Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology (J Theor Phil Psychol )

Publisher: American Psychological Association

Description

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
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  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
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  • Article influence
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  • ISSN
    1068-8471
  • OCLC
    313232002
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

American Psychological Association

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print on a web-site
    • Pre-print must be labeled with date and accompanied with statement that paper has not (yet) been published
    • Copy of authors final peer-reviewed manuscript as accepted for publication
    • Post-print on author's web-site or employers server only, after acceptance
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to APA journal home page or article DOI
    • Article must include the following statement: 'This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.'
    • Publisher version cannot be used
    • APA will submit NIH author articles to PubMed Central, after author completion of form
    • Wellcome Trust authors may comply using Paid Option.
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 01/2013;
  • Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 01/2013; 33(3):135-140.
  • Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 11/2012; 32(4):241-229.
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    ABSTRACT: The phenomenological perspective described by M. Merleau-Ponty seems to be emerging in the context of contemporary developmental research, theories of communication, metaphor theory, and cognitive neuroscience. This emergence is not always accompanied by reference to Merleau-Ponty, however, or appropriate interpretation. On some cases, the emergence of the perspective seems rather inadvertent. The purpose of this essay is to ferret out some of the points which contemporary thinking has in common with Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology. Though it may appear that the examples chosen for this essay might be scrutinized separately, the thread that ties them together is Merleau-Ponty's work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(2):140-166.
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    ABSTRACT: Reviews the book, The cultural psychology of the self by Ciaran Benson (see record 2001-00374-000). This is a book rich in insight, deep in significance and, inevitably, marked by assumptions and interpretations subject to gentle disagreement. It is precisely because of its manifest assets that points of disagreement need to be highlighted. In this review I will address criticism only to the first half of the book, the criticism being more by way of an introduction to the issue than the suggestion of a settled position on it. I confine criticism to the first half not because of limited space. Rather, the foundational chapters on which the balance of the book's arguments depend are given in Part I. Part II then stands as an elevated and elevating "applied psychology of the self" resting on these very substantive and theoretical foundations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(2):225-230.
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    ABSTRACT: Moral judgment and behavior are uniquely resistant to psychological analysis because morality generally is defined in terms that do not admit of psychological predication. Principal among these is the idea of freedom. An agent can act morally only on the condition that it is also free to do otherwise. The respective theoretical premises of C. Sunstein (1997) and E. Brunswik (1966) are contrasted in order to suggest that Brunswikian theory constitutes a distinct and highly promising new approach to the psychology of moral judgment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(2):196-207.
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    ABSTRACT: The distinction between objective and subjective knowledge has a long philosophical history, but the modem version has ties to Hume's separation of reason and belief. The extraction of reason from mere habits of the mind raises its own problems concerning the possibility of knowledge (via the problem of induction). These problems are especially acute within the therapeutic context. Indeed, the inclusion of morals in psychotherapy is considered unethical. This arises from the assumption that morality is idiosyncratic and subjective whereas scientific knowledge is objective and thus closer to truth. The argument developed here is that the therapeutic endeavor is implicitly philosophical and civic in its assumptions. As such it requires the resources of moral and political philosophy as well as a standard by which to assess its achievements. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(1):25-35.
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    ABSTRACT: Linguistic concepts allow us to break our world into intelligible parts. William James warns, however, that conceptualizing can easily turn into "vicious intellectualism." This happens when words (concepts) subsume unique particulars under one name, a quality is abstracted from the many particulars, the two are contrasted vis-á-vis, and then the abstraction is declared independent of, temporally prior to, and causally related to the events or processes from which it was derived. Psychology has committed this logical fallacy with concepts such as emotions, personality, and mental illness. To mistake these concepts for "thing like" entities that produce behavior is intellectually forgetful given their linguistic origin. The work of Emmanuel Levinas, Charles Taylor, and C. Terry Warner, among others, will be used to provide an alternative theory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(1):61-75.
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    ABSTRACT: Reviews the book, The psychology of existence: An integrative, clinical perspective by Kirk Schneider and Rollo May (see record 1994-98741-000). In light of what they see as a growing interest in existential psychology among training clinicians and researchers, Schneider and May have authored a text which introduces the existential movement and outlines clinical applications of existentialism in psychotherapy. The text's most significant contribution is the latter—the presentation of a guiding clinical framework for conducting the "existential- integrative approach" in psychotherapy. While many personality and psychotherapy texts include introductory chapters about existentialism, few discuss how therapy cases are conceptualized and conducted from an existential therapeutic orientation. This text is an important contribution to the clinical psychology training literature. In traditional clinical training programs, existential approaches to psychotherapy are often overlooked, because such approaches are viewed as purely philosophical rather than clinically applicable. Schneider and May challenge this view. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(1):80-86.
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    ABSTRACT: Reviews the book, Ethics and values in psychotherapy by Alan C. Tjeltveit (see record 1999-16017-000). Many psychologists are aware of the ethical and inescapably value-laden nature of psychotherapy (cf., Kurtines, Azmitia, & Gewirtz, 1992). Despite this awareness about values, however, much confusion persists about the nature and management of values in practice. Tjeltveit's text seeks to address such questions among many others. This fine book is one of the first works to comprehensively integrate the research regarding values inescapability with broader ethical theory and philosophy and its potential impact on psychology. In his extensive review, Tjeltveit explores the meaning of "psychotherapist as ethicist," the varied definitions of values, the relationship between science and ethics, the ethical nature of therapy goals and practice, and implications of these issues for public philosophy and professional ethics (p. 18). Tjeltveit's text is an extremely significant contribution to the discipline, because it is one of the first works to explicitly discuss the value-infused nature of psychotherapy and the consequences that this brings to individual practice, professional standards, and societal expectations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(2):231-239.
