Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication (J COMPUT-MEDIAT COMM )

Publisher: Annenberg School of Communications (University of Southern California); Universiṭah ha-ʻIvrit bi-Yerushalayim. School of Business Administration, Blackwell Publishing

Description

The Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication (JCMC) is a web-based, peer-reviewed scholarly journal. Its focus is social science research on computer-mediated communication via the Internet, the World Wide Web, and wireless technologies. Within that general purview, the journal is broadly interdisciplinary, publishing work by scholars in communication, business, education, political science, sociology, media studies, information science, and other disciplines. Acceptable formats for submission include original research articles, meta-analyses of prior research, synthesizing literature surveys, and proposals for special issues. JCMC is one of the oldest web-based Internet studies journals in existence, having been published quarterly continuously since June 1995. The journal was started by Margaret McLaughlin and Sheizaf Rafaeli in response to the growth of CMC scholarship in the early- to mid-1990s. The founding editors had the vision to make JCMC an open-access, online journal. This, combined with high quality standards, proved to be a recipe for success: today JCMC is widely read and cited by CMC scholars around the world. In 2004, JCMC became an official journal of the International Communication Association.

  • Impact factor
    2.17
  • 5-year impact
    4.57
  • Cited half-life
    4.90
  • Immediacy index
    0.09
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    1.74
  • Website
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication website
  • Other titles
    Journal of computer-mediated communication, JCMC
  • ISSN
    1083-6101
  • OCLC
    32846428
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Blackwell Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Some journals impose embargoes typically of 6 or 12 months, occasionally of 24 months
    • no listing of affected journals available as yet
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • Publisher version cannot be used
    • On author or institutional or subject-based server
    • Server must be non-commercial
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with set statement ("The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com ")
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'Blackwell Publishing' is an imprint of 'Wiley-Blackwell'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Scholars have confirmed that political candidates are increasingly turning to social network sites (SNS) to persuade voters to vote for them, and that these sites have become prominent sources of political information. But a fundamental question arises about the sustainability of social networks as a campaign tool: How much do users trust the information they find there? This study employed an online survey to examine the degree to which politically interested online users view SNS as credible. SNS were ranked the least credible among the nine traditional and online sources examined. Reliance on social networks proved the strongest predictor of SNS credibility.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 05/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A total of 11,018 employees participated in a survey investigating whether demographic, personality, and work-related variables could explain variance in attitudes towards and actual use of social network sites for personal purposes during working hours. Age was negatively related to both dependent variables. Male gender, single status, and education were positively associated with both dependent variables. Managers had negative attitudes to use, but top-level managers reported more use than other respondents. Access to social network sites at the workplace was positively related to both dependent variables, whereas policies prohibiting showed the opposite relationship. Extraversion and Neuroticism were positively related to both dependent variables. Conscientiousness, positive challenge at work, and quantitative demands were all negatively related to both dependent variables.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 05/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article explores readings of (micro)blogging services as outlets for playful, “imperfect” language. Adopting a transcultural approach, it examines a blog category that has attracted scarce academic attention to date: the creative worker's blog. Through a qualitative analysis of metalinguistic statements by 14 Russian writer-bloggers, the author tests 2 interdependent hypotheses: (H1) through metalinguistic statements and pragmatic strategies, writers present language play and “imperfect” language as prototypical for new media; and (H2) If H1 is correct, the writer-blogger's preference for “imperfect” language caters into a broader cultural-philosophical anxiety – one of foregrounding imperfection as an aesthetic counterresponse to digital perfection.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 05/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Community technology centers and libraries have been crucial components of public policy initiatives to reduce the digital divide. Using theories of structuration and the social construction of technology, this paper examines the gender dynamics of the digital divide at public access points in Austin, TX over 10 years. Using extensive participant observations, we found male users outnumber female users in public access Internet usage, even accounting for age and ethnicity. In-depth interviews revealed that both sexes saw public access as the least desirable place to use the Internet, but discourses around libraries differed. Female interviewees associated libraries with nostalgia for books and family, while male interviewees associated libraries with technology. Older female users also described feelings of technophobia.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This paper examines the ways transgender users manoeuver between online and offline worlds in order to negotiate their complicated gender identity and to overcome offline impediments. The study is based on virtual ethnography and discourse analysis within two online arenas, a newsgroup and a website, which are central to the Israeli transgender community. The analysis suggests that transgender users employ cyberspace as preliminary, complementary, and/or alternative spheres. Delving deeper into the meaning of the alternative sphere, the paper revisits 2 central issues in Internet research, namely the relationships between the online and the offline worlds, and identity management within online settings. The paper concludes by proposing a new term – VirtuReal – to address these issues.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 05/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this article, we use the somewhat unusual lens of joke translation to examine the process of "user-generated globalization" – cross-national diffusion of content by Internet users. We tracked the translations of 100 popular jokes in English into 9 languages and analyzed them quantitatively and qualitatively. Our findings indicate that (1) web-based diffusion of translated jokes is common but varies greatly, both between languages and between jokes; (2) "global hits" differ from "translation-resistant" jokes in their themes and incorporation of American markers; and (3) translated joke versions tend to include only minor cultural alternations (such as name shifting), thereby preserving the original messages. Overall, these findings suggest that Internet jokes serve as powerful (albeit often invisible) agents of globalization and Americanization.