Bioremediation Journal

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

Bioremediation Journal is a peer-reviewed, quarterly journal that publishes original laboratory and field research in bioremediation, the use of biological and supporting physical treatments to treat contaminated soil and groundwater. The journal provides rapid dissemination of new information on emerging and maturing bioremediation technologies and integrates scientific research and engineering practices.

  • Impact factor
    0.40
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.12
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Bioremediation Journal website
  • Other titles
    Bioremediation journal
  • ISSN
    1088-9868
  • OCLC
    34795756
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • Bioremediation Journal 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cr(VI) is a toxic environmental pollutant. To determine the potential role of microbes towards chromate bioremediation, two bacterial strains, E1 and E4, that could tolerate Cr(VI) at levels up to 2250 μg ml−1 were isolated from the soil of a tannery. They were identified as Exiguobacterium sp. To estimate the removal of Cr(VI) using immobilized bacterial cells, 2% sodium alginate and 2.5% agar were used as immobilizing matrices. In the case of sodium alginate, 89% and 93% of Cr(VI) removal by E1 and E4, respectively, were observed. When agar beads were used as an immobilizing matrix, removal was recorded as 39% and 48% for E1 and E4, respectively. Removal of Cr(VI) was also estimated in sterile and nonsterile tannery effluent. More Cr(VI) removal was noted in the nonsterile effluent than in the sterile effluent. The maximum uptake of Cr(VI) of bound cells of E1 and E4 was found to be 17.54 and 20.04 μg ml−1, respectively. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of cells of E4 with Cr(VI), without Cr(VI), and immobilized cells depicted several absorption peaks, mainly for P‐OH group, C‐H bending, C‐O bond, and amide II groups, reflecting the complex nature of the bacterial cells and the contribution of these functional groups to the Cr(VI) binding process.
    Bioremediation Journal 10/2014; 18(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The pore structure and pore size distribution (PSD) in the clayey till matrix from three Danish field sites were investigated by image analysis to assess the matrix migration of dechlorinating bacteria in clayey till. Clayey till samples had a wide range of pore sizes, with diameters of 0.1–100 μm, and two typical peaks of pore sizes were observed in all clayey till samples. A large area fraction of the individual pores centered around 2 μm in diameter, and another fraction centered around 20 μm. In general, the typical macropore sizes (1 μm D Keywords: backscatter scanning electron microscopy; dechlorinating bacteria; fracture aperture; fractured clayey till; pore size distribution (PSD) Document Type: Research Article DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10889868.2014.939133 Affiliations: 1: Key Laboratory of Groundwater Resources and Environment, Ministry of Education, Jilin University, Changchun, China 2: CERE, Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark 3: Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark Publication date: October 2, 2014 $(document).ready(function() { var shortdescription = $(".originaldescription").text().replace(/\\&/g, '&').replace(/\\, '<').replace(/\\>/g, '>').replace(/\\t/g, ' ').replace(/\\n/g, ''); if (shortdescription.length > 350){ shortdescription = "" + shortdescription.substring(0,250) + "... more"; } $(".descriptionitem").prepend(shortdescription); $(".shortdescription a").click(function() { $(".shortdescription").hide(); $(".originaldescription").slideDown(); return false; }); }); Related content In this: publication By this: publisher By this author: Lu, Cong ; Broholm, Mette M. ; Fabricius, Ida L. ; Bjerg, Poul L. GA_googleFillSlot("Horizontal_banner_bottom");
    Bioremediation Journal 10/2014; 18(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Synthetic dyes are extensively used in textile dyeing, paper printing, color photography, and the pharmaceutical, food, cosmetic, and leather industries. Most synthetic dyes are toxic and highly resistant to removal due to their complex chemical structures. There is a need for investigation of the biological treatment of synthetic dyes at a low cost and in the shortest possible time; synthetic dyes are used especially in the dye and textile industries and are an important polluting agent in the wastewater dumped into the environment by these industries. White rot fungus contains a variety of extracellular enzymes, and these enzymes are used for biological degradation of organic matter. The aim of the present work is to evaluate removal of the textile dye Turquoise Blue HFG by Coprinus plicatilis. Coprinus plicatilis was able to enzymatically decolorize 100% of the dye (dye concentration 10.0 and 25.0 mg L−1). Ultraviolet–visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometric analyses, before and after decolorization, suggest that decolorization was due to biodegradation. There was an attempt to identify metabolites with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) at the end of the decolorization process. These results indicate that the samples did not include any detectable metabolite. Therefore, this fungus can be used as an economical and eco-friendly tool to minimize the pollution by industries to a significant extent.
