Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) (J REFRACT SURG )

Publisher: International Society of Refractive Surgery

Description

The Journal of Refractive Surgery, the official publication of the International Society of Refractive Surgery and its affiliated societies, is a bimonthly forum for original research, review, and evaluation of refractive and corneal surgical procedures. In addition to peer-reviewed scientific articles, regular features such as New Ideas, Case Reports, Consultations in Refractive Surgery, New Commentary, Abstracts, and Opinions help keep the surgeon abreast of this ever-changing specialty.

  • Impact factor
    2.47
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    2.61
  • Cited half-life
    5.40
  • Immediacy index
    0.67
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.89
  • Website
    Journal of Refractive Surgery website
  • Other titles
    Journal of refractive surgery
  • ISSN
    1081-597X
  • OCLC
    56970461
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To describe the main causes of explantation of phakic intraocular lenses (PIOLs) according to the anatomical site of implantation (angle supported, iris fixated, or posterior chamber). METHODS: This multicentrical, retrospective, and consecutive study sponsored by the Spanish Ministry of Health comprised a total of 240 eyes (226 patients) explanted due to PIOL complications. Clinical data of 144 angle-supported lenses, 24 iris-fixated lenses, and 72 posterior chamber lenses explanted were recorded preoperatively and postoperatively. RESULTS: Mean age of the patients at explantation was 46.30 ± 11.84 years (range: 25 to 80 years). The mean time between implantation and explantation was 381.14 ± 293.55 weeks (range: 0.00 to 1,551.17 weeks). It was 422.33 ± 287.81 weeks for the angle-supported group, 488.03 ± 351.95 weeks for the iris-fixated group, and 234.11 ± 4,221.60 weeks for the posterior chamber group. It was 8.10 ± 5.52 years for the angle-supported group, 9.36 ± 6.75 years for the iris-fixated group, and 4.49 ± 4.25 years for the posterior chamber group. This period of time was significantly shorter in the posterior chamber group (P < .001). Overall, the main causes of explantation were cataract formation (132 eyes, 55%), endothelial cell loss (26 eyes, 10.83%), corneal decompensation (22 eyes, 9.17%), PIOL dislocation/decentration (16 eyes, 6.67%), inadequate PIOL size or power (12 eyes, 5%), and pupil ovalization (10 cases, 4.17%). Cataract development was the cause of explantation in 51.39% of angle-supported cases, 45.83% of iris-fixated cases, and 65.28% of posterior chamber cases. Endothelial cell loss was the cause of explantation in 15.97% of angle-supported PIOLs, 8.33% of iris-fixated PIOLs, and 1.39% of posterior chamber PIOLs. CONCLUSIONS: Cataract is the main cause of PIOL explantation, especially in posterior chamber PIOLs. In the angle-supported group, endothelial cell loss was the second cause of explantation
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 12/2014; 31(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To describe the main causes of explantation of phakic intraocular lenses (PIOLs) according to the anatomical site of implantation (angle supported, iris fixated, or posterior chamber). This multicentrical, retrospective, and consecutive study sponsored by the Spanish Ministry of Health comprised a total of 240 eyes (226 patients) explanted due to PIOL complications. Clinical data of 144 angle-supported lenses, 24 iris-fixated lenses, and 72 posterior chamber lenses explanted were recorded preoperatively and postoperatively. Mean age of the patients at explantation was 46.30 ± 11.84 years (range: 25 to 80 years). The mean time between implantation and explantation was 381.14 ± 293.55 weeks (range: 0.00 to 1,551.17 weeks). It was 422.33 ± 287.81 weeks for the angle-supported group, 488.03 ± 351.95 weeks for the iris-fixated group, and 234.11 ± 4,221.60 weeks for the posterior chamber group. It was 8.10 ± 5.52 years for the angle-supported group, 9.36 ± 6.75 years for the iris-fixated group, and 4.49 ± 4.25 years for the posterior chamber group. This period of time was significantly shorter in the posterior chamber group (P < .001). Overall, the main causes of explantation were cataract formation (132 eyes, 55%), endothelial cell loss (26 eyes, 10.83%), corneal decompensation (22 eyes, 9.17%), PIOL dislocation/decentration (16 eyes, 6.67%), inadequate PIOL size or power (12 eyes, 5%), and pupil ovalization (10 cases, 4.17%). Cataract development was the cause of explantation in 51.39% of angle-supported cases, 45.83% of iris-fixated cases, and 65.28% of posterior chamber cases. Endothelial cell loss was the cause of explantation in 15.97% of angle-supported PIOLs, 8.33% of iris-fixated PIOLs, and 1.39% of posterior chamber PIOLs. Cataract is the main cause of PIOL explantation, especially in posterior chamber PIOLs. In the angle-supported group, endothelial cell loss was the second cause of explantation. [J Refract Surg. 2015;31(1):XX-XX.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 12/2014;
  • Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 12/2014; 30(12):800-2.