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 05/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ideological groups use the Internet to deliver their messages unhindered by the constraints of traditional media. We examined how ideological groups promote their worldview through their websites. Using the elaboration likelihood model (ELM), this research used trained coders to examine the websites of nonideological groups (n = 37), nonviolent ideological groups (n = 36), and violent ideological groups (n = 32) for credibility, persuasion processing cues, and interactivity factors. Results of this study found that the websites of violent ideological groups use more fear appeals, were less interactive, and were the least credible of the 3 groups. All 3 groups used more central cues than peripheral suggesting they focused on evidence for their arguments rather than emotion.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 05/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Research suggests that personality dictates specific Internet preferences. One area that remains relatively unexplored is the influence of personality on engagement with social networking sites (SNSs). The current study employs a ‘Uses and Gratifications’ framework to investigate whether personality, age, and sex predict motivations for using SNSs. The study explores both global and specific factors of personality using Eysenck's EPQ‐R short form (extraversion, neuroticism and psychoticism) and Beck's SAS (sociotropy and autonomy). Principal component analysis identified ten distinct motivational components, which were then successfully predicted by individual differences through regression analyses. It is therefore suggested that individuals with different profiles vary in their motivations for using SNSs. Results support theoretical assumptions based on previous literature and personality dispositions.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 04/2014; 19(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study examines the tele‐cocooning hypothesis in the context of general trust using a nationally representative survey of Japanese youth. We find that although frequency of texting is positively correlated with general trust, this correlation is spuriously caused by how heavy mobile texters interpret the words “most people” in the general trust measurement. Heavy users assume that “most people” only refers to friends, family, and others going to the same school. When the effect of the “most people” assumption is controlled, the positive association between texting and general trust disappears. Further exploration of the data shows that heavy texting nevertheless has negative implications for social tolerance and social caution, both of which are theoretically proximate to general trust.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 04/2014; 19(3).
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Considering the debate over U.S. immigration reform and the way digital communication technologies increasingly are being used to spark protests, this qualitative study examines focus group discourse of immigration activists to explore how digital media are transforming the definitions of “activism” and “activist.” Analysis suggests technologies are perhaps pacifying would‐be activists, convincing them they are contributing more than they actually are. Thus, “slacktivism,” or “clicktivism” that takes just a mouse click is potentially diluting “real” activism.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 04/2014; 19(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article introduces and provides the context for the themed section on mobile communication in Asia. It suggests that much work remains to be done in adequately grasping the new mobile, mediated face of communication in the very diverse Asian region. It also suggests that such a new direction in research needs to go hand in hand with rethinking the conceptual and theoretical bases of mobile, and indeed, Internet and computer-mediated communication.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 04/2014; 19(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study investigated what sources were relied on to find out about Osama bin Laden's death and whether perceptions of credibility and political party affiliation influenced these media choices. The most striking difference in media reliance for bin Laden news was that whatever sources Tea Partiers relied on and thought credible were those that Democrats did not rely on or see as credible. Despite the clamor about how quickly news flows through social network sites and Twitter, only about 5% of respondents first heard about bin Laden through these sources and a slightly larger percentage spread the news via these tools. Moreover, social network sites and Twitter were the least relied on about the aftermath of bin Laden's death.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 04/2014; 19(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article investigates whether smartphones function as environments of polymedia (Madianou & Miller, 2012) and assesses their consequences for transnational families. Drawing on research with UK-based Filipino migrants, the article observes that users treat smartphones as integrated environments of communicative opportunities and exploit the differences within media in order to express emotions and manage their relationships with their family members who remain in the Philippines. For smartphone users, being online emerges as the default position and there is evidence that new media become constitutive of relationships in situations of extreme separation. However, technology cannot overcome difficulties that are fundamentally social. Moreover, the article observes the emergence of a new ‘care divide’ between those who own smartphones and those who do not.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 03/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Given the prevalence of online media today, credibility continues to be a popular subject of empirical research. However, studies examining the effects of discrediting strategies are rare. This issue is significant given the popularity of online media and the ease of such sources to spread misinformation. Therefore, the present study examines the effects of attacking the expertise and trustworthiness of a proponent of a major social issue. Results showed that support as well specific combinations of discrediting attack strategies significantly reduced message board readers' perceptions of the proponent's credibility. In addition, attacks on either the proponent's expertise or trustworthiness resulted in a reduced likelihood of readers taking action with respect to the issue.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 03/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study presents a novel examination of changes in attributions about individuals via information obtained from online sources within the context of hiring decisions. An experiment had 127 participants examine dossiers collected about a job applicant, in some conditions containing either positively or negatively valenced information about the applicant, obtained from the Internet. Results indicated online information significantly increases attributional certainty and positively valenced online information led to more favorable impressions of the applicant's perceived fit and employability. Surprisingly, results also violate assumptions of the increased magnitude of attributions due to negative information. Findings are discussed with respect to uncertainty reduction strategies, the negativity effect of online information, and implications for job seekers and employers.
    Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 03/2014;

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