Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology (ANN ALLERG ASTHMA IM )

Publisher: American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

Description

The Annals of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology is a scholarly medical journal published monthly by the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. The purpose of the Annals is to serve as an objective, scientific forum for the allergy/immunology specialist to keep up-to-date on current clinical research in the fields of allergy, asthma, and immunology. The emphasis of the journal will be to provide information that is readily applicable to both the clinician and the researcher. Each issue of the Annals shall also provide opportunities to participate in accredited continuing medical education activities to enhance overall clinical proficiency.

Impact factor 2.75

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    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    2.78
  • Cited half-life
    7.10
  • Immediacy index
    0.43
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.83
  • Website
    Annals of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology website
  • Other titles
    Annals of allergy, asthma, & immunology, Annals of allergy, asthma and immunology
  • ISSN
    1081-1206
  • OCLC
    31908795
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 01/2015; 114(1):A11.
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    ABSTRACT: Omalizumab, an anti-IgE monoclonal antibody, is administered by injection once or twice monthly in offices and clinics. It offers a potential alternative intervention for patients with allergic asthma that is not well controlled because of recalcitrant poor adherence to inhaled corticosteroid therapy. To assess the effect of omalizumab therapy by measuring airway responsiveness to adenosine, a marker of allergic airway inflammation, and resource use. Patients (N = 17) aged 6 to 26 years (mean age, 16.4 years) with poorly controlled persistent allergic asthma, less than 50% adherence to inhaled corticosteroid therapy, a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of 60% predicted or higher, and adenosine provocation concentration that caused a decrease in FEV1 of 20% (PC20) of 60 mg/mL or less were randomized to receive 4 months of omalizumab or placebo in a double-blind, crossover trial with a 3- to 4-month washout between treatments. Patients were instructed to continue taking inhaled corticosteroids throughout the study. The PC20 was measured before and after each period. Fifteen patients completed the study. The mean baseline PC20 was 14.1 mg/mL (95% CI, 10.8-18.4 mg/mL). The fold change PC20 was 0.9 (95% CI, 0.5-1.7) during placebo and 3.1 (95% CI, 1.6-6.2) during omalizumab treatment; the estimated ratio was 3.4 (95% CI, 1.2-9.3; P = .02). Six patients required one or more short courses of oral corticosteroids for asthma exacerbations during placebo, but none required this intervention during omalizumab. During the study, the median prescription refills for inhaled corticosteroids was 0.15 (95% CI, 0.00-0.33) canisters per month. Omalizumab therapy is an alternative for patients with more severe poorly controlled asthma in whom adherence does not improve with conventional interventions. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00133042. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 01/2015; 114(1):58-62.e2.
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    ABSTRACT: Bee-gathered pollen is increasingly consumed around the world because of its purported nutritive and therapeutic values. Although rare, ingested pollens can induce severe adverse reactions, particularly in allergic individuals. These risks are exacerbated by the fact that products sold as “bee pollen” are made up of variable content, making them difficult to characterize and standardize.The present letter is aimed at clarifying the relation between the main plants used as pollen sources by honeybees and most allergenic airborne pollen grains.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 01/2015;
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 01/2015; 114(1):1-2.
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about the role of genetic and environmental modifiers in atopic march. To investigate the effects of filaggrin (FLG) P478S polymorphisms and environmental factors on the risk of asthma in a cohort of children with atopic dermatitis (AD). In 2010, 3,246 children from Childhood Environment and Allergic Diseases Cohort Study cohort were recruited. There were 485 children with AD who were invited for further clinical evaluation. Environmental exposures and skin prick tests for allergens were collected at 3 years of age and the development of asthma was determined at 6 years. Multivariate logistic regressions were performed to estimate the association between genetic and environmental factors and the development asthma in children with AD. Of 397 children with AD who completed the follow-up, 97 developed asthma. After controlling for potential confounders, only mite sensitizations (odds ratio 1.89, 95% confidence interval 1.10-3.25) and the FLG TT genotype (odds ratio 2.26, 95% confidence interval 1.33-3.84) were significantly associated with the development of asthma in children with AD. Mite sensitizations and FLG variants had a synergistic effect on the development of asthma. When children with FLG variants were exposed to mite, the risk for asthma was compounded compared with those with FLG variants without mite exposure (odds ratio 3.58, 95% confidence interval 1.81-7.08). Mite sensitization and the FLG TT genotype couldt be associated with the development of atopic march. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 01/2015; 114(1):52-57.
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 01/2015; 114(1):6-11.
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    ABSTRACT: The responsiveness to a nonendemic grass species is unknown and cannot be research without an allergen challenge chamber. To determine the clinical responsiveness to timothy grass pollen (TGP) in participants without known natural exposure in an allergen challenge chamber (ACC). Of the 26 screened participants, 22 met screening criteria and completed the 2 chamber exposures. The study consisted of an initial screening visit that included a blood draw for serum specific IgE (ssIGE) to Bermuda grass pollen and TGP followed by a 4½-day run-in phase and two 3-hour ACC exposure visits. This study was performed early in the first week of December 2013, when no seasonal pollens were detected in San Antonio, Texas. Symptom scores were recorded at baseline and every 30 minutes. Of the 26 screened participants, 22 met the screening criteria and completed the 2 chamber exposures. Thirteen participants had always lived in South Texas without natural exposure, and 9 had previously lived in areas with TGP exposure. All participants tested positive to TGP and Bermuda grass pollen. Twelve and 13 of 22 had positive ssIgE test results to Timothy and Bermuda allergens, respectively, with 11 having positive results for both allergens. There were strong correlations among skin prick test size, a positive ssIgE test result, and high symptoms from TGP exposure. There was little difference in symptoms between those who had lived their entire lives in South Texas and those who had lived elsewhere. In Texas, where exposure to TGP is minimal, strongly positive SPT and ssIgE test results were predictors of high symptoms to TGP exposure. Never exposed participants in South Texas reacted to TGP similar to those who had previous natural exposure, suggesting that in vivo cross-reactivity may be higher than predicted by prior in vitro data and may allow the use in clinical trials of allergens not endemic to the locale of an ACC. