Physical review. E, Statistical physics, plasmas, fluids, and related interdisciplinary topics (Phys Rev E)

Publisher: American Physical Society; American Institute of Physics

Journal description

The subtitle of Physical Review E is Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics. PRE has two parts and sixteen subsections: Part 1: Soft Matter and Biological Physics: Statistical physics of soft matter; Equilibrium and linear transport properties of flluids; Granular materials; Colloidal dispersions, suspensions, and agregates; Structured and complex fluids; Films, interfaces, and crystal growth; Liquid crystals; Polymers; Biological Physics. Part 2: Chaos, Hydrodynamics, Plasmas, and Related Topics: General methods of statistical physics; Chaos and pattern formation; Nonlinear hydrodynamics and turbulence; Plasma physics; Physics of beams; Classical physics, including nonlinear media; Computational physics. Discontinued in 2001. Continued by Physical Review E - Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft matter Physics (1539-3755)

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Website Physical Review E - Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics website
Other titles Physical review. E, Statistical physics, plasmas, fluids, and related interdisciplinary topics, Statistical physics, plasmas, fluids, and related interdisciplinary topics
ISSN 1063-651X
OCLC 26103502
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We show that the mixed phase space dynamics of a typical smooth Hamiltonian system universally leads to a sustained exponential growth of energy at a slow periodic variation of parameters. We build a model for this process in terms of geometric Brownian motion with a positive drift, and relate it to the steady entropy increase after each period of the parameters variation.
    Physical review. E, Statistical physics, plasmas, fluids, and related interdisciplinary topics 01/2015; 91(1-1):010901(R). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevE.91.010901
  • Physical review. E, Statistical physics, plasmas, fluids, and related interdisciplinary topics 01/2015; 91(1):012140. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevE.91.012140
  • Physical review. E, Statistical physics, plasmas, fluids, and related interdisciplinary topics 09/2014; 90:033112.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recently the analysis of scattering patterns by angular cross-correlation analysis (CCA) was introduced to reveal the orientational order in disordered samples with special focus to future applications on x-ray free-electron laser facilities. We apply this CCA approach to ultra-small-angle light-scattering data obtained from two-dimensional monolayers of microspheres. The films were studied in addition by optical microscopy. This combined approach allows to calculate the cross-correlations of the scattering patterns, characterized by the orientational correlation function Ψ_{l}(q), as well as to obtain the real-space structure of the monolayers. We show that CCA is sensitive to the orientational order of monolayers formed by the microspheres which are not directly visible from the scattering patterns. By mixing microspheres of different radii the sizes of ordered monolayer domains is reduced. For these samples it is shown that Ψ_{l}(q) quantitatively describes the degree of hexagonal order of the two-dimensional films. The experimental CCA results are compared with calculations based on the microscopy images. Both techniques show qualitatively similar features. Differences can be attributed to the wave-front distortion of the laser beam in the experiment. This effect is discussed by investigating the effect of different wave fronts on the cross-correlation analysis results. The so-determined characteristics of the cross-correlation analysis will be also relevant for future x-ray-based studies.
    Physical review. E, Statistical physics, plasmas, fluids, and related interdisciplinary topics 07/2014; 90(1):012309. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevE.90.012309
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Neural field theory insights are used to derive effective brain connectivity matrices from the functional connectivity matrix defined by activity covariances. The symmetric case is exactly solved for a resting state system driven by white noise, in which strengths of connections, often termed effective connectivities, are inferred from functional data; these include strengths of connections that are underestimated or not detected by anatomical imaging. Proximity to criticality is calculated and found to be consistent with estimates obtainable from other methods. Links between anatomical, effective, and functional connectivity and resting state activity are quantified, with applicability to other complex networks. Proof-of-principle results are illustrated using published experimental data on anatomical connectivity and resting state functional connectivity. In particular, it is shown that functional connection matrices can be used to uncover the existence and strength of connections that are missed from anatomical connection matrices, including interhemispheric connections that are difficult to track with techniques such as diffusion spectrum imaging.
    Physical review. E, Statistical physics, plasmas, fluids, and related interdisciplinary topics 07/2014; 90(1):012707. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevE.90.012707