    Bioremediation Journal 10/2014; 18(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lead (Pb) contamination in soils is a serious concern because it can be taken up by crops and then transferred through the food chain, posing a potential risk to human health. Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) are important crop species known to accumulate heavy metals in their tissues. This study aimed at understanding the transport and accumulation of Pb in these two species and the risk associated with consumption of these foods, which would help us in mitigating accumulation of Pb in edible tissues. The plants were grown at different Pb concentrations for the entire life cycle, and the partitioning of the metal to different tissues was examined. The results showed that plant species differ widely in their ability to transport and accumulate Pb in different tissues. In B. juncea, there was significant accumulation of Pb in both siliques and seeds, whereas most of the Pb in wheat was concentrated in the vegetative tissues and less to the flag leaf and reproductive tissues. In both species, although seed Pb concentrations exceeded acceptable limits, dietary intake did not exceed acceptable limits in most treatments, indicating that more studies on Pb transport and redistribution in crop species is necessary.
    Bioremediation Journal 10/2014; 18(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A laboratory-scale study was conducted in a 20.0-L sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to explore the feasibility of simultaneous removal of organic carbon and nitrogen from abattoir wastewater. The reactor was operated under three different combinations of aerobic-anoxic sequence, viz., (4+4), (5+3), and (5+4) h of total react period, with influent soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and ammonia nitrogen (NH4+-N) level of 2200 ± 50 and 125 ± 5 mg L−1, respectively. In (5+4) h cycle, a maximum 90.27% of ammonia reduction corresponding to initial NH4+-N value of 122.25 mg L−1 and 91.36% of organic carbon removal corresponding to initial SCOD value of 2215.25 mg L−1 have been achieved, respectively. The biokinetic parameters such as yield coefficient (Y), endogenous decay constant (k d), and half-velocity constant (k s) were also determined to improve the design and operation of package effluent treatment plants comprising SBR units. The specific denitrification rate (q DN) during anoxic condition was estimated as 6.135 mg N/g mixed liquor volatile suspended solid (MLVSS)·h on 4-h average contact period. The value of Y, k d and k s for carbon oxidation and nitrification were found to be in the range of 0.6225–0.6952 mg VSS/mg SCOD, 0.0481–0.0588 day−1, and 306.56–320.51 mg L−1, and 0.2461–0.2541 mg VSS/mg NH4+-N, 0.0324–0.0565 day−1, and 38.28–50.08 mg L−1, respectively, for different combinations of react periods.
    Bioremediation Journal 10/2014; 18(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is the first report on optimization of process variables for simultaneous bioremediation of PCP and Cr6+ employing traditional and response surface methodology (RSM). In a one-factor-at-a-time approach, the effect of PCP levels exhibited maximum bacterial growth, Cr6+ (82%) and PCP (91.5%) removal at initial 100 mg PCP l-1 with simultaneous presence of 200 mg Cr6+ l-1 within a 36 h incubation. However, at varied Cr6+ concentrations, maximum growth, Cr6+ (97%) and higher PCP (59%) removal were achieved at 50 mg Cr6+ l-1 with simultaneous presence of 500 mg PCP l-1 within a 36 h incubation. The Box-Behnken design suggested 100% Cr6+ and 95% PCP remediation at 36 h under optimum conditions of 75 mg PCP and 160 mg Cr6+ l-1, pH 7.0 and 35°C; Cr6+ removal further enhanced to 97% in bioreactor trial. FT-IR analysis revealed the likely involvement of hydroxyl, amide, and phosphate groups in Cr3+ binding. SEM-EDS showed biosorption of reduced chromium on bacterial cell surface. This isolate can be employed for eco-friendly and effective in situ bioremediation of Cr6+ and PCP simultaneously.
