Journal of AOAC International (J AOAC INT )

Publisher: AOAC International

Description

The Journal of AOAC International publishes fully refereed contributed papers in the fields of chemical and biological analysis: on original research on new techniques and applications, collaborative studies, authentic data of composition, studies leading to method development, meeting symposia, newly adopted AOAC approved methods and invited reviews.

  • Impact factor
    1.23
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.32
  • Cited half-life
    8.10
  • Immediacy index
    0.19
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.30
  • Website
    Journal of AOAC (Association of Official Analytical Chemists) International website
  • Other titles
    Journal of AOAC International
  • ISSN
    1060-3271
  • OCLC
    24929715
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A UHPLC-MS/MS method for the determination of folate (vitamin B9) in infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional formula was assessed for compliance with standard method performance requirements set forth by the AOAC INTERNATIONAL Stakeholder Panel for Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN). A single-laboratory validation (SLV) study was conducted as the first step in the process to validate the method. In the study, 12 matrixes, representing the range of infant and adult nutritional products, were evaluated for folate [the sum of supplemental folic acid plus 5-methyl tetrahydrofolic acid (5-Me THF)]. Method response was linear in the range of 1.0–900 ng/mL, corresponding to 0.33–300 μg/100 g in reconstituted sample. LOD for folic acid and 5-Me THF, expressed in reconstituted product, were 0.10 μg/100 g and 0.05 μg/100 g, respectively, and LOQ were 0.33 μg/100 g and 0.10 μg/100 g, respectively. Repeatability was Document Type: Research Article DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5740/jaoacint.14-055 Publication date: July 1, 2014 More about this publication? The Journal of AOAC INTERNATIONAL publishes refereed papers and reviews in the fields of chemical, biological and toxicological analytical chemistry for the purpose of showcasing the most precise, accurate and sensitive methods for analysis of foods, food additives, supplements and contaminants, cosmetics, drugs, toxins, hazardous substances, pesticides, feeds, fertilizers and the environment available at that point in time. The scope of the Journal includes unpublished original research describing new analytical methods, techniques and applications; improved approaches to sampling, both in the field and the laboratory; better methods of preparing samples for analysis; collaborative studies substantiating the performance of a given method; statistical techniques for evaluating data. The Journal will also publish other articles of general interest to its audience, e.g., technical communications; cautionary notes; comments on techniques, apparatus, and reagents. Information for Authors Submit a Paper Subscribe to this Title Information for Advertisers Journal Information Masthead ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites $(document).ready(function() { var shortdescription = $(".originaldescription").text().replace(/\\&/g, '&').replace(/\\, '<').replace(/\\>/g, '>').replace(/\\t/g, ' ').replace(/\\n/g, ''); if (shortdescription.length > 350){ shortdescription = "" + shortdescription.substring(0,250) + "... more"; } $(".descriptionitem").prepend(shortdescription); $(".shortdescription a").click(function() { $(".shortdescription").hide(); $(".originaldescription").slideDown(); return false; }); }); Related content In this: publication By this: publisher In this Subject: Agriculture/Food Sciences , Microbiology , Analytical Chemistry By this author: Meisser-Redeuil, Karine ; Bénet, Sylvie ; Gimenez, Catherine ; Campos-Giménez, Esther ; Nelson, Maria GA_googleFillSlot("Horizontal_banner_bottom");
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: A new, simple, and sensitive method was developed for extraction of ochratoxin A (OTA) in beer combined with HPLC-fluorescence detector. Samples were extracted by stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) followed by liquid desorption using commercially available Twister® EG-Silicone. The main parameters influencing SBSE, including phase ratio, extraction time, stirring speed, ionic strength, organic modifier, pH, temperature, desorption mode, desorption solvent, and desorption time were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, assay was performed on 4 mL of samples acidified at pH 1.5. The samples were extracted for 180 min at a stirring speed of 800 rpm followed by desorption of analyte using 1 mL methanol under sonication for 45 min. The extract was evaporated at 50°C under a gentle nitrogen stream, then redissolved in 200 μL of methanol–water (50 + 50, v/v). After each use, the stir bar was cleaned by sonication in methanol for 30 min three times. The method provided good linearity of the calibration curve with coefficients of determination greater than 0.999. Recoveries of OTA were greater than 83% with RSD lower than 10%, and LOD of OTA in beer was 0.64 ng/L. This method was applied to determine OTA in 19 beer samples. OTA was detected in 12 samples (63%) in the range of 0.01–0.27 ng/mL.