Human Dimensions of Wildlife (Hum Dimens Wildl )

Publisher: Human Dimensions in Wildlife Study Group, Taylor & Francis

Description

Human Dimensions of Wildlife is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal devoted to the study of social considerations in fisheries and wildlife management. The journal was created to provide an open forum for exchange of human dimensions information.

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
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  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
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  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife website
  • Other titles
    Human dimensions of wildlife
  • ISSN
    1087-1209
  • OCLC
    34179670
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Wildlife tourism is an important platform to investigate the relationship between people and nature. Given that wildlife destinations are likely to receive higher tourism demand from new emerging economies, this article considers the wider emotional and psychological implications of wildlife watching. The growing significance of this tourist activity is a potential reawakening of a deeper ecological sub-consciousness brought about by a society which is disconnected from nature. Particular attention is given to the importance of experiencing nature first hand, the psychological benefits and the emotional responses that may engender a relationship of care. This is not only good for the human spirit but ultimately good for nature conservation as well.
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife 12/2014; In print.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The reintroduction of mammalian predators often has been met with controversy among citizens near reintroduction sites primarily because of concern for predation of livestock, pets, and game species. The river otter (Lontra canadensis) is an example of a predator widely reintroduced in the United States that has in some cases been negatively depicted in the media because of its predatory habits (i.e., fish eating). The reintroduction of river otters in Missouri, Ohio, Kentucky, and Illinois was followed by negative media messages pertaining to otters preying on fish. In contrast, the reintroduction of river otters in Pennsylvania (PA) was accompanied by positive media portrayals and overwhelming public support. This opinion piece reviews factors that likely contributed to public acceptance of river otter reintroduction in PA, emphasizing the importance of applying social science theories and methodologies as a basis for determining and accurately depicting public attitudes toward the reintroduction of mammalian predators.
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife 11/2014; 19(6).
  • Human Dimensions of Wildlife 11/2014; 19(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Understanding perceptual and situational factors underlying nuisance complaints can help managers maintain carnivore populations while mitigating conflicts with people. Our study uses data from a mail survey (n = 467 complainants about nuisance alligators, and n = 669 random Florida residents) and a three-step binary logistic regression analysis to examine how general attitudes, specific beliefs, and situational factors influence the behavior of reporting nuisance alligators. Residence adjacent to fresh water, the presence of outdoor pets, higher risk belief scores, higher nuisance belief scores, higher education, and older age were all related to complaining about an alligator, whereas general attitude toward alligators was not. Results are consistent with the “specificity principle” for attitude–behavior correspondence and emphasize the importance of situational factors as behavioral determinants. Targeted harvest areas can help to manage complaints in marginal habitats where risk from alligators is persistent. Information about protective behaviors and benefits of alligators can motivate residents to avoid dangerous encounters.
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife 11/2014; 19(6).
  • Human Dimensions of Wildlife 11/2014; 19(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Soundscapes have become recognized as an important natural resource. The traditional human-made versus natural soundscape comparison currently used in recreational resource management is challenged by borrowing soundscape components (i.e., biophony, anthrophony, geophony) from soundscape ecology. This article evaluated the soundscape preference of birders. A three-component model of recreational specialization was used to evaluate how recreationists differ in their preference for soundscape components. Data from in-person surveys collected at The Audubon Center and Sanctuary at Francis Beidler Forest in Harleyville, South Carolina were used in combination with surveys from online birding list servers to obtain a sample of 415 individuals with varying levels of specialization. The findings suggest soundscape preference exists as biophony, geophony, and anthrophony and that more specialized birders found geophony to be significantly more annoying than less specialized birders. Additionally, the skill and knowledge component of specialization best explained the difference in geophony preference among birders.
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife 11/2014; 19(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Wildlife tourism is an important platform to investigate the relationship between people and nature. Given that wildlife destinations are likely to receive higher tourism demand from new emerging economies, this article considers the wider emotional and psychological implications of wildlife watching. The growing significance of this tourist activity is a potential reawakening of a deeper ecological sub-consciousness brought about by a society that is disconnected from nature. Particular attention is given to the importance of experiencing nature first hand, the psychological benefits, and the emotional responses that may engender a relationship of care. This is good for both the human spirit and for nature conservation.
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife 11/2014; 19(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Given that many wildlife management agencies consider hunting to be central to wildlife conservation, a growing body of research describes ethical hunting using characterization framing (created by outsiders). This article describes an identity frame (created by insiders) of ethical hunting in the United States, based on analysis of hunter education manuals and official statements of hunting nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Similar themes permeated texts from both sources (e.g., obeying law, fair chase). NGOs, however, placed significantly more emphasis on being skilled (15% vs. 6%) and being motivated by experiencing nature (10% vs. 2%), whereas government agencies placed significantly more emphasis on respecting landowners (28% vs. 15%). Agencies may frame ethical hunting as more socially interdependent and rule abiding because they perceive a need to prioritize government authority (law) and property owner interests. These findings highlight a need for identity frames focusing on how hunting impacts biodiversity and humane treatment of animals.
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife 11/2014; 19(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The media has a significant role in spreading information about human–wildlife conflict, yet it is not the only information source available. The extent to which the public receives information about conflict from various sources, especially in areas where it is occurring, has not been well established. A questionnaire survey and media content analysis are used to uncover how the public receives information about mountain lion (Puma concolor) issues in Santa Cruz County, California. In the region, individuals had substantial experience with mountain lions. Residents also discussed mountain lion issues with friends and neighbors nearly as often as they read about them. In newspaper articles, citizens were cited more than any other group, including government agencies, scientists, and nongovernmental organizations. Understanding the high levels of public experience and information sharing can lend managers insight into attitudes, risk perception, and knowledge, while revealing opportunities for outreach beyond increasing media presence.