    Bioremediation Journal 09/2014; 18(4):328-344.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT The marine environment is the most dynamic and most variable among the natural environments present on the globe due to its continuously changing patterns of salinity, sea surface temperature, pH, and pressure. Thus, bacteria inhabiting this environment possess the inbuilt mechanisms of adaptation necessary in such fluctuating environmental conditions, and the harboring of heavy metal–resistant genes adds to their efficiency with regard to metal remediation compared with their terrestrial counterparts. Two highly mercury-resistant isolates, one from the marine environment and another from steel industry waste, were identified as Bacillus thuringiensis PW-05 and Bacillus sp. SD-43, respectively, by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. When various characters of these two isolates, e.g., biochemical, morphological, antibiotic resistance, and tolerance to other heavy metals, were analyzed, they were found to share common features. However, the marine Bacillus isolate (PW-05) was found to be more capable than its terrestrial counterpart in terms of mercury volatilization capability, i.e., 94.72% in the case of PW-05 and 60.06% in the case of SD-43. Hence, marine bacteria can be used more efficiently than their terrestrial counterparts for enhanced bioremediation of mercury in contaminated envi-ronments.
    Bioremediation Journal 07/2014; 18(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A pure strain of Microbacterium lacticum DJ-1 capable of anaer-obic biodegradation of ethylbenzene was isolated from soil contaminated with gasoline. Growth of the strain and biodegradation of ethylbenzene in batch cultures led to stoichiometric reduction of nitrate. M. lacticum DJ-1 could degrade 100 mg L−1 of ethylbenzene completely, with a maximum degradation rate of 15.02 ± 1.14 mg L−1 day−1. Increasing the initial concentration of ethy-lbenzene resulted in decreased degradative ability. The cell-specific growth rates on ethylbenzene conformed to the Haldane–Andrew model in the substrate level range of 10–150 mg L−1. Kinetic parameters were determined by nonlinear regression on specific growth rates and various initial substrate concentrat-ions, and the values of the maximum specific growth rate, half saturation constant, and inhibition constant were 0.71 day−1, 34.3 mg L−1, and 183.5 mg L−1, respectively. This is the first report of ethylbenzene biodegradation by a bacterium of Microbacterium lacticum under nitrate-reducing conditions.
    Bioremediation Journal 07/2014; 18(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An aerobic mixed culture collected in the form of activated sludge was enriched for Cr(VI) reduction. An indigenous microorganism was isolated from the enriched aerobic mixed culture and identified as Pseudomonas taiwanensis. Bioremediation studies were carried out for treating Cr(VI)-contaminated wastewater using the indigenous microorganism. The kinetic studies were carried out for initial Cr(VI) concentrations ranging from 20 to 200 mg L−1. The maximum consumption of Cr(VI) obtained was 108.3 mg L−1 for an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 150 mg L−1 at a solution pH of 7.0. The effect of nutrient dosage and pH were studied to get their optimum values. The same isolated bacterial strain was also used to treat Cr(VI)-contaminated industrial wastewater collected from a local plating industry. Various growth kinetic models, such as Monod, Powell, Haldane, Luong, and Edward models, were fitted with the obtained experimental data. The obtained results for different growth kinetic models indicate that the growth kinetics of Pseudomonas taiwanensis for bioremediation of Cr(VI) can be better understood by the Luong model (R 2 = .913). The rate kinetic analysis was performed using zero-order and three-half-order kinetic models. The three-half-order kinetic model was found to be suitable for the present bioremediation study.
