Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology Journal Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Elsevier

Journal description

The Annals of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology is a scholarly medical journal published monthly by the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. The purpose of the Annals is to serve as an objective, scientific forum for the allergy/immunology specialist to keep up-to-date on current clinical research in the fields of allergy, asthma, and immunology. The emphasis of the journal will be to provide information that is readily applicable to both the clinician and the researcher. Each issue of the Annals shall also provide opportunities to participate in accredited continuing medical education activities to enhance overall clinical proficiency.

Current impact factor: 2.75

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 2.746
2012 Impact Factor 3.449
2011 Impact Factor 2.833
2010 Impact Factor 2.801
2009 Impact Factor 2.457
2008 Impact Factor 2.353
2007 Impact Factor 2.221
2006 Impact Factor 2.254
2005 Impact Factor 1.987
2004 Impact Factor 1.791
2003 Impact Factor 2.181
2002 Impact Factor 1.67
2001 Impact Factor 2.094
2000 Impact Factor 1.889
1999 Impact Factor 1.842
1998 Impact Factor 1.674
1997 Impact Factor 1.546

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 2.78
Cited half-life 7.10
Immediacy index 0.43
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.83
Website Annals of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology website
Other titles Annals of allergy, asthma, & immunology, Annals of allergy, asthma and immunology
ISSN 1081-1206
OCLC 31908795
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) in machinists is a chronic interstitial lung disease associated with exposures to in-use metal working fluid, particularly fluid contaminated with nontuberculous mycobacteria species Mycobacterium immunogenum (MI). [1], [2] and [3] In this context, MI also has been shown to induce HP-like pathology in mice. 4 The general assumption has been that preformed antigens (and not a live infection) are responsible for inducing HP. However, a recent clinical study reported culturing of MI from the sputum of a metalworker. 5 Our recent study using a murine alveolar macrophage cell line demonstrated that MI can multiply intracellularly and induce inflammatory mediators implicated in HP. 6 Hence, machinists repeatedly exposed to the inciting mycobacterial antigens, preformed or generated de novo during infection, are at risk for developing HP.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 08/2015; 114(6). DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2015.03.005
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Asthma education reimbursement continues to be an issue in the United States. Among the greatest barriers is the lack of a standardized curriculum for asthma self-management education recognized by a physician society, non-physician health care professional society or association, or other appropriate source. The applicable Current Procedural Terminology codes for self-management education and training are 98960 through 98962, stating that “if a practitioner has created a training curriculum for educating patients on management of their medical condition, he or she may employ a non-physician health care professional to provide education using a standardized curriculum for patients with that disease.” Without a standardized curriculum, reimbursement from payers is beyond reach.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 03/2015; 114(3):178-186. DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2014.12.014
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Clothing is largely presumed as being the mechanism by which house dust mites are distributed among locations in homes, yet little research to date has investigated the capacity with which various clothing fabric types serve as vectors for their accumulation and dispersal. Although previous research has indicated that car seats provide a habitat for mite populations, dynamics involved in the transfer of mites to clothing via car seat material is still unknown.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 02/2015; 114(4). DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2014.12.021
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 01/2015; 114(1):1-2. DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2014.10.021
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Omalizumab, an anti-IgE monoclonal antibody, is administered by injection once or twice monthly in offices and clinics. It offers a potential alternative intervention for patients with allergic asthma that is not well controlled because of recalcitrant poor adherence to inhaled corticosteroid therapy. To assess the effect of omalizumab therapy by measuring airway responsiveness to adenosine, a marker of allergic airway inflammation, and resource use. Patients (N = 17) aged 6 to 26 years (mean age, 16.4 years) with poorly controlled persistent allergic asthma, less than 50% adherence to inhaled corticosteroid therapy, a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of 60% predicted or higher, and adenosine provocation concentration that caused a decrease in FEV1 of 20% (PC20) of 60 mg/mL or less were randomized to receive 4 months of omalizumab or placebo in a double-blind, crossover trial with a 3- to 4-month washout between treatments. Patients were instructed to continue taking inhaled corticosteroids throughout the study. The PC20 was measured before and after each period. Fifteen patients completed the study. The mean baseline PC20 was 14.1 mg/mL (95% CI, 10.8-18.4 mg/mL). The fold change PC20 was 0.9 (95% CI, 0.5-1.7) during placebo and 3.1 (95% CI, 1.6-6.2) during omalizumab treatment; the estimated ratio was 3.4 (95% CI, 1.2-9.3; P = .02). Six patients required one or more short courses of oral corticosteroids for asthma exacerbations during placebo, but none required this intervention during omalizumab. During the study, the median prescription refills for inhaled corticosteroids was 0.15 (95% CI, 0.00-0.33) canisters per month. Omalizumab therapy is an alternative for patients with more severe poorly controlled asthma in whom adherence does not improve with conventional interventions. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00133042. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 01/2015; 114(1):58-62.e2. DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2014.10.012