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    ABSTRACT: To report the visual and refractive outcomes of small incision lenticule extraction for low myopia using the VisuMax femtosecond laser (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Jena, Germany). A retrospective analysis of 120 consecutive small incision lenticule extraction procedures was performed for low myopia. Inclusion criteria were preoperative spherical equivalent refraction up to -3.50 diopters (D), cylinder up to 1.50 D, and corrected distance visual acuity of 20/20 or better. Outcomes analysis was performed for all eyes with 1-year follow-up according to the Standard Graphs for Reporting Refractive Surgery, and also including mesopic contrast sensitivity. One-year data were available for 110 eyes (92%). Preoperatively, mean spherical equivalent refraction was -2.61 ± 0.54 D (range: -1.03 to -3.50 D) and mean cylinder was 0.55 ± 0.38 D (range: 0.00 to 1.50 D). Postoperatively, mean spherical equivalent refraction was -0.05 ± 0.36 D (range: -0.94 to +1.25 D) and mean cylinder was ±0.50 D in 84% and ±1.00 D in 99% of eyes. Uncorrected distance visual acuity was 20/20 or better in 96% of eyes and 20/25 or better in 100% of eyes. One line of corrected distance visual acuity was lost in 9%, but no eyes lost two or more lines. There was an initial overcorrection in mean spherical equivalent refraction on day 1 (+0.37 D) as expected, which regressed to +0.10 D at 1 month and -0.05 D at 3 months, after which stability was reached (mean spherical equivalent refraction was -0.05 D at 1 year). Contrast sensitivity at 1 year was slightly increased at 3, 6, 12, and 18 cycles per degree (P < .05). Small incision lenticule extraction for low myopia was found to be safe and effective with outcomes similar to those previously reported for LASIK. [J Refract Surg. 2014;30(12):812-818.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 12/2014; 30(12):812-8.
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    ABSTRACT: To compare postoperative astigmatic correction between femtosecond lenticule extraction (FLEx) and wavefront-guided LASIK in eyes with myopic astigmatism. Fifty-eight eyes of 41 patients undergoing FLEx and 49 eyes of 29 patients undergoing wavefront-guided LASIK to correct myopic astigmatism were examined. Visual acuity, cylindrical refraction, predictability of the astigmatic correction, and astigmatic vector components were compared between groups 6 months after surgery. There was no statistically significant difference in manifest cylindrical refraction (P = .08) or percentage of eyes within ±0.50 diopter (D) of its refraction (P = .11) between the surgical procedures. The index of success in FLEx was statistically significantly better than that of wavefront-guided LASIK (P = .02), although there was no significant difference between the groups in other indices (eg, surgically induced astigmatism, target-induced astigmatism, astigmatic correction index, angle of error, difference vector, and flattening index). Subgroup analysis showed that FLEx had a better index of success (P = .02) and difference vector (P = .04) than wavefront-guided LASIK in the low cylinder subgroup; the angle of error in FLEx was significantly smaller than that of wavefront-guided LASIK in the moderate cylinder subgroup (P = .03). Both FLEx and wavefront-guided LASIK worked well for the correction of myopic astigmatism by the 6-month follow-up visit. Although FLEx had a better index of success than wavefront-guided LASIK when using vector analysis, it appears equivalent to wavefront-guided LASIK in terms of visual acuity and the correction of astigmatism. [J Refract Surg. 2014;30(12):806-811.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 12/2014; 30(12):806-11.
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    ABSTRACT: To report a new indication for flap lift of interface blood using the WaveLight FS200 femtosecond laser (Alcon Laboratories, Inc., Fort Worth, TX). The unique evacuation canal of the FS200 femtosecond laser allows blood from injured limbal vasculature to accumulate. In rare instances, blood extends from the canal into the flap interface, requiring a flap lift. All flap lifts were performed using the microscope in the laser suite on the FS200 femtosecond laser to remove postoperative flap interface blood in 3 eyes of 3 patients. All interface blood was removed and no patients experienced re-bleeding. Postoperatively, patients achieved an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20. When intracanal blood is noted, planned incomplete dissection of the flap to the canal edge may prevent the progression of blood in the interface. [J Refract Surg. 2014;30(12):858-860.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 12/2014; 30(12):858-60.