    Bioremediation Journal 07/2014; 18(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Imidacloprid (IMI), a potent insecticide, belongs to the neonicotinoid family and is of great concern due to the fact that its persistence in the soil is a threat to both plants and vertebrates. The present study was aimed at the isolation and characterization of a bacterial strain from paddy field soil at Punjab (India), which has a history of 9–10 years of imidacloprid contamination. Among the various isolates, a soil bacterium was selected and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Enterobacter sp. strain ATA1. It grew well in pH ranging from 6.0 to 7.0 at 37°C, and it was found to be a competent bacterium for the degradation of IMI. The presence of glucose in minimal salt medium (MMG; 0.1% w/v) as compared with any other co-substrate provokes the dissipation of IMI as a co-metabolite. Initially, incubation of IMI for 72 h in the MMG resulted in 30–40% degradation; thereafter, no significant change in its amount was found until 15 days of incubation, which explains the disappearance of any viable cells in the medium. Among the various identified metabolites, imidacloprid urea (m/z = 212) and imidacloprid guanidine (m/z = 211) were found to be the end products of IMI degradation, whereas others remained unidentified (m/z = 99 and m/z = 119).
    Bioremediation Journal 07/2014; 18(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study is aimed at the naphthalene degradation with and without biosurfactant produced from Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from oil-contaminated soil. The present study was carried out to isolate the bacterial strains for the naphthalene degradation and also for biosurfactant production. The isolated strains were screened for their ability to degrade the naphthalene by the methods of optimum growth rate test and for the production of biosurfactants by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, blood agar medium, and thin-layer chromatography. The present study also focused on the effect of biosurfactant for the degradation of naphthalene by isolate-1. Two bacterial strains were isolated and screened, one for biodegradation and another for biosurfactant production. The second organism was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by 16S rRNA analysis. The purified biosurfactant reduces the surface tension of water and also forms stable emulsification with hexadecane and kerosene. The end product of naphthalene degradation was estimated as salicylic acid equivalent by spectrophotometric method. The results demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa has the potential to produce biosurfactant, which enhances the biodegradation of naphthalene. The study reflects the potential use of biosurfactants for an effective bioremediation in the management of contaminated soils.
    Bioremediation Journal 07/2014; 18(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The adsorption potential of a nonliving alga Nostoc comminutum for the removal of hazardous dyes from aqueous solutions was assessed. The algal biomass in its native form exhibited the highest dye removal efficiency at a pH of 1 and at a contact time of 50 min. The effect of various chemical pretreatments was studied in order to assess the role of surface chemistry and the underlying mechanism. Combined with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies, it was concluded that the carboxylic and amine groups played a dominant role in the dye binding process. pH studies further revealed that besides the electrostatic mechanism, other physical interactions might be operative, which is also revealed from the Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm model. Kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption process followed the second-order kinetics and particle diffusion mechanisms were operative. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the adsorption of two dyes onto the algal biomass was feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic under the studied conditions. Microwave irradiation was proposed as a green method for the regeneration and reuse of the biomass. A 16% loss in the regeneration efficiency of the biosorbent was observed, which reveals its stability and reuse potential. Column experiments with real textile wastewater established the practicality of the developed system. Finally, a comparative study revealed the efficacy of the biosorbent with other previously reported biosorbents for dye removal.