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: This article reviews the chromatography/MS methodologies for analysis of pesticide residues of orphan and difficult chemical classes in a variety of sample matrixes including water, urine, blood, and food. The review focuses on pesticide classes that are not commonly included in multiresidue analysis methods such as highly polar or ionic herbicides including glyphosate, glufosinate, quaternary ammonium, and phenoxy acid herbicides, and some of their major degradation or metabolite products. In addition, dithiocarbamate and phthalimide fungicides, which are thermally unstable and have stability issues in some solvents or sample matrixes, are also examined due to their special needs in residue analysis.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: The SASTM Molecular Tests method for detection of Salmonella spp. in various food matrixes has been certified by the AOAC Research Institute and designated Performance Tested Method SM No. 021202. The current method modification includes the optional immunomagnetic separation (IMS) to enrich the bacteria as well as optional visual fluorescence readout without the use of a turbidimeter. The modifications were validated against the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook (MLG) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) reference methods. Food matrixes (chicken carcass rinse, beef trim, and spinach) were inoculated with low levels of Salmonella spp. (0.2–2 CFU/test portion) to generate fractional positives (5–15) in 20 inoculated samples. Samples were enriched with SAS Enrichment medium and incubated at 42 ± 1°C. Enrichments were tested directly and subjected to anti-Salmonella IMS prior to the SAS Molecular Tests. Results were determined via visual fluorescence and via turbidity using a turbidimeter. All replicates were confirmed using the MLG or BAM reference method procedures, regardless of presumptive result. The SAS Molecular Tests Salmonella Detection modified methods were determined to be equivalent to the reference methods for the detection of Salmonella in chicken carcass rinse, beef trim, and fresh spinach. The inclusion of IMS in the modified method improved the detection rate of Salmonella in chicken carcass rinses and spinach. The optional use of visual fluorescent reagent and heat block either with IMS or without IMS produced results that were comparable to the results obtained from using a real-time turbidimeter.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: This collaborative study with nine participating laboratories was conducted to determine the total plant sterol and/or plant stanol contents in phytosterol fortified foods with a gas chromatographic method. Four practice and 12 test samples representing mainly commercially available foodstuffs were analyzed as known replicates. Twelve samples were enriched with phytosterols, whereas four samples contained only natural contents of phytosterols. The analytical procedure consisted of two alternative approaches: hot saponification method, and acid hydrolysis treatment prior to hot saponification. As a result, sterol/stanol compositions and contents in the samples were measured. The amounts of total plant sterols and total plant stanols varying from 0.005 to 8.04 g/100 g product were statistically evaluated after outliers were eliminated. The repeatability RSD (RSDr) varied from 1.34 to 17.13%. The reproducibility RSD (RSDR) ranged from 3.03 to 17.70%, with HorRat values ranging from 0.8 to 2.1. When only phytosterol enriched food test samples are considered, the RSDr ranged from 1.48 to 6.13%, the RSDR ranged from 3.03 to 7.74%, and HorRat values ranged from 0.8 to 2.1. Based on the results of this collaborative study, the study coordinator concludes the method is fit for its purpose.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Components that could be used as indicators for the discrimination of senna (Cassia angustifolia) from other cassia plants contained in health teas were identified, and an analytical method for the components was developed. Our results revealed two components in senna that were not found in other Cassia spp. widely used in health teas, such as C. alata, C. corymbosa, C. obtusifolia, and C. occidentalis. Structural elucidation of the two components showed that they were isorhamnetin-3-O-gentiobioside and tinnevellin glucoside. We analyzed commercial health teas using the HPLC method developed in this study. The two indicator components were detected at 366 nm using an RP C18 column and gradient elution with a mixture of water and acetonitrile (with formic acid), as the mobile phase. Our analytical method by HPLC enabled the differentiation of senna from other Cassia plants present in health teas in which sennosides A and B were detected. Moreover, this method allowed us to predict the parts of senna in health teas from the amounts of isorhamnetin-3-O-gentiobioside and tinnevellin glucoside contained in the teas.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
  • Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: The electro-oxidation of the benomyl fungicide was studied by square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry. The voltammetric current at a glassy carbon electrode was acquired within the pH range 1.0–10.0. The quantitation was performed using the peak generated at +1144 mV by scanning the potential from +0.00 to +1600 mV (versus an Ag/AgCl reference electrode, 3 M NaCl). Accumulation potential = 0.0 mV, accumulation time = 45 s, frequency = 75 Hz, pulse amplitude = –60 mV, and staircase step potential = 7 mV were used as square-wave parameters. The peak current versus concentrations plot were rectilinear over the range from 0.081 to 1.496 μg/mL with an LOD of 0.024 μg/mL. Mean recovery was 99.0% (0.198 ± 0.011 μg/mL), which was very close to the benomyl content spiked into river water (0.20 μg/mL). The method was efficiently applied for benomyl determination in the pesticide formulation Minelate 50WG®, and the average determined content of 49.8 ± 0.16 (n = 5) was consistent with the 50% benomyl (w/w) quoted by the manufacturer. The benomyl voltammograms recorded between days exhibited a negligible degradation into carbendazim metabolite, and therefore all results were given as the total benomyl concentration. The high recoveries and low RSD gave evidence of good accuracy and precision.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: A method for the determination of 14 biopesticides and piperonyl butoxide (PBO), often applied in organic farming, in vegetables and fruits has been developed. Extraction was performed using the Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe method, and the determination was carried out by ultra-performance LC/MS/MS in 9 min. Several different food commodities were evaluated as representative matrixes, namely, cucumber, tomato, pepper (high water content), and strawberry and orange (high acid and water content). Biopesticides were quantified using matrix-matched calibration, and the optimized method was validated at three concentration levels, i.e., 10, 50, and 100 μg/kg, for all the compounds, yielding recoveries in the range 70–112%, 71–112%, and 70–109%, respectively, with RSDs Document Type: Research Article DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5740/jaoacint.SGERomeroGonzalez Publication date: July 1, 2014 More about this publication? The Journal of AOAC INTERNATIONAL publishes refereed papers and reviews in the fields of chemical, biological and toxicological analytical chemistry for the purpose of showcasing the most precise, accurate and sensitive methods for analysis of foods, food additives, supplements and contaminants, cosmetics, drugs, toxins, hazardous substances, pesticides, feeds, fertilizers and the environment available at that point in time. The scope of the Journal includes unpublished original research describing new analytical methods, techniques and applications; improved approaches to sampling, both in the field and the laboratory; better methods of preparing samples for analysis; collaborative studies substantiating the performance of a given method; statistical techniques for evaluating data. The Journal will also publish other articles of general interest to its audience, e.g., technical communications; cautionary notes; comments on techniques, apparatus, and reagents. Information for Authors Submit a Paper Subscribe to this Title Information for Advertisers Journal Information Masthead ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites $(document).ready(function() { var shortdescription = $(".originaldescription").text().replace(/\\&/g, '&').replace(/\\, '<').replace(/\\>/g, '>').replace(/\\t/g, ' ').replace(/\\n/g, ''); if (shortdescription.length > 350){ shortdescription = "" + shortdescription.substring(0,250) + "... more"; } $(".descriptionitem").prepend(shortdescription); $(".shortdescription a").click(function() { $(".shortdescription").hide(); $(".originaldescription").slideDown(); return false; }); }); Related content In this: publication By this: publisher In this Subject: Agriculture/Food Sciences , Microbiology , Analytical Chemistry By this author: Romero-González, Roberto ; Plaza-Bolaños, Patricia ; Limón-Garduza, Rocío I. ; Martínez-Vidal, José L. ; Frenich, Antonia Garrido GA_googleFillSlot("Horizontal_banner_bottom");