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife 11/2014; 19(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We consider the implications of public trust administration principles for collaborative fish and wildlife management. Collaboration can increase the capacity of agencies to provide fish- and wildlife-related benefits but increases the ties of agencies to some stakeholders—potentially privileging those stakeholders’ needs. We conducted two case studies of collaborative management in which we identified ways that collaboration enhanced and detracted from agencies’ capacities. We found that collaboration led to benefits for agencies, but that agencies had to make tradeoffs in the goals and objectives they pursued. With regard to meeting public trust responsibilities, we hypothesized that: (a) agencies gain from collaboration when they do not have the capacity to provide a certain type of fish- or wildlife-related benefit on their own; but (b) it is more challenging for agencies to provide benefits through collaborative efforts when they work with organizations that have goals that differ considerably from their own.
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife 09/2014; 19(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The trend in wildlife management over the last two decades has been to develop locally based approaches for responsiveness to local conditions, but some state wildlife agencies are finding the amount of staff time required to service this approach prohibitive. Although local engagement strategies have been lauded as assuring that public trust obligations of state government to citizens are met, we can expect that states with a local focus as their operational level of stakeholder engagement may opt to change their approach to reflect their resource limitations. We argue for comprehensive regional level effort to understand stakeholders augmented with local engagement processes where needed to deal with special circumstances in smaller areas within a region. Such an approach can be anticipated to have implications for stakeholder engagement and human dimensions research needs, which we discuss in the context of public trust resource administration and good governance of wildlife resources.
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife 09/2014; 19(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Public Trust Doctrine (PTD) vests states with a fiduciary responsibility to manage wildlife for the benefit of current and future generations. States have varied approaches to applying the PTD for wildlife management ranging from a traditional focus on hunters, anglers, and trappers to a progressive approach of broad inclusion of all potential stakeholders in their decision-making processes. We argue that states need to gather and incorporate more and better human dimensions (HD) information to fulfill their PTD responsibilities. We describe some of the barriers to increased use of HD and the changes in agency culture, staffing, data gathering, and decision-making processes necessary to integrate HD effectively and comport with the PTD. We conclude that in addition to increasing fulfillment of PTD responsibilities, increased use of HD information will help maintain agency relevance, increase political support, and secure broader agency funding.
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife 09/2014; 19(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Public trust thinking (PTT) offers a philosophical orientation toward natural resources and a means of addressing persistent and emerging challenges in environmental conservation. It has inspired laws and policies around the world and is receiving increasing attention among scholars and natural resource practitioners. Nevertheless, attempts to develop and implement PTT are hampered by lack of clarity: no clear single statement of principles that unite PTT’s diverse expressions exists. We address this need by synthesizing PTT literature across academic disciplines. We identify four areas that are in need of development and offer five principles that characterize PTT: (1) Human well-being is dependent on benefits provided by ecosystems; (2) Certain resources are not suitable for exclusive private ownership; (3) All beneficiaries are equal; (4) Future generations should be considered in current resource management decisions; and (5) Trustees are bound by fiduciary obligations and are publicly accountable.
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife 09/2014; 19(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) network (Network), comprised of 22 conservation partnerships spanning North America and U.S. Islands, is uniquely positioned to assist government members in fulfilling their public trust obligations to sustain natural and cultural resources for current and future generations by (a) ensuring inclusivity of broad stakeholder participation in conservation decision-making, and (b) building capacity for public trust to work in conservation, thus increasing the chance for successful and lasting conservation outcomes. In this article, we discuss the vision for the Network; challenges individual LCCs and the Network face in achieving the vision of sustaining natural and cultural resources for the benefit of current and future generations, a public trust obligation of most of the members; and ways in which member LCCs are making progress in this regard. We offer recommendations for the Network to consider to improve its ability to meet public trust obligations.
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife 09/2014; 19(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: North American wildlife is treated as a public trust resource (PTR), managed for the benefit of all people by government. Wildlife managers historically used restrictive regulations and enforced compliance to recover many species. Present-day societal needs include reducing some abundant game populations. Hunters often oppose this objective, creating tension between managing PTRs and gaining trust of hunters upon whose cooperation management depends. We assessed effects of normative and personal gains on cooperation of hunters through their purchase of antlerless deer licenses and their trust in the agency regarding bovine tuberculosis eradication from Michigan white-tailed deer. Logit modeling of hunter survey data indicated trust was influenced by procedural justice and personal gains. Only a single procedural justice variable was a statistically significant cooperation predictor. Findings suggest agencies may gain trust more readily than cooperation through procedurally just exercise of authority. Additional research is needed to identify meaningful gains associated with trust.
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife 09/2014; 19(5).
  • Human Dimensions of Wildlife 09/2014; 19(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The public trust doctrine (PTD) is the common law basis for governments to hold wildlife in trust for the benefit of current and future generations of Americans. Wildlife as a public trust resource is the foundation of the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation. We examine principles that underlie a trustee’s role in the context of the PTD and governmental responsibility. We evaluate purposes of and needs for human dimensions inquiry in execution of a trustee’s wildlife stewardship responsibility. We conclude human dimensions research is essential for government to fulfill its responsibilities as trustee, particularly considering the breadth and often conflicting interests of stakeholders. Human dimensions research can serve an important function in identifying and affirming core societal values toward wildlife that underpin the PTD and in monitoring shifts in society’s values to ensure resiliency of the trustee role and relevance and legitimacy of institutional norms of wildlife resource governance.
    Human Dimensions of Wildlife 09/2014; 19(5).