Liver transplantation and surgery: official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society (Liver Transplant Surg)

Publisher: American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases; International Liver Transplantation Society, Wiley

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Other titles Liver transplantation and surgery (Online), Liver transplantation
ISSN 1074-3022
OCLC 44198906
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Wiley

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    • Reviewed 18/03/14
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  • Classification
    ‚Äč yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEHE) is a rare tumor with an unpredictable course and prognosis. The aim of this study is to describe our experience with liver resection, as well as transplantation, in the treatment of this tumor. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical features, pathological findings, and postoperative results in a series of 11 patients presenting between 1990 and 1998. Five patients (45%) presented with abdominal pain, 3 patients (27%) with jaundice and ascites, and the rest were asymptomatic. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging showed localized lesions in 2 patients (18%) and multifocal disease in the others. Seven patients (64%) had extrahepatic lesions, detected either by preoperative imaging or discovered at exploration. Two resections of apparently localized lesions were followed by rapid and aggressive recurrence. Five patients were treated with transplantation, including 1 patient who had previously undergone resection. Of these 5 patients, 2 patients are currently free of detectable disease, 1 patient who had severe ascites and jaundice is now asymptomatic with stable extrahepatic lesions, and 2 patients (including 1 who had previously undergone a resection) died of tumor recurrence. One patient with advanced tumor died while waiting for transplantation. The remaining 4 patients are free of symptoms and have stable hepatic and extrahepatic disease. HEHE is nearly always multifocal, and our results with resection were dismal. Because of the unpredictable nature of the tumor, the indications for transplantation in patients without liver-related symptoms should be carefully evaluated. Nevertheless, extrahepatic disease should not be an absolute contraindication for liver transplantation in patients with severe liver dysfunction.
    Liver transplantation and surgery: official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society 12/1999; 5(6):526-31.
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    ABSTRACT: Tacrolimus is an effective immunosuppressant in the rescue of liver allograft patients in whom conventional immunosuppression failed. Efficacy and safety were examined in a multicenter trial of liver transplant recipients converted to tacrolimus because of rejection despite cyclosporine (CyA) therapy or intolerance to CyA. Six hundred seventy-seven patients were enrolled onto the study; 475 patients for rejection, 197 patients for intolerance, and 5 patients treated compassionately. The mean daily dose of tacrolimus was less in the intolerance (Int) patients throughout the study: 0.22 versus 0.17 mg/kg at 1 week and 0.14 versus 0.11 mg/kg at 24 months in rejection (Rej) and Int patients, respectively. Mean blood levels paralleled dosing in both groups, but were greater in the Rej patients (10.7 v 8.3 ng/mL at 18 months). Kaplan-Meier estimates of patient and graft survival were similar in the two groups. Patient survival rates were 80.1% and 81.5%, and graft survival rates were 72.7% and 73.9% at 24 months in the Rej and Int patients, respectively. Most adverse events occurred with a similar incidence in the two groups. Those with a 4% or greater incidence were fever, viral hepatitis, and pneumonia. The incidence of sepsis, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, kidney failure, and convulsion was greater in the Int group. The incidence of abnormal liver function test results, hyperglycemia, headache, and abnormal kidney function was greater in the Rej group. Mean liver function test results decreased with time postrescue in both groups. Mean serum creatinine level increased from baseline to 18 months postrescue in both groups (1.44 to 1.51 mg/dL for Int patients, 1.14 to 1.48 mg/dL for Rej patients). We conclude tacrolimus is safe and effective rescue in liver transplant recipients with rejection or CyA intolerance.
    Liver transplantation and surgery: official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society 12/1999; 5(6):502-8.
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    ABSTRACT: We describe our use of a liver allograft from a donor who died of intracranial hemorrhage after brodifacoum ingestion. Because brodifacoum can remain in the human body for months, the recipient's posttransplantation coagulation profiles and serum brodifacoum levels were monitored closely. Her posttransplantation course was excellent, with no coagulation problem. At 15 months posttransplantation, she is well, with normal liver function and coagulation profile. We conclude that brodifacoum toxicity is not a strict contraindication to liver donation.
    Liver transplantation and surgery: official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society 12/1999; 5(6):509-11.