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Color additives are dyes, pigments, or other substances that can impart color when added or applied to foods, drugs, cosmetics, medical devices, or the human body. These substances must be pre-approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and listed in the Code of Federal Regulations before they may be used in FDA-regulated products. Both domestic and imported cosmetic products sold in interstate commerce fall under FDA jurisdiction, and FDA's district laboratories use a combination of analytical methods for identifying or confirming the presence of potentially violative color additives. We have developed a qualitative method for identifying 29 water- and methanol-soluble color additives in various types of cosmetic products. The color additives are extracted with combinations of methylene chloride, methanol, acetic acid, and water and are identified by LC with photodiode array detection. Estimated LOD values ranged from 0.1 to 1.5 mg/L. A survey of lip products, nail polishes, eye products, blushes, body glitter, face paints, bath products, creams, and toothpastes identified permitted and non-permitted color additives. Our new LC method is intended to supplement the visible spectrophotometry and TLC methods currently used by FDA's district laboratories and will help optimize the use of time, labor, and solvents.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Serum samples from 74 obese women were assayed for 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations using an automated immunoassay [Architect (Abbott)] and ELISA (Alpco Diagnostics), and results were compared with the LC/MS/MS reference method (Quest Diagnostics). The Architect values were significantly lower (mean difference: –13 nmol/L; 95% limits: –54; 28 nmol/L) and the ELISA values were significantly higher (mean difference: 24 nmol/L; 95% limits: –36; 84 nmol/L) than the LC/MS/MS values. The slope of the Passing-Bablok regression line relative to LC/MS/MS was 0.5 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.41; 0.60] and 1.17 (95% CI: 0.87; 1.56) for Architect and ELISA, respectively, with an intercept of approximately 16 for both assays. Using 50 nmol/L as the cut-point for deficiency, Architect and ELISA misclassified 20 and 27% of the subjects, respectively. In subjects with low circulating 25-hydroxylated ergocalciferol [25(OH)D2] (2 (≥10 nmol/L), Architect demonstrated poor agreement (Kappa = 0.40; 95% CI: 0.16–0.65). ELISA demonstrated a higher degree of overestimation in women with minimal 25(OH)D2 than those with high 25(OH)D2, suggesting that ELISA overestimates 25-hydroxylated cholecalciferol [25(OH)D3] but underestimates 25(OH)D2.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: A simple and fast method has been developed for determining relevant quaternary ammonium compounds in cucumber and orange samples. The target compounds were benzoalkonium chloride (BAC-10, BAC-12, BAC-14, and BAC-16), didecyldimethylammonium chloride, and benzethonium chloride, all frequently used biocides in the agrifood industry. An extraction based on the buffered Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe method and determination by ultra-performance LC/MS/MS that eluted the biocides in less than 5 min were used. The method was fully validated and implemented in a UNE-EN-ISO/IEC 17025 accredited laboratory for its application to the analysis of real samples. Performance characteristics of the method are reported, including an estimation of measurement uncertainty. Calibration curves were set between 0.01 and 0.150 mg/kg, LOD values were always between 0.4 and 1.0 μg/kg, LOQ values were in the range 1–4 μg/kg, recovery was between 81 and 115%, intraday and interday precision were always lower than 17% (expressed as RSD), and expanded uncertainty was always lower than 40%. The validation was accomplished for the two studied matrixes at spiking concentrations of 0.011 and 0.050 mg/kg. The method has been applied to the analysis of 30 cucumber and orange samples that were found to contain concentrations of BAC-12 that ranged between 0.015 and 0.210 mg/kg and of BAC-14 between 0.018 and 0.081 mg/kg.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes a GC/MS method for the determination of flurbiprofen in human plasma. Flurbiprofen and internal standard ibuprofen were extracted from plasma by using a liquid–liquid extraction method. Derivatization was carried out using N-Methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide. The calibration curve was linear between the concentration range of 0.10 and 5.0 μg/mL. Intraday and interday precision values for flurbiprofen in plasma were less than 5.49%, and accuracy (relative error) was better than 5.33%. The extraction recoveries of flurbiprofen from human plasma were between 93.6 and 98.6%. The LOD and LOQ of flurbiprofen were 0.03 and 0.10 μg/mL, respectively. This assay was applied to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of flurbiprofen in healthy Turkish volunteers who had been given 100 mg of flurbiprofen.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: A cloud-point extraction (CPE) method with Triton X-114 has been developed for analysis of six organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in apples and pears. In this CPE procedure, the effects of the surfactant volume, mass of sodium chloride, equilibrium temperature, equilibrium time, and pH on the extraction procedure were investigated. Under the optimal CPE conditions, the analytes were enriched 20-fold and the LODs dropped to 0.44–5.20 μg/kg. Furthermore, the proposed extraction method was validated by the correlation coefficient (R2) of the calibration curve, repeatability (RSD, n = 6), and fortified recoveries, which were 0.9967–0.9993, 2.7–6.5, and 74.7–104.5%, respectively. Based on these results, it could be concluded that the proposed CPE method with Triton X-114 was suitable for the effective extraction and enrichment of OPP residues in the apple and pear samples.