    Bioremediation Journal 07/2014; 18(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT The present study endeavors to isolate a nickel (Ni)-resistant bacterial strain from an industrial waste–contaminated soil sample and to characterize the strain with a view to identify it and to assess its ability to remove Ni from the medium or detoxify it. The final objective is to use the strain as an agent to bioremediate Ni contamination. As an outcome, a Ni-resistant bacterial strain (KUNi1) had been isolated from such a soil that could tolerate a maximum of 7.5 and 10 mM Ni concentrations, depending on the type of medium used. The strain also showed multimetal resistance. It was found to be resistant to zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), cobalt (Co), and cadmium (Cd). However, the degree of resistance to the individual metal was variable, as determined by assessing the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each metal against the strain. The order of resistance was Ni > Zn ¼ Cu ¼ Co > Cd. The strain removed a significant percentage (82%) of Ni from the medium during in vitro culture, whereas dead cell mass had an insignificant role in Ni removal. The quantum of Ni removal by the strain was interfered with when the other metals (Zn, Cu, Co, and Cd) were present either singly with Ni or in combination with other metals. However, the degree of interference varied with individual metal. The factors that influenced the quantum of Ni removal were ambient pH, initial cell density, and presence of other toxic metals. The strain was identified as Bacillus thuringiensis on the basis of its biochemical characteristics and 16s rDNA sequence analysis. KEYWORDS Bacillus thuringiensis, nickel removal INTRODUCTION
    Bioremediation Journal 04/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Biosorptive treatment using algal biomass of Rhizoclonium riparium was proposed for higher-loading gray water for its effective utilization. A batch sorption study was conducted using composite wastewater having a wide range of initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) values (2400–44,800 mg/L). The study showed an optimum dose of 5 g/L of biosorbent resulted in 96% reduction of COD for wastewater with an initial COD of 10,500 mg/L. The equilibrium isotherm data at different temperatures were fitted to linear and nonlinear isotherms. Biosorption kinetics was studied by various kinetic models. Chemical composition and surface morphology of the biosorbent were characterized by infrared, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy techniques before and after biosorption. Applicability of the biosorbent-treated wastewater in agricultural uses was explored by studying the effect of untreated and treated wastewater on the germination of two seeds, i.e., Vigna radiata and Lens esculenta, and subsequently the activity of peroxidase (POD) enzymes were studied to understand the toxicity in plants. The study revealed that compared with seeds treated with different dilutions of untreated wastewater, germination (%) was significantly higher for biosorbent-treated wastewater, with a reduced level of POD activity, indicating positive response of the seeds towards the biosorptive treatment. KEYWORDS algal biomass, biosorption, COD removal, gray water, seed germination, wastewater reuse
    Bioremediation Journal 01/2014; 18:1:56-70.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Soil samples isolated from dye-contaminated sites were exploited for isolation of dye decolorizing microorganisms. A novel bacterial mixture, RkNb1, was selected based on its efficiency, showing maximum and faster decolorization of textile dyes. Seven bacterial strains were isolated and identified from the bacterial mixture as Ochrobactrum intermedium (HM480365), Ochrobactrum intermedium strain M16-10-4 (HM030758), Enterococcus faecalis (HM480367), Arthrobacter crystallopoietes (HM480368), Kocuria flavus (HM480369), Bacillus beijingensis (HM480370), and Citrobacter freundii (HM480371) by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. This bacterial mixture showed 98.17% decolorization of Reactive Violet 5 (400 mg L−1) within 8 h. The culture exhibited good decolorization ability at pH 8 and at a temperature of 37°C. Malt extract and peptone was found to enhance the decolorization rate of Reactive Violet 5. Plackett-Burman experimental design was used for elucidation of medium components affecting Reactive Violet 5 decolorization. Dye degradation products obtained during the course of decolorization were analyzed by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The potential of this bacterial mixture to decolorize Reactive Violet 5 dye from manufacturing industry effluent is to be carried out using appropriate bioreactors.
    Bioremediation Journal 01/2014; 18(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Three 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol (2,3,4,6-TeCP)-mineralizing bacteria were isolated from the secondary sludge of a pulp and paper industry. The isolates used 2,3,4,6-TeCP as a source of carbon and energy and were capable of degrading this compound, as indicated by stoichiometric release of chloride and biomass formation. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the bacteria were identified as Bacillus megaterium (CL3), Staphylococcus suciri (CL10), and Bacillus thuringensis (CL11). High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis revealed that these isolates were able to degrade 2,3,4,6-TeCP at higher concentrations (600 mg/L or 2.5 mM). A consortia of the isolates completely removed 2,3,4,6-TeCP from the sludge obtained from a pulp and paper mill within 2 weeks when supplemented at a rate of 100 mg/L or 0.43 mM. A bacterial consortium also significantly reduced absorbable organic halogen (AOX) and extractable organic halogen (EOX) by 63% and 68%, respectively, from the sludge. These isolates have a high potential to remove 2,3,4,6-TeCP and may be used for remediation of pulp paper mill waste containing 2,3,4,6-TeCP.
    Bioremediation Journal 01/2014; 18(2).