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the outcome of accelerated and conventional corneal cross-linking (CXL) procedures regarding their effect on morphological and optical properties of the cornea. One hundred fifty-three eyes of 153 patients were evaluated before and during a 15-month follow-up period after CXL (76 eyes in the conventional group and 77 eyes in the accelerated group). Measured variables include corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), refraction, maximum keratometry, endothelial cell density, anterior and posterior stromal keratocyte density, and subbasal nerve density. All variables were compared between the two study groups. Cylindrical and spherical components of refraction improved significantly during 15 months of follow-up. No difference was observed between the two study groups. UDVA and CDVA improved in the same manner, with no intergroup differences. Endothelial cell density did not change significantly during the follow-up period in either group. K-max increased slightly in the first month of the follow-up, but started to decrease at postoperative visits without any significant difference in the two groups. Anterior stromal keratocyte density and subbasal nerve density decreased significantly in both groups 1 month postoperatively. Both variables had a more significant decrease in the conventional group at all visits before the 1-year visit. At the final 15-month visit, there were no significant differences in any value between the two groups. Accelerated and conventional CXL seem to have a comparable and acceptable effect on keratoconus in the short-term follow-up period. [J Refract Surg. 2014;30(12):837-842.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 12/2014; 30(12):837-42.
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    ABSTRACT: To prospectively compare the achieved thickness and consistency of LASIK flaps created with a 60- and 150-kHz femtosecond laser. One hundred twenty eyes of 60 patients with myopia were treated with LASIK. One eye had flap created by the Intralase FS 60-kHz femtosecond laser (Abbott Medical Optics, Abbott Park, IL) and the fellow eye was treated with the IntraLase iFS 150-kHz femtosecond laser (Abbott Medical Optics). Eyes were randomized according to ocular dominance. Flap morphology and measurements were taken with anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) at the 1-month postoperative visit. AS-OCT showed similar regular planar morphologies in both groups. The mean thickness of the flaps in the FS 60 group was significantly higher than that of the iFS 150 group (105.4 ± 3.9 μm vs 103.9 ± 4.8 μm, P = .009). The mean deviation from targeted flap thickness was not significantly different between the two groups. The Intralase iFS 150-kHz femtosecond laser creates flaps of similar thickness and uniformity to the Intralase FS 60-kHz femtosecond laser. [J Refract Surg. 2014;30(12):827-830.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 12/2014; 30(12):827-30.
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the rotational stability of a new one-piece hydrophobic acrylic toric intraocular lens (IOL) using a custom-developed software for analysis of slit-lamp photographs. In a prospective, multicenter study, 174 eyes were implanted with the TECNIS Toric IOL (Abbott Medical Optics, Inc., Santa Ana, CA). A custom-developed software was used to analyze high-resolution slit-lamp photographs of 156 eyes taken at day 1 (baseline) and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. The software uses iris and sclera landmarks to align the baseline image and later images for comparison. Validation of software was performed through repeated analyses of protractor images rotated from 0.1° to 10.0° and randomly selected photographs of 20 eyes. Software validation showed precision (repeatability plus reproducibility variation) of 0.02° using protractor images and 2.22° using slit-lamp photographs. Good quality slit-lamp images and clear landmarks were necessary for precise measurements. At 6 months, 94.2% of eyes had 5° or less change in IOL orientation versus baseline; only 2 eyes (1.4%) had axis shift greater than 30°. Most eyes were within 5° or less of rotation between 1 and 3 months (92.9%) and 3 and 6 months (94.1%). Mean absolute axis change (± standard deviation) from 1 day to 6 months was 2.70° ± 5.51°. The new custom software was precise and quick in analyzing slit-lamp photographs to determine postoperative toric IOL rotation. [J Refract Surg. 2014;30(12):820-826.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 12/2014; 30(12):820-6.
  • Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 12/2014; 30(12):798.