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: This work deals with spectrophotometric, spectrofluorimetric, and potentiometric analyses of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) cationic detergent. The spectrophotometric procedure depends on measuring the absorbance of its binary complex with eosin yellow in Britton-Robinson buffer (pH 4) at λmax 547 nm in the range of 2.0–14.0 μg/mL with an accuracy of 100.15 ± 0.54%. The spectrofluorimetric procedure depends on determining the quenching of the fluorescence intensity of fluorescein dye by CTAB in the presence of borate buffer at λem = 500 nm, λex = 304 nm, in the range of 2.90–14.50 μg/mL with an accuracy of 99.81 ± 0.33%. The electrochemical procedure describes an ionophore-based technique using a graphite sensor to measure 0.036 μg/mL and showed an accuracy of 100.11 ± 0.61%. The experimental conditions affecting each of the three suggested procedures were studied and optimized. All the developed procedures were validated and satisfactorily applied for the determination of CTAB in industrial wastewater samples.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: A cloud point extraction (CPE) method for determination of trace amounts of penicillin G by spectrophotometry based on its effect on the triiodide ion (I3–) has been developed. Penicillin G is converted to the corresponding penicilloic acid by carrying out hydrolysis with sodium hydroxide solution, and treatment with acid yields D-penicillamine that is oxidized quantitatively by iodine to give rise to a disulfide. The I3– remaining in the solution is extracted into the surfactant Triton X-100, and the difference between absorbance of the working solution in the presence and absence of penicillin G is proportional to the amount of penicillin G. The effects of different variables, such as concentrations of sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid, surfactant, and I3– and the temperature and incubation time on the CPE were studied. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 50–1250 μg/L, and the LOD was 38 μg/L (n = 10). The RSD for 10 replicate determinations of 1000 μg/L of penicillin G was 1.0%. The method was applied to the determination of penicillin G in milk samples.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: ACTERO™ Listeria Enrichment Media (ACTERO Listeria) is a selective medium developed for a single-step recovery and enrichment of Listeria spp. from environmental samples. Robustness testing of the ACTERO Listeria medium demonstrated good performance when minor changes were introduced to the incubation temperature and time. All 54 Listeria strains tested, representing the most frequently isolated Listeria species from food (L. monocytogenes, L. ivanovii, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. grayi), were successfully enriched in ACTERO Listeria. None of the 30 nontarget strains tested in the exclusivity study was recovered after incubation in ACTERO Listeria. Recovery of Listeria was consistent across three independently produced lots of the ACTERO Listeria, and the prepared medium was stable for 45 days when stored at 4°C in the dark. Matrix studies performed with environmental sponge samples from plastic and stainless steel surfaces demonstrated similar recovery of Listeria spp. in a single-step enrichment using ACTERO Listeria from plastic, and significantly better recovery from stainless steel surfaces when compared to the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety and Inspection Service reference method. The results of this study prove that ACTERO Listeria Enrichment Media can be effectively used in replacement of the two-step enrichment suggested by the reference method without affecting the recovery of Listeria spp. from environmental samples.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Total concentration of metal ions at trace levels does not give sufficient information about toxicity and biological availability of these elements in fertilizer samples. In the presented work, a sequential extraction procedure modified by the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) was applied to fractionate Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, Ni, and Zn levels in two fertilizer samples collected from cooperative agricultural retailers. The fractions extracted were exchangeable/dilute acid soluble, reducible bound to Fe/Mn oxides, oxidizable bound to organic matter and sulfides, and residual. The determination of analyte elements was done by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The accuracy of the procedure was validated with BCR-701 sediment certified reference material. The RSD of the procedure was less than 10%.
    Journal of AOAC International 08/2014; 97(4).

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