada. Results revealed that HP positively predicted self-esteem (SE), while OP positively predicted self-evaluative perfectionism (SEP), conscientious perfectionism (CP), and disordered eating attitudes (EAT-26). Additionally, SEP was found to mediate the relationship between OP and EAT-26, suggesting that OP may lead to SEP, which could in turn motivate disordered eating. Overall, the results of this study have supported and extended previous research suggesting that the two types of passion can have divergent effects on aspects of psychological well-being. Findings indicate that HP should be encouraged and OP discouraged among dancers, for example, via autonomy supportive behaviors of teachers.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(1):37-44.
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    ABSTRACT: Sport-related concussion is a topic of increasing public and media attention; the medical literature on this topic is growing rapidly. However, to our knowledge no published papers have described concussion specifically in the dancer. This case series involved a retrospective chart review at a large teaching hospital over a 5.5-year period. Eleven dancers (10 female, 1 male) were identified who experienced concussions while in dance class, rehearsal, or performance: 2 in classical ballet, 2 in modern dance, 2 in acro dance, 1 in hip hop, 1 in musical theater, and 3 were unspecified. Dancers were between 12 and 20 years old at the time of presentation. Three concussions occurred during stunting, diving, or flipping. Three resulted from unintentional drops while partnering. Two followed slips and falls. Two were due to direct blows to the head, and one dancer developed symptoms after repeatedly whipping her head and neck in a choreographed movement. Time to presentation in the sports medicine clinic ranged from the day of injury to 3 months. Duration of symptoms ranged from less than 3 weeks to greater than 2 years at last documented follow-up appointment. It is concluded that dancers do suffer dance-related concussions that can result in severe symptoms, limitations in dance participation, and difficulty with activities of daily living. Future studies are needed to evaluate dancers' recognition of concussion symptoms and care-seeking behaviors. Additional work is also necessary to tailor existing guidelines for gradual, progressive, safe return to dance.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Visual conditions for a dancer vary greatly between theatrical performance environments and dance studios, and this variability may be detrimental to their dynamic balance performance, particularly under stage lighting. In order to maintain balance control, dancers reportedly rely heavily on visual input, yet those who rely more on proprioceptive strategies for balancing have been found to be more stable. The purpose of this study was to assess the capability of an eyes-closed, dance-specific training program to nurture in dancers proprioceptive mechanisms that may facilitate their dynamic balance control. Eighteen elite pre-professional ballet dancers were randomly assigned to either a control (eyes open) or experimental (eyes closed) group for the intervention. The balance abilities of all subjects were tested using five dance-specific variations of the Star Excursion Balance Test before and after a 4 week balance intervention. Reach distance and time to complete the tests were recorded separately as indirect measurements of dynamic balance. The intervention consisted of dance-specific, eyes-closed exercises integrated into the dancers' daily ballet class and designed progressively to challenge the dancers' balance. During the intervention period, the control group undertook the same exercise program with their eyes open. Results revealed significant improvements in time to complete the three "timed" balance tests, and distances reached significantly improved in one of the two "reach" balance tests. No significant improvements were observed in the control group for any variation of the tests. These results indicate that dancers can be trained to adopt proprioceptive strategies to maintain dynamic balance, which consequently improves their balance performance. Such findings could encourage use of eyes-closed training in daily dance classes due to its potential to improve dancers' balance control.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(1):3-11.
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    ABSTRACT: Revue productions are a combination of dancing and singing, musical and spoken sequences, and acrobatics, performed with or without a story line, and characterized by a versatility of dance styles and a high number of performances (over 250 in a 10-month season). The aim of this quantitative single cohort study is to evaluate work-related traumatic injuries in this dance genre. Data were obtained from work accident reports of the German Social Accident Insurance Institution for the public sector in Berlin (UKB) involving 440 revue dancers (183 males and 257 females). Analysis was conducted with Excel 2007 and PASW Statistics 18. One out of three female dancers and one out of two male dancers sustained an acute injury in the course of a theatrical season (0.22 injuries per 1,000 hours). The incidence rate was 0.44 for males and 0.31 for females, with the lower extremity as the most commonly injured body region, followed by the spine. Of all occupational accidents, 75.1% happened on stage, with 69% during performances. The dance partner and dance floor were the most common exogenous factors resulting in a traumatic injury. Of all traumatic injuries, 81.7% occurred in the first 3 hours after starting work. Gender specific differences could be observed. Due to the limited availability of comparable studies of other forms of professional dance, in this study revue dance is largely considered as an independent genre.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(1):22-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Hallux valgus is a common deformity of the forefoot. There is no doubt that some dancers develop hallux valgus, but the question remains as to whether dancers are at greater risk than the general population for developing this deformity. Review of the literature reveals on-going debate regarding risk factors for hallux valgus, which may include increasing age, female gender, genetic predisposition, constrictive shoe wear, first ray hypermobility, foot architecture, tight Achilles tendon, and first metatarsal length. There is insufficient evidence to demonstrate conclusively that dancing, specifically pointe work, increases the prevalence or severity of hallux valgus; more research is needed. Treatment of hallux valgus in dancers should be conservative, with delay of surgical correction until retirement if possible.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 01/2014; 18(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Irish dance is growing in popularity and competitiveness; however, very little research has focused specifically on this genre of dance. The purpose of this study was to analyze the types of dance injuries incurred by Irish dancers. A chart review was performed to identify all injuries associated with Irish dance seen in the sports medicine or orthopaedic clinics at the investigators' hospital over an 11-year period. "Injury" was defined as any dance-related pain or disorder that led to evaluation in the clinics. Survey data were also collected from study participants. Ultimately, 255 patients from over 30 different schools of dance were seen with injuries directly related (726 clinic visits) or partially related (199 visits) to Irish dance. Participants ranged in age from 4 to 47, with 95% (243/255) under the age of 19. These 255 patients received 437 diagnoses. Almost 80% of the injuries (348/437) were attributable to overuse, and 20.4% were acute and traumatic injuries (89/437). Ninety-five percent (95.9%) of injuries involved the hip or lower extremity. The most common sites were the foot (33.2%), ankle (22.7%), knee (19.7%), and hip (14.4%). Typical diagnoses were tendon injury (13.3%), apophysitis (11.4%), patellofemoral pain and instability (10.8%), stress injury (10.1%), and muscle injury (7.8%). The majority of traumatic injuries were seen in clinic within 3 weeks, but less than a quarter of overuse injuries were seen that quickly. The most common treatment, prescribed to 84.3% of patients, was physical therapy and home exercises, and the majority of dancers (64.3%) were able to return to full dance activity after injury.
    Journal of dance medicine & science: official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science 12/2013; 17(4):159-64.