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the efficiency and safety of accelerated corneal cross-linking in pediatric patients with progressive keratoconus. In this retrospective interventional case series, 44 eyes of 38 pediatric patients with progressive keratoconus were enrolled. All consecutive patients underwent accelerated corneal cross-linking with settings of 30 mW/cm(2) for 4 minutes, corresponding to a total dose of 7.2 J. The efficacy and safety of the procedure were assessed over a 24-month follow-up period. Mean ± standard deviation age of 10 girls and 28 boys was 15.3 ± 2.1 years (range: 9 to 18 years). Uncorrected distance visual acuity improved significantly from 0.52 ± 0.36 to 0.39 ± 0.26 logMAR (P = .002), and corrected distance visual acuity improved significantly from 0.38 ± 0.24 to 0.30 ± 0.20 logMAR (P < .001). Mean spherical and cylindrical refraction were not significantly altered (P > .001 for both). At the last follow-up visit, the flat keratometry value decreased from baseline from 46.4 ± 3.0 to 46.0 ± 2.9 diopters and the steep keratometry value decreased from 50.6 ± 4.2 to 50.1 ± 4.0 diopters (P < .001 for both). The total higher-order aberrations, coma, and astigmatism II values were also significantly decreased at 24 months after treatment (P < .05 for all). No serious complications were recorded during the follow-up. The findings revealed that accelerated corneal cross-linking halted the keratoconus progression without relevant side effects in pediatric patients over a 24-month follow-up period. Visual acuity, keratometric values, and corneal aberrations also improved. [J Refract Surg. 2014;30(12):843-849.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 12/2014; 30(12):843-9.
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the postoperative corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF) of eyes implanted with a small aperture corneal inlay versus fellow eyes. Medical records of patients who underwent small aperture corneal inlay (KAMRA; AcuFocus, Inc., Irvine, CA) implantation were retrospectively reviewed. There were two groups: the implanted and non-implanted. Main outcome measures were CH, CRF, Goldmann-correlated intraocular pressure (IOPg), corneal-compensated IOP (IOPcc), and Goldmann applanation tonometry measurements performed preoperatively and at postoperative week 1 and months 1, 3, and 6. The study included 68 eyes of 34 patients. CH was higher in the implanted group when compared with the non-implanted group at postoperative week 1 (12.2 ± 3.1 vs 10.9 ± 1.7 mm Hg; P = .007) and month 1 (12.3 ± 2.5 vs 10.9 ± 1.8 mm Hg; P = .001). CRF was higher in the implanted group when compared with the non-implanted group at postoperative week 1 (11.9 ± 2.9 vs 10.7 ± 1.6 mm Hg; P = .003) and month 1 (12.5 ± 2.5 vs 10.4 ± 1.8 mm Hg; P < .001). IOPcc was higher in the implanted group when compared with the non-implanted group at only the first postoperative month (17.1 ± 3.5 vs 14.3 ± 2.9 mm Hg; P < .001). There were no statistically significant differences in Goldmann applanation tonometry or IOPg measurements between the two groups (P > .05). At the 3-month postoperative visit, all parameters had returned to baseline and there was no change at the 6-month visit. Implantation of the KAMRA corneal inlay does not induce a permanent change in CH or CRF. A transient increase in both was seen in the early postoperative period. [J Refract Surg. 2014;30(12):831-836.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 12/2014; 30(12):831-6.
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    ABSTRACT: To describe LASIK flap amputation as a therapeutic option for patients with atypical refractory flap complications. Case series and literature review. Seven eyes of 6 patients underwent flap amputation for various atypical indications, including non-infectious flap/interface opacity (3 patients), irregular astigmatism on the flap surface (3 patients), and chronic pain (concurrent in 2 patients with irregular astigmatism). In each case, conservative measures were ineffective. All patients had symptomatic improvement and improved corrected visual function after amputation; however, uncorrected distance visual acuity worsened in 2 patients, manifest refraction worsened in 3 patients, and irregular astigmatism increased in 2 patients. Flap amputation is a reasonable alternative to improve corrected acuity in select cases with significant flap opacities or irregular astigmatism unresponsive to conservative measures, but uncorrected acuity and irregular astigmatism may worsen and should be discussed during the informed consent process. [J Refract Surg. 20XX;XX(X):XX-XX.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the efficacy and safety of early one-step transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) with mitomycin C as treatment for buttonhole formation during LASIK.
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To review the published literature describing the use of the LenSx femtosecond laser technology (Alcon Laboratories, Inc., Fort Worth, TX) in cataract surgery.
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 11/2014; 30(11):730-740.
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    ABSTRACT: To report initial clinical results of transepithelial corneal collagen cross-linking with iontophoresis (I-CXL).
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 11/2014; 30(11):746-753.
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    ABSTRACT: To assess efficacy, safety, predictability, and patient satisfaction after refractive lens exchange with a new refractive rotational asymmetric multifocal intraocular lens.
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 11/2014; 30(11):770-776.
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    ABSTRACT: To compare visual outcome, higher-order aberrations, and corneal asphericity (Q value) between wavefront-guided and aspheric LASIK for myopia and myopic astigmatism.
    Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 11/2014; 30(11):777-784.
  • Journal of refractive surgery (Thorofare, N.J.: 1995) 11/2014; 30(11):728.