Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology (Neonatal Intensive Care J Perinatol Neonatol )

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  • Other titles
    Neonatal intensive care
  • ISSN
    1062-2454
  • OCLC
    21594833
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 01/2008; 21:20-26.
  • Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 05/2000; 13(3):26-28.
  • Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 01/1999; 12:14-17.
  • Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 05/1994; 7(2):14-7.
  • Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 01/1994; 7(3):14-6, 64.
  • Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 01/1994; 7(5):14-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Body fat (BF) is rarely determined routinely in infants due to the lack of a simple measuring device. A portable NIR instrument, successfully applied in adults, takes 5 seconds for a measurement and involves no skin manipulation. We designed this study 1) to compare BF estimates by NIR to skinfold thickness (ST) and 2) to assess the relationship of NIR and ST values with standard measures reflecting BF, such as Weight/Length Ratio, Body Mass Index and Ponderal Index. We studied BF in 40 healthy term infants within 12 hours of birth by NIR and ST at 3 standard sites: triceps (TRI), subscapular (SUB) and abdominal (ABD). RESULTS. Significant correlations were found between NIR and ST (R=0.70, 0.58 and 0.64 for SUB, TRI and ABD, respectively); between the sums of the 3 measurements (R= 0.69), and between birthweight and ST (R=0.57) or NIR (0.51), and between Weight/Length Ratio and ST (R=0.55) or NIR (R=0.51). We conclude that NIR measurements correlate well with skinfold measurements and NIR can be measured faster than skinfolds (5 vs 60 seconds). We speculate that NIR could be cost-effective for routine clinical measure of body fat and growth in infants.
    Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 01/1994; 7(5):28-30.
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    ABSTRACT: We studied the ability of a new pulse oximeter to detect hyperoxemia in neonates. One hundred arterial blood samples were obtained from umbilical artery catheters of 41 acutely ill neonates (birth weight 560-4100 grams) while SpO2 was simultaneously measured at a postductal site. The relationship between PaO2 and SpO2 was examined and expressed on a matrix. Hyperoxemia was defined as PaO2 greater than 90 mm Hg and upper alarm limit for pulse oximetry was set at 95%. The incidence of true hyperoxemia (PaO2 greater than 90 mm Hg, SpO2 greater than 95%) was determined and sensitivity and specificity for detection of hyperoxemia by the SpaceLabs device was calculated. Hyperoxemia was detected in eighteen samples with sixteen having SpO2 greater than 95% (89% sensitivity). In 82 samples having a PaO2 value less than or equal to 90 mm Hg, 53 were associated with SpO2 less than or equal to 95% (65% specificity). Among 55 samples with SpO2 less than or equal to 95% hyperoxemia occurred in only 2 (3.6%). Sensitivity of 95% would have been achieved with upper alarm limit set at 94%. The new pulse oximeter evaluated detected 89% of episodes of hyperoxemia with upper alarm limits set at 95% and 95% of episodes if upper limit was set at 94%. As previously reported, both individual device algorithms and upper alarm limits chosen determine ability of pulse oximeters to detect hyperoxemia.
    Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 01/1994; 7(3):42-5.
  • Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 01/1993; 6(5):54-8, 66.
  • Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 01/1993; 6(1):23-6.
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    ABSTRACT: Delivery of medications by some infusion devices is irregular. This study investigated instantaneous flow in several infusion devices set at a rate of 1 ml/hr. The following devices were tested: Infusion Pumps: IMED 956A, IVAC 570, IVION "Kids Pump." Syringe Pumps: Medfusion, Baxter, Baxter OR. Tests were performed using a Bio-Tek Infusion Device Analyzer (Model IDA-1). Instantaneous flow rate was defined as Q1/T1 where: Q=sample volume and T=time required to deliver sample volume. The infusion devices were received directly from their respective manufacturers and had not seen clinical service before testing. The units were fully charged and were tested while on AC power. The tests were conducted by the authors, using standard infusion sets and commercially prepared 5% dextrose and 0.45% sodium chloride solution. Each pump was tested for several hours and multiple trials were performed on each pump. The infusion pumps, IMED, IVION, and IVAC all demonstrated deviations from the desired flow rate. The IVAC pump had a greater fluctuation in flow from the set value of 1 ml/hr (p less than 0.02). Variances from mean +/- standard error for each device are shown in parenthesis. IMED 965A (0.005+/-0.014), IVION Kid's Pump (0.002+/-0.009), IVAC 570 (0.001+/-0.006). The Baxter syringe pump (0.002+/-0.009) also had a wide variance in flow. The Baxter OR (0.001+/-0.005) and the Medfusion (0.001+/-0.008) syringe pumps maintained the most consistent flow and showed less variance than the other devices tested.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
    Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 01/1993; 6(3):20-2.
  • Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 01/1992; 5(3):36-42.
  • Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 01/1992; 5(5):41-2, 70.
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    ABSTRACT: Volume-controlled ventilation was utilized as a rescue modality in six newborn infants with severe respiratory failure. Infants were switched from time-cycled, pressure-limited ventilation to volume-controlled ventilation at 10-12 mL/kg using the VIP-Bird infant ventilator. All six displayed dramatic improvements in oxygenation with virtually no change in mean airway pressure and with subsequent resolution of the respiratory failure. Preliminary analysis of pulmonary function during volume-controlled ventilation suggests differences in the patterns of delivery of tidal volume and minute ventilation, which are more consistent. This may improve stabilization of lung volume and decrease ventilation-perfusion mismatch.
    Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 01/1992; 5(3):70-3.
  • Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 01/1992; 5(6):55-61.
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated the operational capabilities of a new negative pressure incubator from Chelmsford, England prior to its use in our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Successful manufacturer's testing had already been completed. Teams of respiratory therapists and a biomedical engineer evaluated two identical units using 22 criteria, and results were scored on a pass/fail basis. The device passed our evaluation; we found it to be well built and reliable, with a wide range of rate, inspiratory time, peak negative inspiratory pressure and negative expiratory extrathoracic pressure settings. It did not pass criteria involving pressure monitor reliability, pressure relief, suction unit alarms, ease of service and service manual. This device may be used as a ventilator for intubated or non-intubated infants, in tandem with positive pressure mechanical ventilation replacing positive end-expiratory pressure with negative end-expiratory pressure, or alone in the continuous negative extrathoracic pressure mode.
    Neonatal intensive care: the journal of perinatology-neonatology 01/1992; 5(5):36-40.