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    ABSTRACT: This article discusses the ideas of philosophy. A question posed by Socrates to the young Hippocrates has its contemporary application in the case of all who consider themselves professionally competent to engage the human personality, whether they call the object of their engagement the mind, the soul, or the psyche. When an individual suffering an existential crisis seeks the counsel of psychiatrist, psychotherapist, counselor, or philosophic practitioner, he places himself into a relation of trust; entrusting mind, soul, and psyche to the dialectical encounter. He expects that in so doing the practitioner represents something good and that the encounter will yield a good. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(1):36-51.
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    ABSTRACT: The relation between theory and practice is the object of a central debate in the history of science. In a recent contribution to the issue, L. E. Sandelands (see record 1991-11441-001) equates practice with G. Ryle's "knowing how" and theory with Ryle's "knowing that," arguing that practice and theory are incommensurate forms of knowing such that theory cannot be translated into practice. R. T. Craig (see record 1996-04965-004) took issue with Sandelands' position, pointing out that it reflects an academic approach removed from everyday social behavior in which problem solving is always both practical and theoretical. The authors agree and take this blurring of the theory/practice dichotomy as a cue to deconstruct the conception of two ways of knowing. J. Shotter's concepts of "joint action" and "knowing from within" suggest a third type of knowing which develops between knowers in particular contexts or circumstances. This third way of knowing has important implications for psychological training and inquiry. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(2):208-224.
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    ABSTRACT: This article critically evaluates S. Freud's (1917) Mourning and Melancholia and challenges both the celebratory and reactionary views that treat this essay as an ahistorical and decontextualized "foundation-stone" of depression. Although many biographies have been written on Freud, the possible influences on his thinking in the area grief and depression have not been examined. Moreover, no reviews have investigated Freud's understanding of mourning and melancholia from the perspective of his own experiences with these difficulties. Following a brief overview of Freud's seminal paper, the historical psychiatric views on depression and the influences on Freud's conceptualization of mourning and melancholia are briefly discussed. Finally, an exegesis of the contextual validity of this model is presented. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(2):167-195.
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    ABSTRACT: Presents the Presidential Address to the Division of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology (Division 24). In this address, the author discusses his current plans to tackle the practical issues of theoretical psychology instead of, as past presidents have done, pushing the already established conceptual envelope of theoretical psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(2):97-115.
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    ABSTRACT: Reviews the book, Martin Buber: The hidden dialogue by Dan Avnon (1998). In this exciting and instructive volume, the author carefully examines the main themes and thrusts of Martin Buber's radical philosophy of dialogue. In recent years it has become increasingly clear that Buber's vision of the basic nature of human existence is not only profound in its intellectual scope and sophistication, but also deeply disturbing in its moral and ethical implications. This fine book, however, seeks to redress this unfortunate shortcoming in the literature—and, all things considered, does a more than adequate job of it. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(2):242-243.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper examines several contemporary readings of Piaget's texts: M. Chapman's Constructive Evolution provides a wide-ranging exegesis of Piaget's entire body of work; F. Vidal's Piaget before Piaget focuses on Piaget's earliest writings; and H. Beilin's Piaget's New Theory concentrates on Piaget's very last projects. All three contend that in contrast to accepted versions of Piaget's theory, there is a relatively unknown Piaget and a markedly differently way to understand Genetic Epistemology. This brief review attempts to bracket such readings within the purview of postmodern concerns with rationality. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(1):52-60.
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    ABSTRACT: Within contemporary personality psychology there is widespread consensus that, at long last, the basic elements of "the" human personality have been empirically discovered, and that the systematic search for the underlying causes and consequences of personality differences can be pursued on this basis. The putatively basic trait dimensions are neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness, and are referred to collectively as "the Big Five." In the present article, this perspective on the psychology of personality is examined critically and found wanting. It is argued that neither the "Big Five" framework in particular nor trait "psychology" more generally is adequate as the basis for a scientific psychology of the human person. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(1):1-24.
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    ABSTRACT: This note brings together three phenomena leading to a tendency toward reductionism in cognitive psychology. They are (1) the reification of cognitive processes into an entity called mind; (2) the identification of the mind with the brain; and (3) the congruence by analogy of the brain with the digital computer. Also indicated is the need to continue studying the effects upon behavior of variables other than brain function. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10/2012; 20(2):116-121.
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    ABSTRACT: In defending the scientific legitimacy of ceteris paribus qualified causal generalizations, we situate and specify the reference of the ceteris paribus proviso within a fundamental causal framework consisting of causal agents, pathways of influence, mediators, moderators, and causal consequences. In so doing, we provide an explication of the reference and utility of the ceteris paribus proviso in terms of mediators and moderators as these constitute the range of factors that can impinge on the relation between cause and effect. We argue that the conceptual causal roadmap embodied by the ceteris paribus qualification serves as a schematic template for the ongoing identification of causally relevant factors and plays an indispensable heuristic role in advancing scientific inquiry into causal relations. We then provide guidelines for differentiating between acceptable and unacceptable uses of ceteris paribus and describe how mediators and moderators conceptually encompassed by the ceteris paribus proviso can be employed in evaluating the meaning and acceptability of proposed ceteris paribus causal generalizations, as well serve as a guide to investigators in the process of designing studies to identify a causal agent, mediators, moderators, pathways of influence, and causal consequences. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 07/2012; 32(3):180-190.

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