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    ABSTRACT: Bromfenac, a nonnarcotic analgesic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was associated with reversible, minor elevations in serum aminotransferase levels during clinical trials. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical, laboratory, and histological features of 4 patients with severe bromfenac hepatotoxicity identified at 3 tertiary care centers participating in the US Acute Liver Failure Study Group. Bromfenac was administered for chronic musculoskeletal disorders to 4 women in therapeutic doses of 25 to 100 mg/d for a minimum of 90 days. All patients reported a prodrome of malaise and fatigue and presented with severe, symptomatic hepatocellular injury with associated hypoprothrombinemia. None of the subjects had underlying liver or kidney disease, and there was no evidence of a hypersensitivity reaction. Other identifiable causes of acute liver failure were uniformly excluded. Despite supportive measures, all the subjects developed progressive liver failure over 5 to 37 days, leading to emergency liver transplantation in 3 patients and death in 1 patient while awaiting transplantation. Extensive confluent parenchymal necrosis that appeared to begin in the central zones and was accompanied by a predominantly lymphocytic infiltrate was noted in all the livers examined. Nodular regeneration was seen in the 2 patients with a more protracted clinical course. Administration of therapeutic doses of bromfenac for greater than 90 days was associated with the development of acute liver failure leading to liver transplantation or death in 4 adult women. The poor outcomes observed in this series, coupled with the inability to identify individuals at risk for severe, idiosyncratic bromfenac hepatotoxicity, preclude further use of bromfenac in the medical community.
    Liver transplantation and surgery: official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society 12/1999; 5(6):480-4.
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    ABSTRACT: We report a successful living related liver transplantation from a donor with von Willebrand's disease. With proper preparation, a substantial liver resection can be performed safely in such patients, and the transplanted liver will function normally.
    Liver transplantation and surgery: official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society 11/1999; 5(6):532-3. DOI:10.1002/lt.500050609
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    ABSTRACT: The occurrence of acute cellular rejection after orthotopic liver transplantation is common. At present, no allowance is made in immunosuppressive regimens for parameters other than weight. We investigated parameters in 121 consecutive patients receiving their primary allograft to determine if there are pretransplantation factors predicting the occurrence of acute cellular rejection after transplantation. The case notes and dietetic notes of these patients were reviewed for age at transplantation, cause of liver disease, preoperative albumin and creatinine levels, lymphocyte count, anthropometric measurements, donor age, HLA DR mismatch, and cold ischemia time. Acute cellular rejection was more likely to occur in younger patients, patients with Child's class A disease, and those with normal midarm muscle circumference. Acute rejection was increased in transplant recipients from donors aged younger than 30 and older than 50 years. Acute cellular rejection was less likely to occur in patients who underwent transplantation for alcoholic liver disease. Chronic rejection was significantly increased in women and those patients who experienced recurrent acute rejection. On multivariate analysis, the only significant predictor was the decreased likelihood of acute rejection in patients with depleted midarm muscle circumference. In conclusion, it may be possible to individualize immunosuppressive regimens on the basis of pretransplantation characteristics.
    Liver transplantation and surgery: official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society 11/1999; 5(6):475-9. DOI:10.1002/lt.500050608
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic hepatic allograft rejection is characterized by the histological findings of ductopenia and a decreased number of hepatic arteries in portal tracts in the presence of foam cell (obliterative) arteriopathy. Recent studies have extended the histological spectrum of chronic rejection to include the presence of biliary epithelial atrophy or pyknosis involving the majority of small ducts present in the liver biopsy specimen. Overall, the incidence of chronic rejection in adults appears to be decreasing and is currently approximately 4%. However, the incidence of chronic rejection in pediatric liver transplant recipients has been more stable and ranges from 8% to 12% in most studies. Clinical risk factors associated with chronic rejection include: underlying liver disease, HLA donor-recipient matching, positive lymphocytotoxic cross-match, cytomegalovirus infection, recipient age, donor-recipient ethnic origin, male donor into female recipient, number of acute rejection episodes, histological severity of acute rejection episodes, low cyclosporine trough levels, and retransplantation for chronic rejection. Chronic rejection, once diagnosed, frequently leads to graft failure; however, a number of reports indicated 20% to 30% of the patients with this diagnosis may respond to additional immunosuppressive therapy or even resolve spontaneously receiving baseline immunosuppression. Newer immunosuppressive agents, such as tacrolimus and mycophenolate, may successfully reverse chronic rejection, particularly when it is diagnosed in its early histological stages.