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Little is known about the role of genetic and environmental modifiers in atopic march. To investigate the effects of filaggrin (FLG) P478S polymorphisms and environmental factors on the risk of asthma in a cohort of children with atopic dermatitis (AD). In 2010, 3,246 children from Childhood Environment and Allergic Diseases Cohort Study cohort were recruited. There were 485 children with AD who were invited for further clinical evaluation. Environmental exposures and skin prick tests for allergens were collected at 3 years of age and the development of asthma was determined at 6 years. Multivariate logistic regressions were performed to estimate the association between genetic and environmental factors and the development asthma in children with AD. Of 397 children with AD who completed the follow-up, 97 developed asthma. After controlling for potential confounders, only mite sensitizations (odds ratio 1.89, 95% confidence interval 1.10-3.25) and the FLG TT genotype (odds ratio 2.26, 95% confidence interval 1.33-3.84) were significantly associated with the development of asthma in children with AD. Mite sensitizations and FLG variants had a synergistic effect on the development of asthma. When children with FLG variants were exposed to mite, the risk for asthma was compounded compared with those with FLG variants without mite exposure (odds ratio 3.58, 95% confidence interval 1.81-7.08). Mite sensitization and the FLG TT genotype couldt be associated with the development of atopic march. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 01/2015; 114(1):52-57. DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2014.10.019
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 01/2015; 114(1):6-11. DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2014.08.016
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 01/2015; 114(1):A11. DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2014.11.008
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    ABSTRACT: Bee-gathered pollen is increasingly consumed around the world because of its purported nutritive and therapeutic values. Although rare, ingested pollens can induce severe adverse reactions, particularly in allergic individuals. These risks are exacerbated by the fact that products sold as “bee pollen” are made up of variable content, making them difficult to characterize and standardize.The present letter is aimed at clarifying the relation between the main plants used as pollen sources by honeybees and most allergenic airborne pollen grains.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 01/2015; 114(3). DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2014.11.009
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 01/2015; 114(3). DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2014.12.004
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Asthma prevalence has doubled in developed countries during the past 30 years. Pre- and perinatal events are essential in shaping the development of the immune system and systemic antibiotic use during this time could alter the maternal or placental microbiome, leading to an increase in the child's risk of developing asthma. To determine whether prenatal antibiotic use is associated with asthma and wheezing in children at risk for asthma. Using data from a randomized education intervention of families at risk for asthma from 1998 followed through 2009 in urban Chicago, asthma was defined as ever having a physician asthma diagnosis by year 3 and wheezing in the third year. Logistic regression models controlling for confounders investigated the effect of antibiotic use during pregnancy on these outcomes. After adjustment, prenatal antibiotic use was a risk factor for asthma (odds ratio 3.1, 95% confidence interval 1.4-6.8) but was only weakly associated with wheezing (odds ratio 1.8, 95% confidence interval 0.9-3.3). Analyses of the effects of timing of prenatal antibiotic use on asthma and wheezing showed the relation remained consistent for antibiotic use later in pregnancy, but the outcomes were not associated with antibiotic use in the first trimester. This study suggests prenatal antibiotic use might be associated with the development of asthma in children at risk for asthma. Although the relation with prenatal antibiotics does not hold for wheezing in this study, there might be a trend that could be delineated further within a larger cohort study. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014; 114(3). DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2014.11.014
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The responsiveness to a nonendemic grass species is unknown and cannot be research without an allergen challenge chamber. To determine the clinical responsiveness to timothy grass pollen (TGP) in participants without known natural exposure in an allergen challenge chamber (ACC). Of the 26 screened participants, 22 met screening criteria and completed the 2 chamber exposures. The study consisted of an initial screening visit that included a blood draw for serum specific IgE (ssIGE) to Bermuda grass pollen and TGP followed by a 4½-day run-in phase and two 3-hour ACC exposure visits. This study was performed early in the first week of December 2013, when no seasonal pollens were detected in San Antonio, Texas. Symptom scores were recorded at baseline and every 30 minutes. Of the 26 screened participants, 22 met the screening criteria and completed the 2 chamber exposures. Thirteen participants had always lived in South Texas without natural exposure, and 9 had previously lived in areas with TGP exposure. All participants tested positive to TGP and Bermuda grass pollen. Twelve and 13 of 22 had positive ssIgE test results to Timothy and Bermuda allergens, respectively, with 11 having positive results for both allergens. There were strong correlations among skin prick test size, a positive ssIgE test result, and high symptoms from TGP exposure. There was little difference in symptoms between those who had lived their entire lives in South Texas and those who had lived elsewhere. In Texas, where exposure to TGP is minimal, strongly positive SPT and ssIgE test results were predictors of high symptoms to TGP exposure. Never exposed participants in South Texas reacted to TGP similar to those who had previous natural exposure, suggesting that in vivo cross-reactivity may be higher than predicted by prior in vitro data and may allow the use in clinical trials of allergens not endemic to the locale of an ACC. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014; 114(3). DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2014.11.006
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014; 114(2). DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2014.11.004
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014; 114(2). DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2014.10.023
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014; 114(3). DOI:10.1016/j.anai.2014.11.010