Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application

Description

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  • Other titles
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare, Best practices and benchmarking
  • ISSN
    1085-0635
  • OCLC
    33267450
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Highmark Blue Cross/Blue Shield Pegasus Project was created in the fall of 1996 to benchmark best practices at health plans around the United States through extensive interviews, literature searches, and other measures. Characteristics of highly successful health plans across a number of major categories are summarized in the final recommendations presented by this report.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(3):112-7.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The evolving paradigm shift in healthcare emphasizes population health status. Disease management is gaining popularity as a means of providing cost-effective, quality healthcare to an entire population at risk. Outcomes measurements, standardized clinical protocols and commitment by physicians and staff are crucial to a successful program. This article presents a case study from Lovelace Health Systems in Albuquerque, N.M., and identifies key components, cost savings and successes of one of its disease management programs.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(6):254-7.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The editors are providing this Executive Summary by the University HealthSystem Consortium of their Adult ICU Benchmarking Project. The report has been reviewed by the participating members listed at the end of the summary. The summary report provides both an interesting account of how a benchmarking project of considerable magnitude can be accomplished but also indicates how important comparative data can be used to improve individual programs.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(4):147-53.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A study of 11 Academic Health Center Teaching Hospitals (ATHs) in 11 states found that cost reduction programs, internal reorganizations, reengineering, benchmarking, and broadened entrepreneurial activity were prominent among the strategic initiatives reported in dealing with an increasingly turbulent environment. Although none of the ATHs had experienced negative net margins, we conclude that today's competitive healthcare system requires ATHs be reimbursed separately for their educational and other societally related costs to assist them in competing on a level playing fields.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(6):258-64.
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    ABSTRACT: Iatrogenic injury, in which patients are unintentionally injured by medical treatment, occurs in 4% of hospital admissions and causes considerable human suffering, financial losses, and waste of healthcare resources. This article discusses why existing quality initiatives have had little impact on iatrogenic injury and suggests an approach to clinical risk modification that may enhance the safety of medical treatment.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(6):221-6.
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    ABSTRACT: This article will examine the impact of the use of physician extenders, specifically physician assistants and surgical physician assistants, on various pertinent healthcare issues. These issues include cost containment strategies, physician productivity, reimbursement, liability, manpower issues, and continuity and quality of patient care.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(3):136-41.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Similar to the Residents Review Committee's "Essentials for a Residency Training Program," this article provides Educational Practice Guidelines for a required surgical clerkship. The Guidelines presented are ones that can be adopted by any department of surgery in the United States, but in some cases not without significant increase in resources and faculty effort. The 10 essential components provide an opportunity for intensive program evaluation of all medical student clerkship experiences.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(5):214-8.
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    ABSTRACT: The following article is a descriptive summary of telemedicine evolution in rural Kansas. Multiple electronic applications are used to manage information, time, and distance. Conservation of limited health related resources is emphasized.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(1):28-32.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Patient perceptions of the quality of services provided are a key factor in determining a healthcare organization's competitive advantage and survival. This article examines the advantages, disadvantages, and problems associated with nine different qualitative and quantitative methods of measuring patient satisfaction with service quality and concludes with guidelines for measurement of patient satisfaction and implementation of managerial follow-up.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(6):227-39.
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    ABSTRACT: A small urban hospital identified angina pectoris (DRG 140) as a high-cost and low-reimbursement DRG. Variation in the process of care for patients with cardiac chest pain was related to the timing of decisions on stress tests and whether inpatient GI workups were performed. Underutilization of aspirin was identified as a quality of care issue. In collaboration with Texas Medical Foundation (TMF), the Quality Improvement Organization (QIO) for Texas, this became the initial Health Care Quality Improvement Program (HCQIP) project and the first effort by the hospital at pathway development. A team effort lead by physicians, including other healthcare groups at the hospital, identified elements considered essential to providing ideal care for patients with cardiac chest pain, formulating these elements into a clinical pathway. Emergency room physicians, an essential stakeholder group, had not been included in the initial pathway development, which proved to be a critical factor to effective implementation. Pathway implementation was associated with increased administration of aspirin by 45.7% (p < 0.001), reduced length of stay by 1.0 days (p = 0.064), and reduced total charges by an average of $1710.20 (p = 0.039). These results suggest that process of care improvement, i.e., clinical pathway implementation, in collaboration with a QIO, contributed to reduced variation in the process of care. Participation by all stakeholders from the beginning in process of care improvement is essential.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(3):118-22.
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    ABSTRACT: There is a significant but different role for hospital staff nurses within a managed care environment. This article describes the role and reviews major areas where the staff nurse is critical in achieving positive patient outcomes that are cost-effective and efficient.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(4):162-7.
  • Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(2):82-7.
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    ABSTRACT: As healthcare experts continue to reform the United States healthcare system, greater attention is being given to the issue of the United States physician workforce. This article provides a synopsis of the present workforce issue and then addresses these issues from the perspective of subspecialty surgery by using two fields as examples.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(3):123-35.
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    ABSTRACT: An individual program's viewpoint on the overall benchmarking process for critical care medicine and how this process can provide a conceptual understanding of how benchmarking can be beneficial.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(4):154-61.
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    ABSTRACT: A systematic method for assessing the health status of communities has been under development at the University of South Florida since 1991. The system, known as CATCH, draws 226 indicators from multiple sources and uses an innovative comparative framework and weighted evaluation criteria to produce a rank-ordered community problem list. The CATCH results from II Floridian counties have focused attention on high priority health problems and provided a framework for measuring the impact of health expenditures on community health status outcomes. The method and plans to create an automated data warehouse to support its expansion and enrichment are described.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(5):196-207.
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    ABSTRACT: During the 1994 flu season, the Missouri Patient Care Review Foundation (MPCRF) began working on a systems-oriented, hospital-focused influenza immunization project for the 1995-96 flu season with four acute care hospitals. The results of the project indicate that a combination of hospital policies, nurse-driven standing order protocols for immunization, and emphasis on beneficiary education resulted in the highest rate of influenza vaccination.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(1):33-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Technology assessment has become a rapidly growing component of the healthcare system. It has assumed a functional role in operational settings and is rapidly impacting decisions involving purchasing, coverage, and reimbursement. This review is intended to assist the healthcare decision maker in considering the application of technology assessment in healthcare, so as to maximize the efficiency of future purchasing decisions. This "best practice" was synthesized after identifying key institutions performing technology assessment in healthcare and analyzing their working processes, including literature review, consensus panel discussions, and expert opinion. We describe this best practice on a reiterative loop that consists of five processes: awareness, strategic appropriateness, analysis versus need, acquisition and implementation, and reassessment. Typical barriers to adoption of technology assessment are also identified and discussed. This review suggests a common terminology for the core processes involved in technology assessment, thereby facilitating a more uniform understanding among the different components of the healthcare system (i.e., payer, provider, and society) while recognizing their different perspectives.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(6):240-53.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The editors are providing this Executive Summary by the University HealthSystem Consortium of their Emergency Department Benchmarking Project. The report has been reviewed by the participating members listed at the end of the summary. The summary report provides both an interesting account of how a benchmarking project of considerable magnitude can be accomplished but also indicates how important comparative data can be used to improve individual programs.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(5):185-95.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A leadership competency model was tailored to the culture and strategic direction of BJC Health System by correlating indicators of effective leader behavior with measures of success in the organization. We present the competency model, describe how it was derived, and enumerate ways it will be used to support BJC's transition to an integrated healthcare delivery and financing system.
    Best practices and benchmarking in healthcare: a practical journal for clinical and management application 01/1997; 2(2):63-70.