    Liver transplantation and surgery: official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society 09/1999; 5(5):388-400. DOI:10.1002/lt.500050519
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    ABSTRACT: This article examines the scientific, technical, and administrative barriers to splitting donor livers for use in two adults. The main scientific barrier is that cadaveric donor livers at their current level of postoperative function are not sufficiently large to support life in two adult recipients. However, glycogenation of livers from young donors may be a method to overcome this problem in the short term. The three technical obstacles to splitting the liver in the midplane are anatomic anomalies that complicate or prevent splitting, the means to detect these anomalies, and the surgical methods to accomplish the split. Anatomic anomalies affecting the biliary drainage and arterial supply of the liver are the most important limiting technical factors. Administrative accommodations in the current methods of organ allocation will be needed if split-liver transplantation in adults is to succeed. A nationwide view of organ allocation requires that the total number of lives saved by the procedure be the priority outcome nationally. If liver transplantation is viewed from this perspective, split-liver transplantation for adults would be a high priority, and incentives should be set to encourage it.
    Liver transplantation and surgery: official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society 09/1999; 5(5):437-50. DOI:10.1002/lt.500050508
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    Liver transplantation and surgery: official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society 09/1999; 5(5):460-3. DOI:10.1002/lt.500050512
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    ABSTRACT: Recurrence of hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in an adult has never been reported. We describe a 23-year-old woman who initially underwent OLT because of debilitating and severe HPS associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Although the clinical resolution of HPS was well documented day 117 post-OLT, the reappearance of NASH was documented by liver biopsy. Severe hypoxemia because of recurrent HPS rapidly evolved beginning approximately day 700 post-OLT. Retransplantation was attempted, but the patient died post-OLT of sepsis and/or multiorgan failure.
    Liver transplantation and surgery: official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society 09/1999; 5(5):451-3. DOI:10.1002/lt.500050502
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    ABSTRACT: Infective endocarditis is a rare complication affecting solid-organ transplant recipients. Isolated pulmonic valve endocarditis is also rare. A case of persistent bacteremia secondary to an isolated pulmonic valve vegetation occurred in a woman 10 days after liver transplantation. A pulmonary vegetectomy was performed as an alternative to valve replacement in addition to long-term antibiotic therapy.
    Liver transplantation and surgery: official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society 09/1999; 5(5):456-7. DOI:10.1002/lt.500050509
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with end-stage liver disease have low bone-turnover osteoporosis, and there is often further bone loss of 20% to 30% after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Bone recovery after OLT has been reported, but data are limited. We undertook studies to determine whether bone recovery continues in the long term. Twenty-eight adult patients alive at least 5 years after OLT were studied (14 men, 14 women). Bone mineral density (BMD), serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), osteocalcin, and vitamin D levels were measured pretransplantation, at 3 months, 12 months, a mean of 46 months, and a mean of 85 months (range, 63 to 117 months) after transplantation. When BMD is expressed as a z score, the results were as follows: x0.82 +/- 0.22 pre-OLT; -2.04 +/- 0.27 at 3 months; -1.68 +/- 0.24 at 12 months; -1.23 +/- 0.24 at a mean of 46 months; and -1.0 +/- 0.26 at a mean of 85 months after OLT. The results at 46 and 85 months were significantly greater than the measurement at 3 months after OLT (P <.05). Furthermore, mean BMD (expressed as a z score) returns to the pre-OLT level at a mean of 85 months. At final follow-up, 9 of 28 patients had elevated PTH levels, and 14 of 27 patients had elevated osteocalcin levels. Five patients had spontaneous fractures in the first 12 months after transplantation, and 5 more patients had fractures by final follow-up. Even at 7 years after OLT, there was a significant increase in BMD (expressed as a z score) compared with 3 months after transplantation. Elevation of serum PTH and osteocalcin levels in some patients suggests continuing bone remodeling.
    Liver transplantation and surgery: official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society 09/1999; 5(5):407-13. DOI:10.1002/lt.500050507