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Asthma prevalence has doubled in developed countries during the past 30 years. Pre- and perinatal events are essential in shaping the development of the immune system and systemic antibiotic use during this time could alter the maternal or placental microbiome, leading to an increase in the child's risk of developing asthma. To determine whether prenatal antibiotic use is associated with asthma and wheezing in children at risk for asthma. Using data from a randomized education intervention of families at risk for asthma from 1998 followed through 2009 in urban Chicago, asthma was defined as ever having a physician asthma diagnosis by year 3 and wheezing in the third year. Logistic regression models controlling for confounders investigated the effect of antibiotic use during pregnancy on these outcomes. After adjustment, prenatal antibiotic use was a risk factor for asthma (odds ratio 3.1, 95% confidence interval 1.4-6.8) but was only weakly associated with wheezing (odds ratio 1.8, 95% confidence interval 0.9-3.3). Analyses of the effects of timing of prenatal antibiotic use on asthma and wheezing showed the relation remained consistent for antibiotic use later in pregnancy, but the outcomes were not associated with antibiotic use in the first trimester. This study suggests prenatal antibiotic use might be associated with the development of asthma in children at risk for asthma. Although the relation with prenatal antibiotics does not hold for wheezing in this study, there might be a trend that could be delineated further within a larger cohort study. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014;
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014;
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014;
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014;
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: No large, prospective, epidemiologic study has investigated the association between diesel exhaust particle (DEP) exposure and early aeroallergen sensitization and allergic rhinitis (AR) at 4 years of age. To determine how exposure to traffic exhaust during infancy is associated with aeroallergen sensitization and AR at 4 years of age and the predictive utility of the wheal area at 1 to 3 years of age on AR at 4 years of age. Infants born to aeroallergen sensitized parents were evaluated annually with skin prick tests to 15 aeroallergens with measurement of wheal areas. At 4 years of age, AR was defined as at least one positive aeroallergen skin prick test result and the presence of sneezing and a runny nose without a cold or flu. Infant (DEP) exposure was estimated using data from 27 air sampling monitors and a land use regression model. Complete data were available for 634 children at 4 years of age. Prevalence of AR increased annually from 6.9% to 21.9%. A positive trend was observed for high DEP exposure and aeroallergen sensitization at 2 and 3 years of age (odds ratio, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.97-2.0) and (odds ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-1.85) but not with AR. At 2 years of age, every 1-mm(2) increase in the wheal area of timothy and Alternaria significantly increased the odds of AR at 4 years of age. At 3 years of age, every 1-mm(2) increase in the wheal area of fescue, dog, and Penicillium significantly increased the odds of AR at 4 years of age. DEP exposure enhances the risk of early aeroallergen sensitization. Aeroallergen wheal area at 2 and 3 years of age is associated with AR at 4 years of age. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014;
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014;
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Living with food allergy has been found to adversely affect quality of life. Previous studies of the psychosocial impact of food allergy on caregivers have focused on mothers. To describe differences in food allergy-related quality of life (FAQOL) and empowerment of mothers and fathers of a large cohort of children with food allergy. Eight hundred seventy-six families of children with food allergy were studied. Food allergy was defined by stringent criteria, including reaction history, skin prick testing, and specific IgE. Parental empowerment and FAQOL were assessed by the adapted Family Empowerment and FAQOL-Parental Burden scales. Parental scores were compared by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Multiple regression models examined the association of parental empowerment with FAQOL. Mothers reported greater empowerment (P < .001) and lower FAQOL (P < .001) compared with fathers, regardless of allergen severity, type, or comorbidities. However, parental empowerment was not significantly associated with FAQOL for mothers or fathers. Although parents of children with peanut, cow milk, egg, and tree nut allergies were similarly empowered, milk and egg allergies were associated with lower FAQOL (P < .01). Parental concern in the QOL assessment was greatest for items involving fear of allergen exposure outside the home. Parental empowerment and FAQOL vary significantly among mothers and fathers of children with food allergy. Greater effects on FAQOL were seen for milk and egg compared with other food allergies. Although parents of children with food allergy might be empowered to care for their child, they continue to experience impaired FAQOL owing to fears of allergen exposure beyond their control. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Effective patient-physician communication is the key component of the patient-physician relationship. To assess the proportion of ever-employed adults with current asthma who talked about asthma associated with work with their physician or other health professional and to identify factors associated with this communication. The 2006 to 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Asthma Call-Back Survey data from 40 states and the District of Columbia for ever-employed adults (≥18 years old) with current asthma (N = 50,433) were examined. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with communication with a health professional about asthma and work. Among ever-employed adults with current asthma, 9.1% were ever told by a physician that their asthma was related to any job they ever had and 11.7% ever told a physician or other health professional that this was the case. When responses to the 2 questions were combined, the proportion of those who communicated with a health professional about asthma and work was 14.7%. Communication with a health professional about asthma and work was associated with age, race or ethnicity, employment, education, income, insurance, and urgent treatment for worsening asthma. A small proportion of patients with asthma might communicate with a health professional about asthma associated with work. Future studies should examine whether patients with asthma ever discussed with a health professional the possibility that their asthma might be related to work to provide information on the frequency of patient-clinician communication about asthma related to work. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014;
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014;
  • Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2014;